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Apple Juice

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FOOD
September 6, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: My kids love to drink apple juice, but their dentist says it's bad for their teeth. Is this true? I really thought drinking juice was better for them than soda. - Fran Unfortunately, apple juice really is not much more than flavored sugar water, according to most nutritionists. And a constant drenching of the teeth with it is probably not the best thing for the kids, although saliva washes juice from the teeth more quickly than it washes away sticky candies or dried fruits.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
  It's true - apple juice can pose a risk to your health. But not necessarily from the trace amounts of arsenic that people are arguing about. Despite the government's consideration of new limits on arsenic, nutrition experts say apple juice's real danger is to waistlines and children's teeth. Apple juice has few natural nutrients, lots of calories and, in some cases, more sugar than soda has. It trains a child to like very sweet things, displaces better beverages and foods, and adds to obesity, critics say. "It's like sugar water," said Judith Stern, a nutrition professor at the University of California, Davis, who has consulted for candy makers as well as for Weight Watchers.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania supermarket chain has filed a $10 million class action suit against Beech-Nut Nutrition Corp. of Fort Washington, charging the company with fraud in connection with the sale of a sugar water solution as apple juice for babies between 1978 and 1983. Giant Markets, a Scranton company, filed the class action suit in U.S. District Court yesterday on behalf of itself and other retailers who sold the bogus apple juice. The suit charges that Beech-Nut sold as "100 percent apple juice" a solution of water and ingredients that included beet sugar, caramel color, cane sugar syrup, corn syrup and maleic acid.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1986 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Scranton supermarket chain yesterday filed a class-action suit seeking at least $10 million from Beech Nut Nutrition Corp. and charging that the baby- food company sold "significant quantities" of flavored sugar water as apple juice from 1978 to 1983. Giant Markets Inc., a chain of eight stores in the Scranton area, filed the suit in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia on behalf of "hundreds, if not thousands," of Beech Nut customers. The suit comes one week after the president of Beech Nut and five others were indicted on charges of conspiracy and violations of the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act for allegedly selling millions of bottles of sugar water as apple juice.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
NEWS
May 9, 1987 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beech-Nut Nutrition Corp. of Fort Washington, the baby-food producer accused of selling millions of bottles of sugar water labeled as apple juice, has agreed to pay $7.5 million to settle seven class-action suits against the company, attorneys announced yesterday. Under terms of the agreement, $5 million will be paid to consumers who can verify that they purchased the bogus apple juice between Oct. 1, 1978, and March 31, 1983. In addition, the settlement calls for Beech-Nut to provide $2.5 million worth of its food products to supermarkets and grocery stores throughout the nation as their share of the agreement, said David Berger, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs in the case.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
For more than 50 years, Red Cheek has sold its apple juice warm in supermarkets. That changed somewhat last month, when Red Cheek, based in Fleetwood, Pa., worked out an agreement with Smiler Beverage Co., a Philadelphia beer distributor, to distribute sell Red Cheek's new, 10-ounce bottles of apple juice to delicatessens, pizza parlors or restaurants, where it can be refrigerated. "It's called growing the business," said Franklin Claire, Red Cheek's president, when asked why the company is pushing its product through a beer distributor.
FOOD
September 7, 1988 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Yes, you can make your own jams and preserves, despite your diet, and despite high fruit prices too! These small-quantity "preserves" are simple to make, and you don't need sugar. You don't need pectin, or a pressure cooker either. In fact, you don't cook these at all. What we have here are the freshest, fruitiest spreads you can make, not like anything available in the store. Because these aren't sterilized by traditional preserving methods - and contain no sugar - they must be stored in the refrigerator and used promptly (within a week or two, or stored in the freezer until needed)
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Apple juice is one sugary drink Television's Dr. Mehmet Oz recently raised an alarm - experts say a false one - over arsenic in apple juice. But nutrition experts say apple juice's real danger is to waistlines and children's teeth. Apple juice has few natural nutrients, lots of calories, and, in some cases, more sugar than soda has. It trains children to like sweets, displaces better beverages and foods, and adds to the obesity problem, critics say. Many juices are fortified with vitamins, so they're not empty calories.
FOOD
August 12, 1992 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Baby Blue Saga Cheese. $5.99 per 12-oz. wheel. Bonnie: Blue Saga is a creamy, mild Danish cheese with pungently flavored blue veins. Like other blue cheeses, the visible dark-colored veins are from the safe-to-eat mold that's been injected during the cheese-making process. Baby Saga is just this company's Classic Blue Saga in a convenient 12-ounce round. Both Baby and Classic Saga are high-fat cheeses. Each contains about 12 grams fat in a 130-calories-per-ounce serving. But Saga is lower in fat than such desserts as an ice cream sundae or strawberry shortcake, which is why I'd serve Saga European-style, along with some fresh fruit for dessert.
