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Arab World

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NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Robert B. Reich
This morning the cleanup and grieving continue, and America is getting back to work. Talk also continues about retribution and war. Some Americans are feeling impatient to strike back at those who participated in any way in these horrific events. There is mounting public pressure to retaliate against our enemies, to demonstrate our power and resolve. Gen. Henry Shelton, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says the American military stands ready. But it's still not clear exactly what the military stands ready to do, or should do. We don't know for sure who was responsible, although evidence points to Osama bin Laden, apparently still headquartered in Afghanistan.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | By Trudy Rubin
The war against al-Qaeda and the Taliban is beginning to stir up some fascinating debate in parts of the Arab world. You've heard of Arab newspapers filled with anti-American columns, and rumors that Israeli agents organized the bombing of the World Trade Center. But you probably haven't heard about a meeting of the Kuwaiti Graduates Society two weeks ago, in which 3,000 people came to hear liberal parliamentarians debate whether democracy could coexist with political Islam. The liberals argued that Kuwaiti Islamists were using democracy to achieve nondemocratic ends.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By ROBERT STEWART
MONEY CAN'T buy happiness - even, it seems, in oil-rich Arab countries. Though a new U.N. report shows that the Arab League nations have reduced poverty over the last decade, their lack of political freedom and educational advancement prevents them from keeping pace in terms of growth and per-capita income with even the poorest nations. It is precisely this lack of freedom that make such nations a ripe breeding ground for terrorism. "Poverty doesn't cause terrorism," President Bush said in his remarks to the Inter-American Development Bank in March, but when governments fail their people, "these failed states can become havens for terror.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a sweeping denunciation of Iran and an appeal for international action to end the gulf war, Arab leaders have taken an important step toward their longstanding dream of building a unified Arab political order. It would be risky to conclude that the Arab summit that ended Wednesday banished the arcane intrigues and impassioned feuds that have bedeviled Arab politics for a generation. But that prospect seems much more plausible now than it did before the emergency gathering, diplomats and other analysts said.
NEWS
July 17, 2001 | By Barbara Demick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amatzia Baram knows the streets of Baghdad so intimately that he can draw you a map from memory. He can describe in exhaustive detail a stroll along the banks of the Tigris River. But in fact, Baram has never been to Baghdad or anywhere else in Iraq, and is unlikely to go in the foreseeable future. That is because Baram is an Israeli, one of a unique breed of scholars who specialize in countries they are forbidden to visit. Israelis are keenly interested in their neighbors in the Middle East.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Zarqa, the country's second-largest city, voters ask candidates if they will pull strings to get a new library. In the southern town of Maan, Bedouin women wonder who can help them get their goat's milk and cheese to market. At debates and rallies leading up to today's parliamentary election, nary a mention is made of the Middle East peace process, Israel, pan-Arabism, American imperialism or any of the other ideological bugaboos that have dominated Arab political rhetoric for so many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2006 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER TV COLUMNIST
Al Jazeera is ready for America, but is America ready for Al Jazeera? The Al Jazeera Channel, the controversial Arab-language network that has emerged as the principal television news source in the Arab world, is going global with an international English-language spin-off designed for European and American audiences. Al Jazeera International has signed such mainstream talent as British interviewer David Frost, former Nightline correspondent Dave Marash, and ex-CNN anchor Riz Khan.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
New tune: Osama bin Laden's message of violent jihad has lost much of its luster in the Arab world. Trudy Rubin, A2.
