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Appreciation

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NEWS
December 1, 2015
AMERICA doesn't care because young black men have been demonized and are seen as less than human to some people, especially those in power. We are constantly bombarded with images and stories of black men doing wrong without context or background info unless it involves prior criminal activity. When we get stories of whites committing crime there always seems to be a built-in excuse and back story, like the teacher who was having sex with her students. We found out how lonely she was. It's a big difference.
SPORTS
October 21, 1991 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Think of the Twins and the average baseball fan will think of Kirby Puckett and, maybe, Kent Hrbek. Think of the Twins and real fans probably remember that Jack Morris was signed as a free agent before this season and that second baseman Chuck Knoblauch will probably be voted the American League's Rookie of the Year. But think about the Twins beating the Atlanta Braves, 5-2, Saturday night in the opening game of the 88th World Series and realize that the turning point was a three-run homer hit by a guy who bats in the pitcher's spot in the order.
NEWS
November 30, 2009
IT WAS ABOUT 12 years ago that I first attended a Somerton Civic Association meeting and met Mary Jane Hazell, the association president who passed away recently. What impressed me was her steadfast nature and determination for her community of Somerton, Northeast Philadelphia and the entire city. The civic association was real democracy in action. This is how it must have been in colonial times when neighbors got together to address the problems of the times. I remember meetings where, in her inimitable fashion, she told developers or politicians to go pound sand.
NEWS
April 8, 1996 | For The Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
Carol Firth gets a lick of appreciation from the freshly shorn and bathed Celeste. The dog was a visitor last week to Firth's Grooming by Carol business, located in the back of the Ardmore Animal Hospital.
NEWS
December 4, 2002
I'D LIKE to express my appreciation and thanks to the Daily News for your article (Nov. 8) celebrating my 100th birthday. Your outline of my work has touched the tender nerves of my living and being. Indeed, it is only through the constitutional gift of freedom of the press that human works are recorded and remembered. For we Americans like this country as it is. We would rather ride in an oxcart or a covered wagon in a democracy than in a Rolls-Royce driven by a dictator.
NEWS
November 23, 2001
PHILADELPHIA has a unique although somewhat awkward - opportunity in this time of renewed interest and appreciation for our nation and its founding principles. Right here is where our founders first gave voice all those principles that we are now fighting for. Here's where the genius of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were born. So how does the city exploit the deeper appreciation Americans now have for this legacy, without seeming exploitative in the bargain?
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Barrier Awareness Group of Delaware County has awarded certificates of appreciation and recognition to people and organizations that have helped promote public understanding of problems faced by handicapped people. The certificates were presented at an awards ceremony June 22 at Taylor Hospital in Ridley Park. A certificate of appreciation was presented to Malcom Flint, refinery manager at Sun Refining & Marketing Co. in Marcus Hook, for providing Barrier Awareness with a place to hold a seminar.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Listening to pianist Marcus Roberts' newest release is like sitting through a boring music appreciation class, where the instructor must explain every nuance of a song before you can understand why the song is so important. But on "Blues for the New Millennium," even that's not enough. You're still left scratching your head. The question: What's the point? Roberts, a Wynton Marsalis protege, has taken the 12-bar happy blues and tried to put a '90s spin on them. Let's call it "retro neo blues.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An official proclamation of appreciation. And a $35 check sent, care of the borough hall, by a man in Hawaii. Those were the tokens of appreciation presented last night to Alan Brown, the Lindenwold resident who has earned fame for returning to its rightful owner a $10,000 savings bond he found in the pocket of a jacket he bought in a Roxborough thrift shop for $15. At last night's council meeting, the borough joined the ranks of about 50...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By A.J. Thomson
HE POINTS HIS BAT at the pitcher and says bring it - bring that weak stuff. This will be the indelible image of Ryan Howard in my mind, the mind of all of us here in Philadelphia who live and die with the Phils, or even those who chased that bandwagon and jumped on during the magical run. Such bad-assedness from a player was something that we hadn't seen here in the land of 10,000 losses in a long time, maybe never. With the extended bat pointed at the hurler, Howard readied to take all of Philadelphia's eyes on a magical arc to Ashburn Alley, the upper deck, or maybe to deep leftfield.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
News of the very last VHS VCR rolling off the Funai Electronics assembly line in Japan provoked headlines and comedy show gags last week - most with a derisive "Who remembers them?" slant. But VHS (and its longtime rival Betamax) were a really big deal - revolutionizing industries, user habits, and our comfort with technology. The VCR deserved a more respectful assessment, worthy of its significant place in viewing history. My suggestions follow. The great time machine story.
