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NEWS
May 13, 1986
I reply to the April 30 Op-ed article by Mohamed Hakki. Will the Arabs ever think like Westerners? Mr. Hakki opened with a laudable, expansive denouncement of terrorism in order to soften our Western feelings and then commenced a vicious tirade against Israel and the United States as if we were the root cause of terrorism. It is well agreed that, even if Israel were not to exist at all, terrorism would still stalk us over the world; and, if the Arab states would absorb their brethren (as all the rest of the civilized world has done)
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "Arab solution" to the Kuwaiti crisis so desperately sought by the region's leaders seems as elusive today as it did the day Iraqi troops steamrollered into Kuwait. Despite all their state visits and all their intense phone calls to one another over the last five days, Arabs still have been unable to decide how to deal with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Their seeming indecision reflects their complex emotions over Iraq, Kuwait, the West and Israel. And with each passing day of indecision, there is an increasing likelihood of a Western solution undeterred by the mixed emotions that are inevitable any time a family member must be disciplined.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Ashraf Khalil FOR THE INQUIRER
Outside Muhammed Sherdi's office window one recent afternoon, workers were erecting a carpet-walled stage, assembling rows of chairs, and fiddling with a sound system. Egypt's oldest opposition political party, the Wafd, was host to an antiwar demonstration - one sure to feature harsh condemnations of American aggression. Meanwhile, inside, Sherdi reminisced about the things - "movies, shopping at Kmart, cold beer and potato salad on Sundays" - that enhance his regular visits to the United States.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | By Elie Chalala
Arabs today are remembering what they refer to as al-nakba, the "uprooting" and "catastrophe" that befell the Palestinians when Israel was carved out of their homeland in 1948. Arabs are still mourning. But this very mourning has produced other catastrophes in the Arab world, throwing culture into a state of paranoia, opening doors to ruthless dictatorships and laying waste to economies. The psychological disorder afflicting Arab cultural life since 1948 has not been healed by any peace agreement.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States may be scoring in the war against terrorism, but it stands in danger of losing the hearts and minds of the Arab world. In a sawdust-strewn cafe in the Giza district of Cairo, just off the road to the Pyramids, Mahmouh al-Sharif, 38, a math teacher, pores over the weekend newspaper. The front page fairly screams with a lurid color photo of a badly burned victim of the air strike in Sudan. Below it are a photo of Monica Lewinsky and yet another of a demonstrator holding a poster that reads: "No War for Monica.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | by Donald M. Rothberg, Associated Press
The rumor races through the streets of the Arab world: Madeleine Albright is Jewish. It is accepted, regardless of the fact that President Clinton's choice for secretary of state was born Catholic and is now Episcopalian. The religion rumor is one more unpleasant sign of what lies ahead as Albright tries to breathe new life into the Middle East peace process. At the same time, authorities on the region do not think she will have difficulty because of who she is. Or, in the case of the rumor, who she is not. "Any secretary of state would have a hard time simply because of the issues," said Richard Haass, who was director of Middle East affairs on the National Security Council during the Bush administration.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Libyan rebels are pushed back by the forces of the mad Col. Moammar Gadhafi, we're all rooting for the underdog. Even though we know little about the rebels and their leaders, we assume they'd be an improvement over the crazed colonel. But that emotional tug doesn't justify the proposal by three influential senators - Republicans Mitch McConnell and John McCain, and Democrat John Kerry - that we set up a no-fly zone over Libya to prevent Gadhafi from bombing his own people. As the Pentagon (which opposes the idea)
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Jonathan Power
The elections in Palestine today are not just a historic opportunity for Palestinians and for Yasir Arafat, but for the whole of the Arab world for whom democracy is almost a forbidden fruit. If Egypt's election in December showed that too much of the modern Arab tendency is ever further toward dictatorship and absolutism, this vote, along with Algeria's recent presidential election, could well root the tree of liberty for the millions of would-be Arab democrats who believe the time has now come to construct open and pluralistic societies.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For someone who has covered the Arab world for 40 years, the middle-class Tunisian revolt was exhilarating. Especially gripping was the fact that the youthful women demonstrators were unveiled, and the young men did not wear beards. They talked about practical things such as reforming the economy and ending corruption. For a moment, one could dream. It almost seemed possible that Tunisia might produce the element whose absence has doomed so many Arab efforts to achieve democracy: a pragmatic political movement with concrete goals that is neither Islamist nor based on tribe or sect.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Samer Abboud
