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Approval Rating

NEWS
October 3, 2001 | By RICHARD REEVES
In the first Gallup poll published after the disastrous invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs in April 1961, President John F. Kennedy's approval rating jumped 10 points to 83 percent. The commander in chief looked at the numbers - the disapproval was only 5 percent - and said, "The worse I do, the more popular I get. " Not exactly. But as President Bush learned when his approval rating touched 90 percent last week, Americans rally round the flag when it begins to dip. We may think of ourselves as being fiercely independent as individuals, but history comes down on the side of team spirit when the USA takes the field in crisis.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
A dead-heat poll serves up the bitter and the sweet in near-equal doses. The good news for Republican Sam Katz: "The No. 1 good news is that he's competitive in a city where his party faces a [nearly] 4-1 registration deficit," said pollster Terry Madonna. Katz benefits from "an enormous crossover of [Democratic] white voters. That makes him a viable candidate," Madonna said. That's reflected in the GOP candidate's break-even showing in union households (36-37) and his lead among Catholic voters (57-22)
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
It seems President Bush can't escape the country's woes - or his slipping popularity. During ceremonies yesterday marking the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Bush heard Dr. King's daughter, the Rev. Bernice King, bluntly describe the recession, racism and other domestic problems. Also, a new poll greeted Bush, showing him losing support in the South. During his remarks at the Martin Luther King Jr. Center, Bush hailed what he called the change in attitudes toward minorities.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | By Charles Green, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU The Baltimore Sun contributed to this article
An upset Democratic governor foiled an attempt yesterday by President Bush to use the nation's governors as props while he plugged his economic recovery plan. About 10 minutes into a meeting between Bush and the nation's governors, Colorado Gov. Roy Romer objected when White House aides began ushering out reporters immediately after the President concluded opening remarks promoting his tax and budget plan. "Could I ask the press not to leave yet?" interjected Romer. Complaining that "we need a new format here," Romer then launched into a criticism of Bush's budget, saying it contained "gimmicks," spent too much on defense and gave too many tax breaks to the rich.
NEWS
March 11, 1987 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A survey conducted by the Philadelphia Police Study Task Force to determine how area residents view the city's Police Department left the panel with what it called a "disturbing" paradox. "One the one hand, the police are viewed favorably by most Philadelphians," the task force concluded from a survey of 1,000 people. Overall, the citizenry awarded the police high or passing marks for their performance, such as responding to emergencies, controlling traffic and combating crime, according to the survey.
NEWS
November 22, 1986
The Democrats' capture of the Senate has set off a chorus of eulogies on the Reagan revolution. Liberal pundits claim that the President is a lame duck, that the public has repudiated his policies. Yet until Election Day these same "experts" asserted that the 1986 Senate races were devoid of national issues. This inconsistency reflects a profound misunderstanding of the Reagan presidency. These same liberals conveniently leave out of their analysis that the President's party won eight governorships - the first time in a modern off- year election that the party in power gained any statehouses.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
HOUSTON - George W. Bush is as hard to find in his father's office as he is in the 2012 presidential contest. The 43d president appears in a gold-framed picture tucked into a far corner of the room, partially hidden by a Texas flag and a cabinet door. The placement, whether intentional or not, is a reminder of the Republican presidential campaign and the lengths to which former Massachusets Gov. Mitt Romney and his rivals have tried to marginalize the two-term president. The younger Bush was an afterthought Thursday as his father, former President George H.W. Bush, met with Romney - until a reporter raised the issue.
NEWS
January 21, 2015
THE STATE of the Union address is a constitutional requirement, as well as a symbolic act whereby the current president pushes his ideas and agenda. But the real job of the State of the Union address is to provide a coherent narrative about who we are and how we are doing at this moment in time. This annual story - and our need for it - is more important some years than others. For example, George Bush's State of the Union following the 9/11 attacks was an important moment to reiterate the country's strengths.
NEWS
November 27, 2000
Is serving as governor a 24/7 job or merely a 9-to-5, Monday-to-Friday gig? Certainly, state leaders with ambitious agendas have been known to work around the clock and into the weekend lobbying for legislative approval. On the other hand, Texas' governor has been pretty distracted lately, and even Pennsylvania's own Gov. Ridge spent much of the year chasing political aspiration. Neither Austin nor Harrisburg has ground to a halt. But Minnesota's Jesse Ventura is challenging the time clock his usual surprising way. The former wrestler and sports announcer plans to moonlight as a color commentator for 10 games of the new Xtreme Football League, which debuts Feb. 3 on NBC-TV.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With the economy in the doldrums, banks failing, health-care costs soaring, his chief of staff and vice president the butt of jokes and Saddam Hussein still in power, who would have thought it possible? George Bush, an uninspiring orator who has been openly mocked as wimpy and ineffectual, has the highest public approval ratings of any president since John F. Kennedy nearly three decades ago. His 71 percent approval rating, as measured in a June Gallup poll, compares with a 43 percent score for Ronald Reagan, 29 percent for Jimmy Carter, 48 percent for Richard M. Nixon, 54 percent for Lyndon B. Johnson, 61 percent for Kennedy and 69 percent for Dwight D. Eisenhower at this point in their presidencies.
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