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Aramark

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BUSINESS
August 12, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aramark said Wednesday that it paid $140 million this month for HPSI, an Irvine, Calif., group-purchasing firm for the health care, hospitality and higher education sectors. Eric J. Foss, Aramark's chairman and chief executive, said that HPSI - which was founded in 1964, according to HPSI's web site - has thousand of clients for whom it buys $1.4 billion worth of goods, but Aramark declined to share HPSI's revenue or profits on a conference call with analysts. "Our objective is to take this, combine it with our own purchasing power," Foss said.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School District in 2005 hired Aramark to help it erase a long-standing deficit in its full-service cafeterias. But the Philadelphia-based company hasn't closed that deficit, and school officials, none too happy, are now prepared to end the contract with the company if new terms can't be reached. Tom Brady, the district's interim chief executive, said yesterday that he might recommend that the district jettison Aramark when the contract expires at the end of September.
NEWS
March 31, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph J. Rotondo, 28, a computer programmer, died of multiple brain tumors Friday at his Langhorne home. His father, Joseph L., said that since 2007, Mr. Rotondo had worked in the campus-services department at Aramark, the Philadelphia food-services firm. "He worked on the Web sites that a student uses to transact food services," his father said. From 2001 to 2007, Mr. Rotondo worked with computers for the Defense Supply Center in Northeast Philadelphia. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Rotondo graduated from Conwell-Egan High School in 1999, and earned his bachelor's degree in management information systems in 2003 and his master's in computer science in 2008, both from La Salle University.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he came to America, alone, on a ship, as a boy of 14, Joseph Neubauer knew only the English he'd learned from watching John Wayne movies. He could say "Yep" and "Pardner" and "Yes, ma'am. " His American aunt and uncle gave him a job in their garden shop, where this son of Israel earned his keep selling lawn ornaments of the Virgin Mary. From that beginning, Neubauer rose to shape and run Aramark, the $15 billion, worldwide hospitality company based in Philadelphia. And on Tuesday evening, in a quiet announcement made after the stock market closed, he called it a career, saying he would step down after 30 years as chairman with plans to devote more time to the philanthropy that has improved cities, colleges, and lives from Philadelphia to Chicago.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Aramark, the food-service provider formerly known as ARA Services Inc., said yesterday that it had acquired Harry M. Stevens Inc., which operates food and drink concessions at some of the nation's biggest arenas and ballparks. With the newly acquired contracts, Aramark, which has operated stadium concessions around the country since 1966, will now provide service at the homes of 28 teams in baseball, football, basketball and hockey. Aramark officials would not disclose the price of the deal, which gives the Center City-based company rights to venues in nine states and Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Everyone wore red on Thursday: the Phillies fans and the Unite Here pickets, in their union's trademark red T-shirts, who were marching by the hundreds outside Citizens Bank Park. Just like the Phillies, defeated after the San Francisco Giants scored a tie-breaking 10th-inning run, the ballpark's African American workers are losing, as well, said the union that represents them. That's because they tend to work disproportionately in the lowest-paying jobs, the union said. "It's a huge racial disparity," said Dermot Delude-Dix, a researcher with Unite Here Local 274, the hospitality workers union now in contract talks with Aramark, the Philadelphia-based global catering company that employs them at the ballpark.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Aramark Corp., Philadelphia, lost a contract it had since 1992 to run the concession stands at Camden Yards, the home of the Baltimore Orioles. Aramark spokesman David Freireich would not disclose the reason the Orioles gave for deciding against renewing the company's contract for the 2011 baseball season. Aramark had 600 employees working at the ballpark. Many are expected to be picked up by whatever food-service company the Orioles select to succeed Aramark. A spokesman for the Orioles would not disclose the reason for the move.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aramark's 15-year contract to provide lodging, food and beverage, retail, recreational and transportation services at Yosemite National Park, which was the nation's fourth most-visited park last year, started Tuesday. When the National Park Service awarded the contract to Aramark last summer, the agency said Yosemite was the largest concession contract in the National Park system. Aramark officials said last month that they expected the Yosemite contract to bring in $120 million to $130 million a year.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp. won a five-year contract from the Philadelphia Eagles to handle concessions at Lincoln Financial Field, the Philadelphia food-services company said yesterday. The agreement puts Aramark in charge of serving hot dogs, pretzels and beer at all three of the city's major sports facilities. Aramark already has contracts at Citizens Bank Park and the Wachovia complex. The deal at the Linc, signed a few weeks ago, is worth an estimated $10 million a year in revenue - not a huge contract for a company with $10.2 billion in sales last year - but a symbolically important one. "We're real excited, with Philadelphia being our hometown from a corporate standpoint," said Norm Miller, group president of Aramark's sports and entertainment services division, which has contracts at 34 professional sports arenas, ballparks and stadiums.