NEWS
May 9, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Fresh from victory in Iraq, President Bush today will challenge the Arab world to embrace political and economic freedom as the fastest path to peace and stability in the Middle East. In a commencement address at the University of South Carolina, Bush also will outline plans for a Middle East free-trade zone that could ultimately link the economies of Israel and its Arab neighbors. The address signals Bush's determination to use the overthrow of Saddam Hussein as a catalyst for economic and political change throughout the region.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
I RESENT the pro-Palestinian propaganda that is trying to intimidate the U.S. because we support Israel. The majority of the Arab world is behaving like a mass of spoiled brats. Their hatred of Israel is nauseating and should not be rewarded by giving in to their demands, otherwise evil wins. Having lived in the Olney section of Philadelphia many years ago when I was a child, a number of neighbors and classmates were Jewish. We played together and got along very well. They became our doctors, nurses, our surgeons, our dentists, our lawyers and professionals in every phase of society and government - they excelled.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Those who criticize President Obama's weak foreign policy (as I have done often) have been looking for smarter ideas from prospective candidates for 2016. Judging by Lettergate - the bizarre tale of the missive sent by Sen. Tom Cotton and 46 Republican colleagues to Iran's ayatollahs - the Republicans aren't ready for prime time. Take a look at the broader implications of the letter and you'll see why. What was most disturbing about the letter was the carelessness with which it was dispatched.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
IT WASN'T exactly "When Harry Met Sally" when Haleh met Shaul. Haleh Esfandiari and Shaul Bakhash are both Iranian, both highly and Western-educated, but Haleh is Muslim and Shaul is Jewish. When they planned to marry almost 50 years ago, before the Iranian Revolution turned the clock back to the Bronze Age, their families were shocked, says Shaul, but they got over it, says Haleh, "when they realized how much we loved each other and what sensible people we were. " They were married in a civil ceremony in Vienna in 1965.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Secretary of State John Kerry has done Israelis and Palestinians a huge favor by pushing them to make one last try at negotiating a two-state solution. After months of effort, Kerry will soon present a draft framework meant to serve as a basis for a final agreement. Critics such as Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon have called Kerry's project "obsessive and messianic. " Although those remarks were quickly refuted by Prime Minisiter Benjamin Netanyahu, Ya'alon was correct: You really do have to be mad to try to close the current gap between Israelis and Palestinians.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israel's prime minister gave a cool reception Wednesday to a new Arab Mideast peace initiative, saying the conflict with the Palestinians was not about territory but rather the Palestinians' refusal to recognize Israel as the Jewish homeland. The remarks signaled trouble for Secretary of State John Kerry's new push for Mideast peace and risked reinforcing Benjamin Netanyahu's image as a hard-liner unwilling to make the tough concessions required for peace. Netanyahu has not commented directly on the Arab League's latest initiative, but his words questioned its central tenet - the exchange of captured land for peace - and appeared to counter a modified peace proposal from the Arab world that Washington and Netanyahu's own chief negotiator have welcomed.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
JERUSALEM - President Obama urged Israelis on Thursday to move decisively in a spirit of self-preservation and empathy to secure a lasting peace, but he delivered an even sharper ultimatum to Palestinians to drop conditions that have held up a new round of negotiations. His evening address at the Jerusalem International Convention Center signaled a shift away from the balance he has sought to maintain between Israeli and Palestinian leaders since taking office - and toward Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, with whom he has had a stormy relationship, at least until this trip.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
By Moncef Marzouki The futurist Alvin Toffler used to say that when a society reaches a certain degree of development, democracy becomes a technical necessity, not simply an ethical one. But this rule didn't seem to apply to the Arab world. Industrialization failed, "modernity" arrived late due to colonization, and when a democratic wave destroyed dictatorships in Latin America and Eastern Europe, little happened in North Africa and the Middle East. Racists pointed to the wrong cause for this phenomenon, citing the culture.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Aaron David Miller
Here we go again. That strange coalition of neocons and liberal interventionists is clamoring once more for a more muscular U.S. approach to Syria. And, unsurprisingly, they're looking to blame someone for "losing" the country.   Don't believe any of it. The time for guilting the United States into expensive, ill-thought-out military interventions has passed. The reasons to intervene in Syria — to defuse a bloody conflict and deal the Iranian mullahs a mortal blow — are just not compelling enough to offset the risks and unknowns.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In April, the prize-winning New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid was asked, on the NPR talk show On Point , why he kept taking terrible risks to cover conflicts in the Middle East. "I kind of wonder if it's irresponsible of you," a caller mused out loud. "Why would someone put themselves in such a situation?" Shadid, in his typically modest fashion, admitted this was "a perfectly legitimate question. " Then he replied slowly, "I felt that if I wasn't there, the story wouldn't be told.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
O NE WEEK after Holocaust Remembrance Day, the carnival of hate known as the National Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Conference arrives at the University of Pennsylvania today, its clown car stocked with lies, half-lies, white lies and bald-faced lies, playing to the ignorant. It gets no sympathy from Penn, which rejects its theme. Penn believes in free speech, as does Israel, the target of the hate fest. Free speech, and most human rights embedded in Western societies, are absent in Arab states.
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