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Arab Spring

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NEWS
January 22, 2012
A year ago, in the opening days of what would become known as the Arab Spring, Tunisian Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi was announcing that he would leave politics after presidential elections were held. But demonstrations forced him to resign a month later and similar protests spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East. Match the listed Arab country that experienced demonstrations or more in the last year with its letter on the map. Answers: C3. 1. Algeria 2. Bahrain 3. Egypt 4. Iraq 5. Jordan 6. Kuwait 7. Libya 8. Morocco 9. Oman 10. Saudi Arabia 11. Syria 12. Tunisia 13. Yemen
NEWS
August 14, 2011
Austin Bay is the author of Ataturk: Lessons in Leadership From the Greatest General of the Ottoman Empire, published this month by Palgrave/Macmillan The pragmatic visionary is a rare individual, particularly one with the iron will required to attain revolutionary political power and the liberalizing genius to construct a political system capable of evolving, prospering, and inspiring long after the gifted personality is gone. Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey, combined culture-shaping vision - understanding change often entailed centuries of struggle - with the shrewd pragmatism that day-to-day tactical politics demands.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Charles Krauthammer
Postrevolutionary Libya appears to have elected a relatively moderate, pro-Western government. Good news, but tentative because Libya is less a country than an oil well with a long beach and myriad tribes. Popular allegiance to a central national authority is weak. Even if the government of Mahmoud Jibril is able to rein in the militias and establish a functioning democracy, it will be the Arab Spring exception. Consider:   Tunisia and Morocco, the most Westernized of all Arab countries, elected Islamist governments — moderate, to be sure, but Islamist still.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Images of Moammar Gadhafi's bloodied body flashed on TV screens across the world may send shivers down the spines of Syria's Bashar al-Assad and Yemen's Ali Abdullah Saleh, two leaders clinging to power amid Arab Spring uprisings. For the millions of Arabs yearning for freedom, democracy, and new leadership, the death of one of the region's most brutal dictators will likely inspire and invigorate the movement for change. Gadhafi's death sent ripples across the Arab world and set the Internet's social networks abuzz with comments, mostly celebrating the demise of a leader whose bizarre behavior over the years defined the woes of an Arab world mostly ruled by autocratic or despotic leaders.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
What comes after the Arab Spring? Commentary by Trudy Rubin, A2.
NEWS
August 5, 2011
By Raslan Abu Rukun A recent CNN documentary featured correspondent Amber Lyon reporting on the dramatic democratic upheavals in Tunisia, Bahrain, and Egypt. Lyon offered an inside look at the lives of young activists armed only with the weapons of digital media: computers, cellphones, social networks, and so on. Lyon focused in particular on three young idealists who leveraged technology to expose injustice and violence in despotic countries. It's hard not to admire these people, whose narratives parallel biblical stories of victories against all odds.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Last week, I bumped into one of my students on her way to the "Occupy America" protest near Wall Street. I told her I was glad she was participating in the most exciting political development I'd seen in years. "You're right," she replied cheerily. "It's like our own Arab Spring. " No, it isn't. Such analogies demean demonstrators in the Middle East, who have risked torture and death. And they discount America's rich tradition of free speech, which has been on vibrant display since the Occupy America movement began.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Lara Jakes And Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Sunni Muslim rulers largely shunned an Arab League summit hosted by Shiite-led Iraq on Thursday, illustrating how powerfully the sectarian split and the rivalry with Iran define Middle Eastern politics amid the Arab Spring. The crisis in Syria is the epicenter of those divisions. The one-day summit closed with a joint call on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to stop his bloody crackdown on an uprising seeking his ouster. But the final statement barely papered over the differences among the Arab nations over how to deal with the longest-running regional revolt.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
IN 2011, JOE CALTAGIRONE, a bartender/actor from Port Richmond, was watching TV coverage of angry "Arab Spring" crowds toppling leaders in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, when he suddenly flashed back 30 years. Caltagirone remembered being in a thrift store on Kensington Avenue in the 1980s, browsing through the "All Books 10 Cents" shelves, when he came upon an old Kensington High School for Girls library copy of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar. " Caltagirone, 61, remembers thinking, "When a book's down to 10 cents, it's two feet from the trash can. Caesar and Shakespeare for a dime!
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syria's neighbors have turned decisively against President Bashar al-Assad, launching a diplomatic campaign against his crackdown on the country's pro-democracy movement that analysts say could have a major effect on important pillars of Assad's support. Even as Syrian armed forces pushed against several opposition strongholds Monday, international action against the government mushroomed. Western countries so far have led efforts to stop the violent crackdown, including a U.N. Security Council statement last week that condemned the offensive.
