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BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Matthew Craft, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stronger profits from Microsoft, McDonald's and other major U.S. corporations pushed stocks higher Friday. Optimism from Europe helped brighten the mood. Before the market opened, McDonald's posted better quarterly profits, buoyed by warm weather and sales of new menu items such as Chicken McBites and oatmeal. Sales picked up even in Europe, McDonald's' biggest market, despite economic turmoil and severe weather. Microsoft beat analysts' projections with quarterly earnings and revenue, and sales in its Windows division were surprisingly strong.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2011
"We're putting all our cash in the bank, dumping the contents of the slot machines, taking chips off the floor then locking them away. " - Dennis Gomes, co-owner of Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, on preparations for Hurricane Irene. "It was nothing more than an economic pep talk. " - Greg McBride, senior financial analyst for Bankrate.com, on Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's Friday speech. "He appears to be saying that the Fed has largely played its part and that the politicians need to step up their game.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2010 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Will it be the next iPod or the new Newton? If there were an app for foreseeing truly revolutionary technology, Apple could have made a bundle in the weeks preceding yesterday's unveiling of its new, tablet-size portable computer dubbed - drumroll, please - the iPad. Though no one knew exactly what it would be called or do, techno-pundits gushed that it could "change everything," starting with newspapers, books, and television. One writer called it, only partly tongue-in-cheek, "the most eagerly awaited tablet since Moses.
FOOD
December 30, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
I'd been on the lookout for a final taste of 2010, a last bite of the apple, so to speak. But there wasn't much time or energy left in me one day last week. I'd already had way too much of a lunch at the Dutch Eating Place in the Reading Terminal Market - my old standby cup of beef-vegetable soup and, this time, a roast turkey sandwich with gravy and creamy mashed potatoes. So on the way out the door - passing by the Fair Food Farmstand - I decided to grab an apple. Let's be more precise.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reputations die hard in this genteel Southern town - especially for hard- drinking, boy-crazy, country singers from the wrong side of the tracks. This was the home of Patsy Cline, the country music legend who died in a plane crash in 1963. But for years there were no streets named after her, no memorials, no way to know where she was born or where she was buried. The chamber of commerce doesn't even mention her in its tourist guide, although the tomb of Lord Fairfax, "proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia" in the mid-1700s, is listed prominently under "Points of Interest.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Apple Computer Inc.'s debt was cut to the status of a junk bond yesterday, while a key survey said the personal-computer maker slipped to third in world-market share from second place. The double-dose of bad news comes as Apple is struggling with losses, takeover talks, and a restructuring plan to try to resurrect its battered business prospects. Standard & Poor's lowered its rating on $300 million worth of Apple's debt to "junk" level, citing expected operating losses, uncertain strategic direction, and management turmoil.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | By James Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
It won't go down as one of the great moments in rock history. The band had just finished playing a selection of standards - "Mustang Sally," "Under the Boardwalk," "Twist and Shout" - and the mystery guest was about to appear. The lights dimmed and he bounded on stage, guitar in hand, and ripped into a searing version of "Wild Thing. " Playing the strings with his tongue, dropping to his knees and screaming, "Sock it to me," Ron Howard electrified the crowd. OK, so what if his voice was a little thin and his moves a little clumsy?
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
If you are traveling through Colorado, watch what you say about the food. Cast no aspersions on the asparagus. Slander not the celery. Don't libel the lettuce. The folks who live in the Rocky Mountain State have become unfriendly to the sort of people who might ruin the reputation of a rutabaga. They have a bill, about to face its last legislative hurdle, that would make it possible to take legal action against someone who knowingly and falsely trashed the turnips. People could be sued, in the words of the bill, for disseminating "any false information which is not based on reliable scientific facts and scientific data, which the disseminator knows or should have known to be false and which casts doubt on the safety of any perishable agricultural food product to the consuming public.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Tyler Gettmann (right) beat Brian Dunlap yesterday at coming up with an apple in Barclay Elementary's sixth-grade apple-bobbing contest.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | Jeff Gelles
The new Samsung Galaxy S III smartphone is a genuine iPhone challenger. A couple of days with it is plenty to find clues why Apple has pursued Samsung so aggressively over patent-infringement claims — and this week won a court order blocking U.S. sales of the S III's cousin, Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet. Despite Apple's complaints about "copycat products," the Galaxy S III is rolling out largely as planned. All four national carriers have announced versions of the sleek, slim phone, which runs on the latest version of Google's Android operating system and boasts a screen with about 70 percent more real estate than Apple's iPhone 4S. T-Mobile has already begun selling the S III, offering a 16-gigabyte version — that I tested — for $280 with a two-year contract, after a $50 mail-in rebate.
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