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Arabian Sea

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NEWS
October 17, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Three U.S. warships are in position to destroy Iran's northern Silkworm missile base with cruise missiles if the Reagan administration decides to retaliate for the Iranian missile attack on a U.S.-flagged tanker in Kuwaiti waters, defense officials said yesterday. Pentagon strategists rattled off a list of potential targets for U.S. retaliation. They also indicated that any attack probably would be carried out with missiles launched from Navy ships rather than aircraft, to avoid U.S. casualties.
NEWS
December 13, 2002
It's difficult to know why Yemen felt it needed Scud missiles. . . . Even if the missiles bought from North Korea make Yemen feel more secure, the country's history as a haven for al-Qaeda members and launching pad for anti-Western violence raises fears that the weapons could fall into the hands of terrorists. The terror connection is what set bells clanging upon the discovery of more than a dozen Scud missiles aboard a ship flying no nation's flag in the Arabian Sea, apparently headed for impoverished Yemen.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Screaming would have been futile. With the wind and the waves and the rumble of the ship, Marine Lance Cpl. Zachary R. Mayo's puny cries would never have been heard, superiors would say later. About all Mayo could do after tumbling into the ocean from the deck of his aircraft carrier was watch in horror as the 81,000-ton vessel receded into the darkness, leaving him alone in the vastness of the Arabian Sea. He might also have prayed, for the odds of his survival were nil. But last weekend, Mayo, 20, the only child of an Osburn, Idaho, silver miner, kept his cool, inflated his uniform into a life preserver, and floated for two days and two nights until he was picked up by a Pakistani fishing boat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2002 | New York Daily News
Tom Brokaw's NBC contract expires this summer, and while there has been speculation about his future in the anchor chair, his work load lately gives no indication he's ready to leave. Besides his regular job, he will present a one-hour documentary, "Ship at War: Inside the Carrier Stennis," about the vessel now stationed in the Arabian Sea, at 8 p.m. tomorrow. He spent two days on the Stennis after a week working in Lebanon and Israel. That's an unlikely schedule for a person looking to cut back.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
Here's a favorite freeze-frame from Sunday's Eagles game, the last regular-season NFL game ever at Veterans Stadium: It's late in the third quarter. As the team's lovable, accidental quarterback, A.J. Feeley, points, yells and shimmies in exultation, the man to whom he has just thrown a dart of a touchdown pass, Antonio Freeman, looks into the frothing stands. He searches out his brother, Marine Sgt. Clarence Freeman, just back from combat duty in the Arabian Sea, to whom he will give the touchdown ball.
NEWS
April 9, 1986
This letter replies to Paul Auerbach's comments against the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia (Letters to the Editor, March 28). I disagree with the contention that "in terms of logic, morals, or self-interest" there is little reason to support the sale of arms to moderate Arab states. Mr. Auerbach confuses Israeli national self-interest with America's. The two are not the same, and any similarities are purely coincidental. It is in America's best interest to broaden its base of support in the Middle East, to preserve its access to oil supplies and strategic waterways, to secure landing rights for our planes and naval vessels.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia is filled with old, venerable institutions. And sometimes they just fold and disappear without a proper obituary. Today we consider three once well-known schools with fine reputations that faded from the scene with little or no fanfare. SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE: This renowned trade and technical school was born in 1851 and died 141 years later in 1992. In 1851 Spring Garden was an independent district, outside the city's limits. It created the institute to "improve the moral and intellectual conditions of the youth of the district.
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Zacarias Moussaoui stunned a Virginia courtroom yesterday, declaring he was a member of the al Qaeda network and has "certain knowledge" of the Sept. 11 attacks. The development came as the French citizen, acting as his own attorney, tried to plead guilty to charges of conspiracy in the attacks on New York and Washington. "I, Moussaoui Zacarias, in the interests to preserve my life, enter with full conscience a plea of guilty," he said at an arraignment in Arlington. "I am a member of al Qaeda.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's hard to think of Philadelphia as the "The Quaker City" since there are only a few thousand Quakers still living here. The nickname "City of Homes" is hard to take seriously with so many blighted neighborhoods. But no one can quibble with the title "City of Firsts. " We've produced hundreds - maybe thousands - of "firsts. " Here are a few important and a few off-beat Philadelphia firsts: OPEN-HEART SURGERY Jefferson University and Dr. John H. Gibbons made worldwide news May 6, 1953, when the surgeon used the heart-lung machine he developed to perform the world's first open-heart surgery.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a moment rife with dread, surprise, panic, suspense. In Captain Phillips , Paul Greengrass' white-knuckle reenactment of the 2009 hijacking of a U.S.-flagged freighter in the Arabian Sea, four Somali pirates take the bridge of the Maersk Alabama. It is the first time that Muse , the lean, stone-eyed leader of the marauders, and Richard Phillips , the mariner in charge of the giant container vessel, meet. And for Greengrass, it was a doubly crucial moment.