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day after agreeing to a $6.3 billion buyout offer from private investors, Aramark Corp. reported a steep decline in quarterly net income because of noncash charges in its uniform-rental business. The previously announced pretax charges of $42.9 million reduced the Philadelphia company's net income 51 percent, to $35 million, or 19 cents a share, on revenue of $2.9 billion. For the same period a year ago, Aramark reported sales of $2.8 billion and earnings of $71.4 million, or 38 cents a share.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Plenty of Olympic veterans from the Philadelphia area are in Rio for the 2016 games - basketball coaches Dawn Staley and Geno Auriemma and soccer star Carli Lloyd, to name a few. But one longtime local Olympics player is missing in action this year. After catering 16 Olympic Games since 1968, Aramark is sitting on the sidelines, not because it had to, but because it didn't bid for the huge and important job of feeding the athletes in the Olympic Village. "It was a business decision," company spokeswoman Karen Cutler said, declining to explain further.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aramark said Wednesday that it paid $140 million this month for HPSI, an Irvine, Calif., group-purchasing firm for the health care, hospitality and higher education sectors. Eric J. Foss, Aramark's chairman and chief executive, said that HPSI - which was founded in 1964, according to HPSI's web site - has thousand of clients for whom it buys $1.4 billion worth of goods, but Aramark declined to share HPSI's revenue or profits on a conference call with analysts. "Our objective is to take this, combine it with our own purchasing power," Foss said.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Everyone wore red on Thursday: the Phillies fans and the Unite Here pickets, in their union's trademark red T-shirts, who were marching by the hundreds outside Citizens Bank Park. Just like the Phillies, defeated after the San Francisco Giants scored a tie-breaking 10th-inning run, the ballpark's African American workers are losing, as well, said the union that represents them. That's because they tend to work disproportionately in the lowest-paying jobs, the union said. "It's a huge racial disparity," said Dermot Delude-Dix, a researcher with Unite Here Local 274, the hospitality workers union now in contract talks with Aramark, the Philadelphia-based global catering company that employs them at the ballpark.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Samantha Quinones bought kale for the first time this week - and ate it raw in a salad mixed with some spinach. Chalk it up to a class on food and nutrition that the 25-year-old single mother of two boys is taking at Congreso de Latinos Unidos in North Philadelphia. Quinones, who lives in the Mayfair section of Northeast Philadelphia, said the class, sponsored by the food-service giant Aramark and the American Heart Association, is making a big difference to her. "I'm more aware of what I buy at the grocery store," Quinones said.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Joseph Neubauer will receive WHYY's Lifelong Learning Award at the organization's 15th annual President's Dinner on May 3, WHYY said Tuesday. Neubauer retired in February 2015 as chairman of Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia food-service company he led for 30 years. Neubauer, whose Neubauer Family Foundation is a major supporter of causes in the Philadelphia region, remains Aramark's third-largest shareholder, with 5.34 percent of the shares outstanding. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker  
BUSINESS
April 9, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Aramark has decided to keep its global headquarters in Philadelphia, ending speculation that the food- and facilities-services giant may decamp to another city with its jobs and prestige. The company is not yet sure whether it will remain at its namesake headquarters tower at 1101 Market St. or move to another building, but it has concluded that Philadelphia's business costs, talent supply, transportation links, and other advantages will keep it in town, communications chief Tod MacKenzie said in an interview ahead of Thursday's announcement.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aramark's 15-year contract to provide lodging, food and beverage, retail, recreational and transportation services at Yosemite National Park, which was the nation's fourth most-visited park last year, started Tuesday. When the National Park Service awarded the contract to Aramark last summer, the agency said Yosemite was the largest concession contract in the National Park system. Aramark officials said last month that they expected the Yosemite contract to bring in $120 million to $130 million a year.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aramark shares closed Wednesday at their highest level since the firm went public two years ago. Shares of the Philadelphia food-service provider gained 2.95 percent, or 98 cents, to close at $33.86, one day after Aramark impressed analysts with increased projections of higher profit margins over the next three years. At its first-ever investor day, Aramark officials explained how they would reduce $3 billion in annual food costs and $6 billion in labor costs to boost the company's profit margin to 7.2 percent from 6.2 percent.
FOOD
September 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most meals on Temple University's main campus are served by a huge, multinational food-services company, Sodexo. But in a sunny room tucked away in one academic building, students at the Rad Dish Cafe are cooking up something different: salads made with produce from the Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative and local-food distributor Common Market, sandwiches on bread baked at Philadelphia's Wild Flour Bakery, coffee from local fair-trade roaster Greenstreet,...
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I got a chance to catch up with Joe Beddia, the busy man at Pizza Beddia, which Bon Appétit named the best pizza in America. Much has changed for the tiny pizza shop in Fishtown. But much has not. The waits are even more insane. And it's not like Beddia is known as a speedy pie-tosser. Better get used to it, for now. Such an honor for an iconoclast like Beddia, even well-deserved, sounds like the definition of a mixed blessing: "It's always good to see good work appreciated, but it's been a little overwhelming.
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