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NEWS
May 13, 1986
I reply to the April 30 Op-ed article by Mohamed Hakki. Will the Arabs ever think like Westerners? Mr. Hakki opened with a laudable, expansive denouncement of terrorism in order to soften our Western feelings and then commenced a vicious tirade against Israel and the United States as if we were the root cause of terrorism. It is well agreed that, even if Israel were not to exist at all, terrorism would still stalk us over the world; and, if the Arab states would absorb their brethren (as all the rest of the civilized world has done)
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "Arab solution" to the Kuwaiti crisis so desperately sought by the region's leaders seems as elusive today as it did the day Iraqi troops steamrollered into Kuwait. Despite all their state visits and all their intense phone calls to one another over the last five days, Arabs still have been unable to decide how to deal with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Their seeming indecision reflects their complex emotions over Iraq, Kuwait, the West and Israel. And with each passing day of indecision, there is an increasing likelihood of a Western solution undeterred by the mixed emotions that are inevitable any time a family member must be disciplined.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Ashraf Khalil FOR THE INQUIRER
Outside Muhammed Sherdi's office window one recent afternoon, workers were erecting a carpet-walled stage, assembling rows of chairs, and fiddling with a sound system. Egypt's oldest opposition political party, the Wafd, was host to an antiwar demonstration - one sure to feature harsh condemnations of American aggression. Meanwhile, inside, Sherdi reminisced about the things - "movies, shopping at Kmart, cold beer and potato salad on Sundays" - that enhance his regular visits to the United States.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | By Elie Chalala
Arabs today are remembering what they refer to as al-nakba, the "uprooting" and "catastrophe" that befell the Palestinians when Israel was carved out of their homeland in 1948. Arabs are still mourning. But this very mourning has produced other catastrophes in the Arab world, throwing culture into a state of paranoia, opening doors to ruthless dictatorships and laying waste to economies. The psychological disorder afflicting Arab cultural life since 1948 has not been healed by any peace agreement.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States may be scoring in the war against terrorism, but it stands in danger of losing the hearts and minds of the Arab world. In a sawdust-strewn cafe in the Giza district of Cairo, just off the road to the Pyramids, Mahmouh al-Sharif, 38, a math teacher, pores over the weekend newspaper. The front page fairly screams with a lurid color photo of a badly burned victim of the air strike in Sudan. Below it are a photo of Monica Lewinsky and yet another of a demonstrator holding a poster that reads: "No War for Monica.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | by Donald M. Rothberg, Associated Press
The rumor races through the streets of the Arab world: Madeleine Albright is Jewish. It is accepted, regardless of the fact that President Clinton's choice for secretary of state was born Catholic and is now Episcopalian. The religion rumor is one more unpleasant sign of what lies ahead as Albright tries to breathe new life into the Middle East peace process. At the same time, authorities on the region do not think she will have difficulty because of who she is. Or, in the case of the rumor, who she is not. "Any secretary of state would have a hard time simply because of the issues," said Richard Haass, who was director of Middle East affairs on the National Security Council during the Bush administration.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As Libyan rebels are pushed back by the forces of the mad Col. Moammar Gadhafi, we're all rooting for the underdog. Even though we know little about the rebels and their leaders, we assume they'd be an improvement over the crazed colonel. But that emotional tug doesn't justify the proposal by three influential senators - Republicans Mitch McConnell and John McCain, and Democrat John Kerry - that we set up a no-fly zone over Libya to prevent Gadhafi from bombing his own people. As the Pentagon (which opposes the idea)
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Jonathan Power
The elections in Palestine today are not just a historic opportunity for Palestinians and for Yasir Arafat, but for the whole of the Arab world for whom democracy is almost a forbidden fruit. If Egypt's election in December showed that too much of the modern Arab tendency is ever further toward dictatorship and absolutism, this vote, along with Algeria's recent presidential election, could well root the tree of liberty for the millions of would-be Arab democrats who believe the time has now come to construct open and pluralistic societies.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For someone who has covered the Arab world for 40 years, the middle-class Tunisian revolt was exhilarating. Especially gripping was the fact that the youthful women demonstrators were unveiled, and the young men did not wear beards. They talked about practical things such as reforming the economy and ending corruption. For a moment, one could dream. It almost seemed possible that Tunisia might produce the element whose absence has doomed so many Arab efforts to achieve democracy: a pragmatic political movement with concrete goals that is neither Islamist nor based on tribe or sect.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Samer Abboud