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NEWS
April 29, 2013
Apple juice is one sugary drink Television's Dr. Mehmet Oz recently raised an alarm - experts say a false one - over arsenic in apple juice. But nutrition experts say apple juice's real danger is to waistlines and children's teeth. Apple juice has few natural nutrients, lots of calories, and, in some cases, more sugar than soda has. It trains children to like sweets, displaces better beverages and foods, and adds to the obesity problem, critics say. Many juices are fortified with vitamins, so they're not empty calories.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
For the spice rub:   3 tablespoons smoked sea salt or kosher salt 2 tablespoons light brown sugar 3 tablespoons sweet paprika 1 tablespoon mustard seeds 1 tablespoon garlic powder 2 teaspoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons ground ginger 1? teaspoons cayenne pepper An 8-pound brisket, fat trimmed to ? inch on top Pepper 1 red onion, grated ? cup apple juice or cider ? cup lager beer, at room temperature 12 seeded sourdough or kaiser rolls, split Coarsely grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese   For smoky barbecue sauce:   1 cup ketchup 2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 2 tablespoons dark amber maple syrup 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1?
FOOD
March 1, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Some recipes are so great that you don't want to change a thing. Each time you make it, you only hope that it tastes as good as the first time. This recipe for Curried Butternut Squash Soup is one of those I've been making for 20-some years, since it was published in the The Silver Palate Cookbook . Blessedly, what has changed over the years is that this soup has become much easier to make. For one thing, butternut squash is now available peeled, chopped, and packaged at many grocery stores, eliminating the scary prospect of sticking a knife into a rock-hard squash and risking the loss of a finger if the knife slips.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
  It's true - apple juice can pose a risk to your health. But not necessarily from the trace amounts of arsenic that people are arguing about. Despite the government's consideration of new limits on arsenic, nutrition experts say apple juice's real danger is to waistlines and children's teeth. Apple juice has few natural nutrients, lots of calories and, in some cases, more sugar than soda has. It trains a child to like very sweet things, displaces better beverages and foods, and adds to obesity, critics say. "It's like sugar water," said Judith Stern, a nutrition professor at the University of California, Davis, who has consulted for candy makers as well as for Weight Watchers.
NEWS
January 28, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I am making this appeal on Derek Felton's behalf. Because even a guardian angel needs help every now and then. Felton is a grassroots leader, but not self-appointed. He's a faith-filled man, but not preachy. He's a community organizer for the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger, but doesn't try to take over. He's simply a do-gooder who does good. And food is one thing he does especially well. For more than a decade, on his own time, Felton has distributed 400 bags of groceries per month to low-income neighbors in Mantua and Parkside through his Fresh Start program.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank C. Nicholas, 89, of Villanova, a former Beech-Nut Corp. chairman, died of complications from dementia Friday at home. In 1973, Mr. Nicholas and two associates bought Beech-Nut Foods Corp. As company president and chairman, Mr. Nicholas announced in 1977 that salt and most of the sugar from Beech-Nut strained foods and juices for infants would be eliminated and launched a campaign advertising that Beech-Nut products were free of preservatives, flavor enhancers, and artificial colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009
'DRUNK BY NOON?" read the headline in the Houston Chronicle last week. "Perfectly acceptable in Philly. " It was an Associated Press story about the number of morning tavern events spicing up Philly Beer Week. "In many places," said the report, "drinking before noon is something to hide. Not in Philadelphia. " More than a couple of local readers sent me the link, outraged that we'd been disparaged as a town of reeling winos, clutching soggy brown paper bags while the rest of America wakes up to Starbucks.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Sam Wood and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
An 84-year-old woman died at a Burlington County hospital Monday night two days after drinking tiki torch lamp oil that she had mistaken for apple juice. Four other people across New Jersey have gotten sick since May from accidentally drinking the amber liquid, prompting state officials to issue a health alert yesterday about the hazards of ingesting it. Officials have urged people to keep tiki torch fluid far away from foods and common areas to avoid confusion. "Lamp oil bottles closely resemble juice containers and the colors of those fluids is indistinguishable from juice," said Bruce Ruck, spokesman for the state Poison Information and Education System.
FOOD
October 23, 2002 | By Deborah Scoblionkov INQUIRER WINE COLUMNIST
Fresh apple cider is one of autumn's sweetest traditions, both literally and figuratively. Sophisticated palates are hard-pressed to find a dry cider unless it's been hardened through fermentation. Basically, there are two types of cider - sweet (or unfermented) and hard (fermented). I'll be looking at hard ciders in my Nov. 20 Thanksgiving "On Wine" column in this section. Just as a wine's quality depends on the type and quality of grapes used, the quality of apple cider depends on the type of fruit used.
FOOD
October 23, 2002 | By Jon Caroulis FOR THE INQUIRER
What's better than a crisp fall afternoon? How about a crisp, sweet glass of apple cider to welcome the change of seasons? Cider is a versatile beverage. You can serve it ice cold, or heat and spice it up with cinnamon, cloves and ginger. Producers can give it sparkle by adding carbon dioxide or ferment it into hard cider, which is usually 3 to 7 percent alcohol. But it begins and ends with the fruit. Pure cider contains nothing but the juice of pressed apples. Yet it is a more hand-crafted product than apple juice, which is made from concentrate and filtered numerous times for clarity.
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