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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reputations die hard in this genteel Southern town - especially for hard- drinking, boy-crazy, country singers from the wrong side of the tracks. This was the home of Patsy Cline, the country music legend who died in a plane crash in 1963. But for years there were no streets named after her, no memorials, no way to know where she was born or where she was buried. The chamber of commerce doesn't even mention her in its tourist guide, although the tomb of Lord Fairfax, "proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia" in the mid-1700s, is listed prominently under "Points of Interest.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Apple Computer Inc.'s debt was cut to the status of a junk bond yesterday, while a key survey said the personal-computer maker slipped to third in world-market share from second place. The double-dose of bad news comes as Apple is struggling with losses, takeover talks, and a restructuring plan to try to resurrect its battered business prospects. Standard & Poor's lowered its rating on $300 million worth of Apple's debt to "junk" level, citing expected operating losses, uncertain strategic direction, and management turmoil.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | By James Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
It won't go down as one of the great moments in rock history. The band had just finished playing a selection of standards - "Mustang Sally," "Under the Boardwalk," "Twist and Shout" - and the mystery guest was about to appear. The lights dimmed and he bounded on stage, guitar in hand, and ripped into a searing version of "Wild Thing. " Playing the strings with his tongue, dropping to his knees and screaming, "Sock it to me," Ron Howard electrified the crowd. OK, so what if his voice was a little thin and his moves a little clumsy?
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
If you are traveling through Colorado, watch what you say about the food. Cast no aspersions on the asparagus. Slander not the celery. Don't libel the lettuce. The folks who live in the Rocky Mountain State have become unfriendly to the sort of people who might ruin the reputation of a rutabaga. They have a bill, about to face its last legislative hurdle, that would make it possible to take legal action against someone who knowingly and falsely trashed the turnips. People could be sued, in the words of the bill, for disseminating "any false information which is not based on reliable scientific facts and scientific data, which the disseminator knows or should have known to be false and which casts doubt on the safety of any perishable agricultural food product to the consuming public.
NEWS
June 21, 2015
Summer is always ripe for cherry pie. But this year, I'm excited about the one that's pouring on draft: Cherry Pie, the cider. This wickedly good blush of sweet-tart dry cider comes from Stone & Key Cellars in Montgomeryville, the eight-month-old custom crush winery from the owners of Keystone Homebrew Supply that's also become one of the state's innovative new cideries. S&K's initial cider series ferments a blend of up to 17 apple varieties from Solebury Orchards to complete dryness followed by a variety of vivid finishes, including a funky wild yeast for "Untamed," or the oaky vanilla of brandy barrels.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In those cash-strapped days when you first moved into your own place and used plastic milk crates as furniture, you might not have considered yourself part of the sustainability movement. But you were, by repurposing that crate. A few years ago, Morgan Berman decided she, too, wanted to live a greener existence. "I kept thinking, 'I want to make these life choices,' but I didn't know how," the 29-year-old Philadelphia resident recalled. So she developed an app, MilkCrate, to help her and other like-minded consumers connect with local sustainable businesses and other resources.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Tyler Gettmann (right) beat Brian Dunlap yesterday at coming up with an apple in Barclay Elementary's sixth-grade apple-bobbing contest.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you're thinking of gambling on the coming Alibaba Group IPO, hear out this tech bull and growth-company fan. He's not buying. The Chinese version of eBay, Alibaba promises explosive growth and has filed to raise between $21 billion and $25 billion in its initial public offering. Paul Meeks, director of institutional investing at Saturna Capital and portfolio manager of the Sextant Growth Fund (symbol:SSGFX), isn't comfortable with the online retailer's accounting, or the fact that the China tech darling has several times rewritten its offering documents.
NEWS
November 1, 2014
  LOGAN COHEN, 24, of Malvern, is co-founder and COO of ed-tech startup Kudzoo. The company built a mobile app that rewards students, aged 13 and older, for their grades and achievements with deals and opportunities. Cohen also teaches a weekly entrepreneurship class for 14-to-16-year-olds at the Science Leadership Academy.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Kudzoo? A: My co-founder, Trevor Wilkins, came up with it to reward students for academic achievement. It started as discounts and deals and we wanted to see what would get kids excited and it evolved into an app. Q: The startup money?
NEWS
August 29, 2014
M ORGAN BERMAN, 29, of Fairmount, is founder and CEO of MilkCrate, a mobile app that has been described as "Green Yelp with Soul. " Berman, who has a master's degree in sustainable design from Philadelphia University, got frustrated having to look on Google for eco-friendly businesses in Philadelphia. A 30-day Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, launched Sunday, had raised at least $4,410 of a $20,000 goal as of yesterday. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for MilkCrate? A: There was so much great information on websites, but no central place someone could go to figure out how to live more sustainably in Philadelphia.
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