A series of important facts have been lost in the controversy surrounding Dubai Port World's purchase of the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. This negligence has forced a narrowing of the debate surrounding its potential impact on the United States and the nation's security. The debate has also exposed a rather ugly xenophobic vein of post-9/11 American political culture. Opposition to the deal is being used as an opportunity for politicians to further their own domestic agendas by capitalizing on the prejudices and fears of the electorate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
History has shown us that chaos follows the fall of a strongman. A power vacuum sparks competition among the ambitious, who often lack the juice to adequately replace the deposed despot. Which brings us to the first floor of Philadelphia's City Hall, where the three elected officials who supervise the city's elections are enduring their own version of an Arab Spring. It has been four years since Margaret Tartaglione, a politician so well-known that you can still just say "Marge" and everyone in City Hall knows who you're talking about, ended her reign as chairwoman of the City Commissioners after losing her bid for a 10th term.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In this Christmas season, Christian Arabs are under threat as never before in the region where Jesus and Christianity were born. In reality, Christian communities in the Mideast have been endangered for years, but their sufferings only grabbed U.S. attention in the era of ISIS - and in an election year. This has sparked a political debate over how to help them. Sen. Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush are proposing to admit only Christian refugees from Syria and Iraq - and exclude Muslims. Conservatives claim the administration is actively discriminating against Syrian Christians, since there are only 53 Christians among the 2,184 Syrian refugees admitted since 2011.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The music isn't likely to sound like anything most Americans have heard: The polarities between Arab and Western music, both obvious and subtle, are such that their fusion in this Saturday's concert, Words Adorned: Andalusian Poetry and Music, at Bryn Mawr College might seem impossible. Then it becomes perfectly doable. "It's supposed to blend the sounds of this pluralistic, cosmopolitan city," said Hanna Khoury, music director of Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture Music Program, which instigated the year-in-the-planning concert with the Crossing choir in works by two Syrian-born composers.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System has agreed to help VPS Healthcare, a health system based in the United Arab Emirates, improve the care of patients with lifestyle-related disease, such as diabetes, and cancer, VPS said Monday.. No terms were disclosed. As part of the partnership, Penn will help VPS develop educational conferences, standards for patient care, as well as continuing medical education for physicians, nurses and other allied health professionals. VPS operates 14 hospitals in the Middle East, Europe, and India.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
We hear so much about the uneasy relationship across the Israeli-Palestinian divide that we tend to forget that fully 20 percent of Israeli citizens are Arab. What does it mean to be an Israeli Arab (or Arab Israeli)? Is that an identity - or a recipe for inner discord? These are just some of the tantalizing questions raised in the Israeli import A Borrowed Identity , an extraordinary coming-of-age story about Eyad, a Palestinian boy from a small village who grows up to become a cosmopolitan Israeli.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY TIRDAD DERAKHSHANI, Inquirer Staff Writer tirdad@phillynews.com, 215-854-2736
WE HEAR so much about the uneasy relationship across the Israeli-Palestinian divide that we tend to forget that fully 20 percent of Israeli citizens are Arab. What does it mean to be an Israeli Arab (or Arab Israeli)? Is that an identity - or a recipe for inner discord? These are just some of the tantalizing questions raised in the Israeli import "A Borrowed Identity," an extraordinary coming-of-age story about Eyad, a Palestinian boy from a small village who grows up to become a cosmopolitan Israeli.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many times have you looked at news reports from Iraq, Afghanistan, Egypt, or Syria and thought, "How come they can't keep it together?" How is it the elite in Arab countries can't move beyond repressive regimes? How come they haven't discovered democracy yet? How many of us have fantasized, "If only I were king, I'd figure it all out"? With FX's political soap opera Tyrant , created by Gideon Raff, the Israeli TV wunderkind responsible for Prisoners of War and its American remake, Homeland , we got a chance to do just that: take a struggling, oil- and mineral-rich desert dictatorship and guide her to freedom.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the fourth anniversary of Egypt's Tahrir Square uprising, which became the hallmark of the Arab Spring. As though to mock those long-dead hopes, Yemen and Libya have collapsed, Syria lies in ruins, and much of Syria and Iraq are occupied by ISIS. Several youthful leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, revolt have been jailed (while the Egyptian leader they ousted, Hosni Mubarak, was just freed from prison). The death last week of Saudi Arabian King Abdullah - whose successor is also old and ill - adds to the turmoil in the region.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - Secretary of State John Kerry won Arab League backing Wednesday for his effort to restart Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, raising hopes that the stalled negotiations could resume. Kerry cited significant progress in narrowing gaps between the two sides, but he declined to elaborate. On his sixth trip to the Middle East in as many months as America's top diplomat, Kerry met in Jordan with representatives of the Arab League and nine of its members that support an Arab-Israeli peace plan proposed by Saudi Arabia.
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