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NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a moment rife with dread, surprise, panic, suspense. In Captain Phillips , Paul Greengrass' white-knuckle reenactment of the 2009 hijacking of a U.S.-flagged freighter in the Arabian Sea, four Somali pirates take the bridge of the Maersk Alabama. It is the first time that Muse , the lean, stone-eyed leader of the marauders, and Richard Phillips , the mariner in charge of the giant container vessel, meet. And for Greengrass, it was a doubly crucial moment.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
Here's a favorite freeze-frame from Sunday's Eagles game, the last regular-season NFL game ever at Veterans Stadium: It's late in the third quarter. As the team's lovable, accidental quarterback, A.J. Feeley, points, yells and shimmies in exultation, the man to whom he has just thrown a dart of a touchdown pass, Antonio Freeman, looks into the frothing stands. He searches out his brother, Marine Sgt. Clarence Freeman, just back from combat duty in the Arabian Sea, to whom he will give the touchdown ball.
NEWS
December 13, 2002
It's difficult to know why Yemen felt it needed Scud missiles. . . . Even if the missiles bought from North Korea make Yemen feel more secure, the country's history as a haven for al-Qaeda members and launching pad for anti-Western violence raises fears that the weapons could fall into the hands of terrorists. The terror connection is what set bells clanging upon the discovery of more than a dozen Scud missiles aboard a ship flying no nation's flag in the Arabian Sea, apparently headed for impoverished Yemen.
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Zacarias Moussaoui stunned a Virginia courtroom yesterday, declaring he was a member of the al Qaeda network and has "certain knowledge" of the Sept. 11 attacks. The development came as the French citizen, acting as his own attorney, tried to plead guilty to charges of conspiracy in the attacks on New York and Washington. "I, Moussaoui Zacarias, in the interests to preserve my life, enter with full conscience a plea of guilty," he said at an arraignment in Arlington. "I am a member of al Qaeda.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2002 | New York Daily News
Tom Brokaw's NBC contract expires this summer, and while there has been speculation about his future in the anchor chair, his work load lately gives no indication he's ready to leave. Besides his regular job, he will present a one-hour documentary, "Ship at War: Inside the Carrier Stennis," about the vessel now stationed in the Arabian Sea, at 8 p.m. tomorrow. He spent two days on the Stennis after a week working in Lebanon and Israel. That's an unlikely schedule for a person looking to cut back.
NEWS
January 14, 2002 | By Tom Infield and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
American combat troops began arriving in the Philippines last week, the vanguard of a significantly expanded U.S. program to train the Filipino military to fight radical Islamic groups linked to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network. Thousands of miles away, on the waters of the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean, 10 U.S. Navy ships and vessels from allied nations are blocking potential escape routes for bin Laden and his top aides. The National Security Agency has intensified electronic surveillance of those routes, a senior U.S. official said, reflecting fears that the terrorist mastermind could flee to Africa or East Asia.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Screaming would have been futile. With the wind and the waves and the rumble of the ship, Marine Lance Cpl. Zachary R. Mayo's puny cries would never have been heard, superiors would say later. About all Mayo could do after tumbling into the ocean from the deck of his aircraft carrier was watch in horror as the 81,000-ton vessel receded into the darkness, leaving him alone in the vastness of the Arabian Sea. He might also have prayed, for the odds of his survival were nil. But last weekend, Mayo, 20, the only child of an Osburn, Idaho, silver miner, kept his cool, inflated his uniform into a life preserver, and floated for two days and two nights until he was picked up by a Pakistani fishing boat.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia is filled with old, venerable institutions. And sometimes they just fold and disappear without a proper obituary. Today we consider three once well-known schools with fine reputations that faded from the scene with little or no fanfare. SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE: This renowned trade and technical school was born in 1851 and died 141 years later in 1992. In 1851 Spring Garden was an independent district, outside the city's limits. It created the institute to "improve the moral and intellectual conditions of the youth of the district.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's hard to think of Philadelphia as the "The Quaker City" since there are only a few thousand Quakers still living here. The nickname "City of Homes" is hard to take seriously with so many blighted neighborhoods. But no one can quibble with the title "City of Firsts. " We've produced hundreds - maybe thousands - of "firsts. " Here are a few important and a few off-beat Philadelphia firsts: OPEN-HEART SURGERY Jefferson University and Dr. John H. Gibbons made worldwide news May 6, 1953, when the surgeon used the heart-lung machine he developed to perform the world's first open-heart surgery.
NEWS
October 17, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Three U.S. warships are in position to destroy Iran's northern Silkworm missile base with cruise missiles if the Reagan administration decides to retaliate for the Iranian missile attack on a U.S.-flagged tanker in Kuwaiti waters, defense officials said yesterday. Pentagon strategists rattled off a list of potential targets for U.S. retaliation. They also indicated that any attack probably would be carried out with missiles launched from Navy ships rather than aircraft, to avoid U.S. casualties.
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