A series of important facts have been lost in the controversy surrounding Dubai Port World's purchase of the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. This negligence has forced a narrowing of the debate surrounding its potential impact on the United States and the nation's security. The debate has also exposed a rather ugly xenophobic vein of post-9/11 American political culture. Opposition to the deal is being used as an opportunity for politicians to further their own domestic agendas by capitalizing on the prejudices and fears of the electorate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many times have you looked at news reports from Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, or Syria and thought, "How come they can't keep it together?" How is it the elite in Arab countries can't move beyond repressive regimes? How come they haven't discovered democracy yet? How many of us have fantasized, "If only I were king, I'd figure it all out"? With FX's political soap opera Tyrant , created by Gideon Raff, the Israeli TV wunderkind responsible for Prisoners of War and its American remake, Homeland , we got a chance to do just that: take a struggling, oil- and mineral-rich desert dictatorship and guide her to freedom.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the fourth anniversary of Egypt's Tahrir Square uprising, which became the hallmark of the Arab Spring. As though to mock those long-dead hopes, Yemen and Libya have collapsed, Syria lies in ruins, and much of Syria and Iraq are occupied by ISIS. Several youthful leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, revolt have been jailed (while the Egyptian leader they ousted, Hosni Mubarak, was just freed from prison). The death last week of Saudi Arabian King Abdullah - whose successor is also old and ill - adds to the turmoil in the region.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - Secretary of State John Kerry won Arab League backing Wednesday for his effort to restart Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, raising hopes that the stalled negotiations could resume. Kerry cited significant progress in narrowing gaps between the two sides, but he declined to elaborate. On his sixth trip to the Middle East in as many months as America's top diplomat, Kerry met in Jordan with representatives of the Arab League and nine of its members that support an Arab-Israeli peace plan proposed by Saudi Arabia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By William Booth, Washington Post
KHAN YOUNIS, Gaza Strip - Arab Idol is an over-the-top TV ratings smash in the Middle East, and a young crooner from a Palestinian refugee family, whom admirers have nicknamed "the Rocket," is stealing the show. The surprise breakout of the second season is a 23-year-old Gaza Strip resident named Mohammed Assaf, whose patriotic folk songs and romantic ballads - with their themes of grit, longing, and love - have propelled him into the final rounds. "I think this shows the world there are many normal people in Gaza, that Gaza is not just this place of terrorists and criminals but nice people," said Ala'a Nabrees, 22, a longtime friend.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's prime minister gave a cool reception Wednesday to a new Arab Mideast peace initiative, saying the conflict with the Palestinians was not about territory but rather the Palestinians' refusal to recognize Israel as the Jewish homeland. The remarks signaled trouble for Secretary of State John Kerry's new push for Mideast peace and risked reinforcing Benjamin Netanyahu's image as a hard-liner unwilling to make the tough concessions required for peace. Netanyahu has not commented directly on the Arab League's latest initiative, but his words questioned its central tenet - the exchange of captured land for peace - and appeared to counter a modified peace proposal from the Arab world that Washington and Netanyahu's own chief negotiator have welcomed.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It began with an idea for a summer camp - a handful of kids getting a taste of Arab music and language for a few weeks at the Morris Arboretum, in the troubled times after 9/11. From a tiny beginning - the first camp, 10 years ago, attracted 18 children - Al Bustan Seeds of Culture has flowered into something unique in the United States, an organization that: maintains a resident ensemble of first-rate musicians versed in classical Arab music; offers a professional performance and residency series throughout the year with internationally known guest artists; conducts educational programs for adults and children alike; works with the Philadelphia School District to bring Arab language and music to the schools.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aaron Shneyer's contribution to mediating conflict in the Middle East began with 12 teens and a jam session in Jerusalem. The Georgetown University graduate brought together a dozen Israeli and Palestinian musicians as part of a Fulbright-mtvU project that used music to foster dialogue and understanding. The result is Heartbeat, a peace-building collaboration that has been exported to the United States and will find its way to Congregation Beth Am Israel in Penn Valley on Thursday evening.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
By Moncef Marzouki The futurist Alvin Toffler used to say that when a society reaches a certain degree of development, democracy becomes a technical necessity, not simply an ethical one. But this rule didn't seem to apply to the Arab world. Industrialization failed, "modernity" arrived late due to colonization, and when a democratic wave destroyed dictatorships in Latin America and Eastern Europe, little happened in North Africa and the Middle East. Racists pointed to the wrong cause for this phenomenon, citing the culture.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The Palestinian prime minister warned Sunday that his government could fail to meet its obligations to its people because of a cash crunch, and urged Arab countries to deliver on promised aid. Salam Fayyad met with Arab League members to discuss ways to raise the $100 million they pledged earlier to his Palestinian Authority. Arab League chief Nabil Elaraby said seven countries have responded favorably, but he did not name them. League foreign ministers meeting in Cairo decided to dispatch a delegation to the region to raise the funds the Palestinian government needs to make ends meet.
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