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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1992 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reputations die hard in this genteel Southern town - especially for hard- drinking, boy-crazy, country singers from the wrong side of the tracks. This was the home of Patsy Cline, the country music legend who died in a plane crash in 1963. But for years there were no streets named after her, no memorials, no way to know where she was born or where she was buried. The chamber of commerce doesn't even mention her in its tourist guide, although the tomb of Lord Fairfax, "proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia" in the mid-1700s, is listed prominently under "Points of Interest.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Apple Computer Inc.'s debt was cut to the status of a junk bond yesterday, while a key survey said the personal-computer maker slipped to third in world-market share from second place. The double-dose of bad news comes as Apple is struggling with losses, takeover talks, and a restructuring plan to try to resurrect its battered business prospects. Standard & Poor's lowered its rating on $300 million worth of Apple's debt to "junk" level, citing expected operating losses, uncertain strategic direction, and management turmoil.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | By James Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
It won't go down as one of the great moments in rock history. The band had just finished playing a selection of standards - "Mustang Sally," "Under the Boardwalk," "Twist and Shout" - and the mystery guest was about to appear. The lights dimmed and he bounded on stage, guitar in hand, and ripped into a searing version of "Wild Thing. " Playing the strings with his tongue, dropping to his knees and screaming, "Sock it to me," Ron Howard electrified the crowd. OK, so what if his voice was a little thin and his moves a little clumsy?
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
If you are traveling through Colorado, watch what you say about the food. Cast no aspersions on the asparagus. Slander not the celery. Don't libel the lettuce. The folks who live in the Rocky Mountain State have become unfriendly to the sort of people who might ruin the reputation of a rutabaga. They have a bill, about to face its last legislative hurdle, that would make it possible to take legal action against someone who knowingly and falsely trashed the turnips. People could be sued, in the words of the bill, for disseminating "any false information which is not based on reliable scientific facts and scientific data, which the disseminator knows or should have known to be false and which casts doubt on the safety of any perishable agricultural food product to the consuming public.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Tyler Gettmann (right) beat Brian Dunlap yesterday at coming up with an apple in Barclay Elementary's sixth-grade apple-bobbing contest.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you're thinking of gambling on the coming Alibaba Group IPO, hear out this tech bull and growth-company fan. He's not buying. The Chinese version of eBay, Alibaba promises explosive growth and has filed to raise between $21 billion and $25 billion in its initial public offering. Paul Meeks, director of institutional investing at Saturna Capital and portfolio manager of the Sextant Growth Fund (symbol:SSGFX), isn't comfortable with the online retailer's accounting, or the fact that the China tech darling has several times rewritten its offering documents.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Jordan Robertson, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and masterfully marketed ever-sleeker gadgets that transformed everyday technology, from the personal computer to the iPod and iPhone, died Wednesday. He was 56. Apple announced his death without giving a specific cause. He died peacefully, according to a statement from family members who said they were present. "Steve's brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives," Apple's board said in a statement.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
All the cool Philadelphians are drinking Colonial these days. The Tavern ales from Yards, of course, set that standard long ago. But suddenly this month, a rare and precious Madeira named for Ben Franklin hit the scene. And now comes Revolution Cider, which allows us to crack open bottles of the Founding Fathers' other favorite drink - the origin of that old "apple a day" maxim for good health. This fizzy orchard blast from the past comes courtesy of brothers Jonathan and Gideon Gradman, whose new cidery in the Northeast is modeling its flavor and fermentation techniques on a Colonial style.
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