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Aramark

BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's bigger than ballpark hot dogs, bigger than college cafeterias, bigger even than feeding 10,000 Olympic athletes: ARA Services wants to be the world's full-line service company. With a name change to Aramark, a new logo and an international advertising campaign - all to hit in October - the Philadelphia firm will sell itself around the world as a one-stop source for uniform rental, housekeeping services, child care, magazine and newspaper distribution, even emergency-room staffing for hospitals.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2004 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying it did not see a broad slowdown in the economy, Aramark Corp. reported yesterday that third-quarter revenue rose 11 percent but profit was squeezed by unexpected costs. The Center City food and facilities-management company said it had unanticipated costs in several large contracts to provide services to health-care institutions. Aramark's operating margin - operating income divided by revenue - fell to 5.1 percent in the quarter from 5.5 percent in the same quarter last year.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2004 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An improving economy and stronger core operations led to higher sales and earnings at Aramark Corp., one of the region's larger employers, in the second quarter. Sales rose 12 percent to $2.5 billion as the company, based in Center City, saw higher revenue in its food-service operations in the United States, its largest division; food operations overseas; and uniform rental. In its food-service operations, Aramark employees cook and serve meals at sports stadiums, schools, hospitals, prisons and other venues.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., the largest U.S.-based food-service company, will be taken private after shareholders overwhelmingly approved a $6.3 billion buyout bid yesterday. It marked the second time that a group of investors led by chairman and chief executive officer Joseph Neubauer moved to take Aramark off the stock market. The first time, in 1984, was to thwart a "hostile takeover attempt that could have been the end of the company," Neubauer said at a meeting of shareholders at the Center City Marriott Hotel yesterday.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia-based purveyor of work clothes, day care and stadium food, rejoined the New York Stock Exchange yesterday after a 17-year absence. Aramark's high-rise Market Street headquarters, topped by its "star-man" logo, is a familiar fixture on the Center City skyline. But its corporate staff totals only 115, and most of the company's 200,000 employees labor elsewhere - in more than 600 Children's World day-care centers, 350 college cafeterias, 165 public-arena food concessions, 200 laundry plants and depots, and clothing factories in low-wage Puerto Rico and Mexico, among other sites.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Leonard, 55, was named chief executive yesterday of Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia-based global food and facilities-management firm where he has worked for 21 years. When he takes over in January, he will become only the fourth CEO in the company's 44 years, succeeding Joseph Neubauer, 62, who has held the office since 1984. There will not be a lot of changes, Leonard said. "Joe and I think alike at work. . . . After work, we're as different as night and day. . . . He's symphony and opera.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1998 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the world of business, Sandi Berger is a flea among elephants. Berger runs the lobby shop in the Parkway office building that houses Reliance Insurance Co., whose parent had 1997 revenues of $3.4 billion. Now comes Aramark Corp., the $6.3 billion service giant known for its food operations at big-league stadiums and arenas. Aramark already runs Reliance's company cafeteria, and apparently it wants Berger's shop, too. Like anyone afoot in a land of giants, Berger fears getting lost - or squished - in the shuffle.
FOOD
May 15, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Few athletes would dare dine on Thai chicken satay, Russian borscht, Peking duck, Moroccan couscous, Greek moussaka, Spanish paella, Italian tiramisu and Georgia peach cobbler before a competition. But all's fair at the food table after events. And at an Olympic World Menu preview party hosted here May 6 by Aramark, the food service manager for the Olympic Games in Atlanta this summer. The tasting revealed a new look for the buffet in the Olympic Village Dining Room, from food station graphics to more personalized, finished-to-order dishes.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Claude Feninger, 87, of Malvern, who built grand luxury hotels around the world for Hilton, Sheraton and Omni, died Sunday, April 28, of kidney disease at his home. Before his retirement in the early 1990s, Mr. Feninger was president of international operations for Aramark. His responsibilities included servicing the Olympic Games for many years. Throughout his career, Mr. Feninger brought European hotel luxury and services to the United States. On the world stage, he developed, constructed, arranged financing for, and created hotel operations at 85 properties on six continents.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based food service giant Aramark said today it will eliminate all pork from animals bred using gestation crates in its U.S. supply chain by 2017. In announcing the plans with the Humane Society of the United States, Aramark joins dozens of other food service companies, restaurant chains and supermarkets that have pledged to end their reliance on suppliers who house breeding pigs in confining crates their whole lives. "Aramark is proud to stand in partnership with other industry leaders and supply chain partners to transition away from gestation crates in a timely fashion," said Kathy Cacciola, Aramark's senior director of environmental sustainability.
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