SPORTS
July 14, 2016 | By Paul Schwedelson, STAFF WRITER
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - Ivan Provorov lifted himself out of the water and several young fans holding a blank poster board larger than their bodies got in his way. They asked him for an autograph as he moved to the next stage of the challenge course. Another fan asked for a photo and another asked him to sign a shirt. As the young defenseman began walking away, an adult whispered to a child, "He's going to be really good. " Provorov, the seventh overall pick in the 2015 NHL draft, and more than 30 other Flyers prospects greeted fans throughout the day Tuesday as part of the team's Trial on the Isle event.
NEWS
July 11, 2016
Art Carey is a former Inquirer staff writer Few experiences are more sublime than watching the break of dawn from the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Maine. At 1,530 feet, Cadillac is the highest peak on the North Atlantic coast, and for much of the year, the first spot in the United States touched by the morning sun. Cadillac dominates Mount Desert Island and is the topographical centerpiece of Acadia National Park, which originated as a national monument on July 8, 1916, 100 years ago this summer.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The only questions Farhat Biviji doesn't like are the ones she doesn't get asked. "If you ask it, then I have an opportunity to address it," says Biviji, an observant Muslim who emigrated from India in 1970 and has lived in Cherry Hill since 1979. "Otherwise," she adds, "I don't get my say. " A Catholic education, a Jewish godmother, and 37 years of studying the Quran have provided Biviji, 63, with a lot to say about Islam, its deep connections with Christianity and Judaism, and its place in America and the world.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
Q uestion: I recently invited my sister to go out to dinner for her 86th birthday, a yearly event. Since she has several doctor appointments, I wasn't sure just what day would work for her, so I mentioned several options. On Christmas, I asked if she had made up her mind and this is the answer I received: "I don't make decisions anymore. " I bit my tongue to avoid an incident and went ahead to finalize the plans, but to me it was a slap in the face and I still resent the remark. Am I wrong for thinking this way?
NEWS
December 1, 2015
AMERICA doesn't care because young black men have been demonized and are seen as less than human to some people, especially those in power. We are constantly bombarded with images and stories of black men doing wrong without context or background info unless it involves prior criminal activity. When we get stories of whites committing crime there always seems to be a built-in excuse and back story, like the teacher who was having sex with her students. We found out how lonely she was. It's a big difference.
SPORTS
August 28, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JASON PETERS said quarterback Sam Bradford thanked him yesterday for Peters' strong comments condemning the Terrell Suggs hit on Bradford's twice-repaired left knee, in Saturday's Eagles preseason victory over the Ravens. The NFL decided the hit was legal and that Suggs shouldn't have been penalized. The Eagles have noted that previously, the standard seemed to be that a quarterback not carrying out a fake could not be hit. Now the standard seems to be that he is fair game for a period of time after handing off, trying to run a fake or not. Regardless, Peters and the Eagles aren't going to tolerate blatant attempts to injure their QB, and they don't seem to think they'll encounter a lot of them.
SPORTS
August 14, 2015 | By Bill Fleischman, Daily News Columnist
IF NASCAR were a kingdom, Buddy Baker would've been knighted. Sir Buddy Baker has a nice ring to it. Nah, that's not him. Baker (born Elzie Wylie Baker Jr.) was a self-described country boy. Born in Florence, S.C., he matured into an outstanding racer, with 19 Sprint Cup victories, and later was a respected and entertaining broadcaster. Following his death Monday, at age 74, from lung cancer, tributes have poured in for Baker. Racing contemporaries such as Richard Petty and Darrell Waltrip praised Baker.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
When he arrived at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital on a winter day in 2011, all Ousmane Barry knew about his new patient was what he had read in his file. Marvin Brown. 19. Gunshot victim. Quadriplegic. Barely talking. Deeply depressed. In constant pain. After months of surgeries that mended his body only enough for him to move his head, Marvin was to be released. He was going home to a small front room in his father's house in Southwest Philadelphia. Ousmane would be his primary nurse, his caretaker.
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