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NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
History has shown us that chaos follows the fall of a strongman. A power vacuum sparks competition among the ambitious, who often lack the juice to adequately replace the deposed despot. Which brings us to the first floor of Philadelphia's City Hall, where the three elected officials who supervise the city's elections are enduring their own version of an Arab Spring. It has been four years since Margaret Tartaglione, a politician so well-known that you can still just say "Marge" and everyone in City Hall knows who you're talking about, ended her reign as chairwoman of the City Commissioners after losing her bid for a 10th term.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
IN 2011, JOE CALTAGIRONE, a bartender/actor from Port Richmond, was watching TV coverage of angry "Arab Spring" crowds toppling leaders in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, when he suddenly flashed back 30 years. Caltagirone remembered being in a thrift store on Kensington Avenue in the 1980s, browsing through the "All Books 10 Cents" shelves, when he came upon an old Kensington High School for Girls library copy of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar. " Caltagirone, 61, remembers thinking, "When a book's down to 10 cents, it's two feet from the trash can. Caesar and Shakespeare for a dime!
NEWS
April 15, 2014
IT WASN'T exactly "When Harry Met Sally" when Haleh met Shaul. Haleh Esfandiari and Shaul Bakhash are both Iranian, both highly and Western-educated, but Haleh is Muslim and Shaul is Jewish. When they planned to marry almost 50 years ago, before the Iranian Revolution turned the clock back to the Bronze Age, their families were shocked, says Shaul, but they got over it, says Haleh, "when they realized how much we loved each other and what sensible people we were. " They were married in a civil ceremony in Vienna in 1965.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last week, half-a-world away, Irvin Richter, 69, was visiting clients in United Arab Emirates, Oman and South Africa, trying to nail down deals worth tens of millions of dollars to his construction consulting company, Hill International Inc., in Marlton. The potential for reward is huge. So is the potential for risk. Ask Richter, Hill's chairman and chief executive, about trying to collect on a mostly unpaid $60 million bill from Libya. "They've since paid us a couple of million and we expect to be paid more soon," he said.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - So what does it all mean? Hillary Rodham Clinton has a deal for a memoir and policy book about her years in the Obama administration, Simon & Schuster told the Associated Press. The book has yet to be titled and is tentatively scheduled for June 2014, in time for the summer reading season and for the midterm elections, when a promotional tour could easily blend with Democratic efforts to recapture the House. The former secretary of state's itinerary will be closely scrutinized for any signs she may run for president in 2016 - any book-tour events in early voting states like Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina would receive broad attention.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
RE: "HOW TO fight 'their Islam,' " (Bykofsky, Sept. 14). I've spent a little over five years in the Middle East (Cairo, Beirut, Iraq, Amman and two other, lesser-known places). I understand the culture, the Quran, the economy and the prejudices/hatreds. I also understand there are a lot of "nice" people there not prone to violence for the sake of violence. Nevertheless, the region is prone to chaos. The violent chaos of revolt without a cause - what our ruling elite pronounced the "Arab Spring" - has yet to conclude.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
THE GARDENS of the Arab Spring are being watered by the blood of innocents. This week, American blood was added to the flow. U.S. ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens and three embassy staffers were murdered by Muslim jihadists who were presumably angry at a film that "defamed" Muhammad. The consulate in the city of Benghazi, site of last year's anti-Gaddafi insurgency, was set on fire, and the American victims were killed by a hail of rocket projectiles while attempting to flee to safety.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | Reviewed by Brendan Rastetter
Alif the Unseen By G. Willow Wilson Grove Press. 440 pp. $25   In Alif the Unseen , G. Willow Wilson, author of the Islamic self-discovery memoir The Butterfly Mosque , weaves the tale of a young Arab Indian hacker who goes by the handle Alif , the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. It's also a celebration of the place of women in Arab culture, and a highly accessible examination of the issues involved in the uprisings of the Arab Spring. Wilson tells Alif's story from the perspective of a jinn narrator.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Charles Krauthammer
Postrevolutionary Libya appears to have elected a relatively moderate, pro-Western government. Good news, but tentative because Libya is less a country than an oil well with a long beach and myriad tribes. Popular allegiance to a central national authority is weak. Even if the government of Mahmoud Jibril is able to rein in the militias and establish a functioning democracy, it will be the Arab Spring exception. Consider:   Tunisia and Morocco, the most Westernized of all Arab countries, elected Islamist governments — moderate, to be sure, but Islamist still.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
DOHA, Qatar — As the Arab Spring morphs into a hot Arab summer, activists around the region are debating whether Islamist parties and democracy can mix. Given the triumph of religious parties in parliamentary elections in Tunisia and Egypt, and the lead roles taken by Islamists in Libya, Yemen, and the Syrian opposition, Arab human rights activists have become increasingly nervous that their revolution will be hijacked. Nowhere is that debate more intense than in Egypt, where the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate is one of two finalists in presidential elections set for June 15 and 16. The Brotherhood already won 47 percent of the parliamentary seats in November; its success stems from its tight organization and loyal core of supporters.
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