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Arab World

NEWS
August 28, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a flashlight beam illuminating one corner of a darkened room, the West is focused on Saddam Hussein to the exclusion of the rest of the Arab world. Hussein has been spotlighted as the cause - rather than a symptom - of Middle East turmoil. Again, one man has become the symbol of evil incarnate, as Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser, Libya's Moammar Gadhafi and Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini were villains of the moment before him. But in a sense, there are two wars being waged, and all indicators point to two totally different outcomes.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | By Jocelyne Zablit, Inquirer Gulf Staff Inquirer Gulf correspondent Carol Rosenberg in Amman contributed to this report, as did Nick B. Williams Jr. and Daniel Williams of the Los Angeles Times
The reaction of Arab governments to the ground war against Iraq was strongly divided yesterday, enhancing fissures in the Arab world that have grown wider since the war began. Many diplomats and analysts - both Western and Arab - feared that the crisis might have created lasting divisions within the Arab world and could foster bitter anti-Western resentment. Jordan's information minister, Ibrahim Izzedin, predicted that the region would be gripped by a "prolonged period of suspicion, tension and bad feeling.
NEWS
August 5, 2011
By Raslan Abu Rukun A recent CNN documentary featured correspondent Amber Lyon reporting on the dramatic democratic upheavals in Tunisia, Bahrain, and Egypt. Lyon offered an inside look at the lives of young activists armed only with the weapons of digital media: computers, cellphones, social networks, and so on. Lyon focused in particular on three young idealists who leveraged technology to expose injustice and violence in despotic countries. It's hard not to admire these people, whose narratives parallel biblical stories of victories against all odds.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
By Moncef Marzouki The futurist Alvin Toffler used to say that when a society reaches a certain degree of development, democracy becomes a technical necessity, not simply an ethical one. But this rule didn't seem to apply to the Arab world. Industrialization failed, "modernity" arrived late due to colonization, and when a democratic wave destroyed dictatorships in Latin America and Eastern Europe, little happened in North Africa and the Middle East. Racists pointed to the wrong cause for this phenomenon, citing the culture.
NEWS
August 13, 2006
Israel Insider http://web.israelinsider.com When does the Arab world band together? Never to offer praise and rejoice because of the good that has happened to them, only to rejoice because bad has happened to someone else. The Arab world gathers together in hatred. They gather because of the United States and because of Israel. The Muslim world is galvanized because of the story line in a movie, the lyrics of a song, because of caricatures in a newspaper. They are moved to action because of perceived insult and evil, principally insults and evils interpreted to be hurled at them by the West.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
By Michal Levertov When the Tel Aviv-based musician Noy Alooshe decided to create an ironic dance remix of a speech by Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, he never imagined it would become a huge YouTube hit in the Arab world. Not only has the video attracted more than 5.5 million hits, but television footage showed Libyan rebels advancing into Tripoli being greeting by locals chanting "zenga zenga" - words from Alooshe's remix. The title, "Zenga Zenga," comes from Gadhafi's repetition of the Libyan Arabic word for "alleyways" in the speech used in the video clip.
NEWS
October 14, 2005 | Robert Robb
Robert Robb is a columnist at the Arizona Republic President Bush has a very expansive view of what the United States needs to do to protect the country against terrorist attack, more fully articulated in his speech to the National Endowment for Democracy on Oct. 6 than ever before. The question is whether it is all truly necessary, or at least prudent, or whether it is overreaching and excessively risky. Certain core activities are inarguably necessary to protect the country against terrorist attack.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d is flying around the Middle East looking for peace. Purveyors of conventional wisdom, entirely unembarrassed for having gotten the Persian Gulf war so spectacularly wrong, have new advice for him: Now that the war is over, a solution to the Palestinian problem is of particular urgency to the United States. They offer reasons: Because we owe it to our Arab coalition partners. Excuse me, but we saved them. If there are debts to be paid, one would think the United States should be collecting.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | By TRUDY RUBIN
One of the hardest things to understand about the Persian Gulf crisis is the reaction in the Arab world. Instead of rising up in anger when one among them gobbled up another, they have quarreled and dithered. Even our closest Arab allies, such as Morocco and Egypt, haven't yet agreed to send troops to Saudi Arabia, and an emergency Arab summit scheduled for yesterday was postponed until today. Most bewildering to many Americans, the television news is filled with scenes of Arab men-in-the street cheering the murderous Saddam Hussein on as the new hero of the Arab nation.
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