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Aramark

BUSINESS
December 12, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia-based purveyor of work clothes, day care and stadium food, rejoined the New York Stock Exchange yesterday after a 17-year absence. Aramark's high-rise Market Street headquarters, topped by its "star-man" logo, is a familiar fixture on the Center City skyline. But its corporate staff totals only 115, and most of the company's 200,000 employees labor elsewhere - in more than 600 Children's World day-care centers, 350 college cafeterias, 165 public-arena food concessions, 200 laundry plants and depots, and clothing factories in low-wage Puerto Rico and Mexico, among other sites.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Leonard, 55, was named chief executive yesterday of Aramark Corp., the Philadelphia-based global food and facilities-management firm where he has worked for 21 years. When he takes over in January, he will become only the fourth CEO in the company's 44 years, succeeding Joseph Neubauer, 62, who has held the office since 1984. There will not be a lot of changes, Leonard said. "Joe and I think alike at work. . . . After work, we're as different as night and day. . . . He's symphony and opera.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1998 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the world of business, Sandi Berger is a flea among elephants. Berger runs the lobby shop in the Parkway office building that houses Reliance Insurance Co., whose parent had 1997 revenues of $3.4 billion. Now comes Aramark Corp., the $6.3 billion service giant known for its food operations at big-league stadiums and arenas. Aramark already runs Reliance's company cafeteria, and apparently it wants Berger's shop, too. Like anyone afoot in a land of giants, Berger fears getting lost - or squished - in the shuffle.
FOOD
May 15, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Few athletes would dare dine on Thai chicken satay, Russian borscht, Peking duck, Moroccan couscous, Greek moussaka, Spanish paella, Italian tiramisu and Georgia peach cobbler before a competition. But all's fair at the food table after events. And at an Olympic World Menu preview party hosted here May 6 by Aramark, the food service manager for the Olympic Games in Atlanta this summer. The tasting revealed a new look for the buffet in the Olympic Village Dining Room, from food station graphics to more personalized, finished-to-order dishes.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based food service giant Aramark said today it will eliminate all pork from animals bred using gestation crates in its U.S. supply chain by 2017. In announcing the plans with the Humane Society of the United States, Aramark joins dozens of other food service companies, restaurant chains and supermarkets that have pledged to end their reliance on suppliers who house breeding pigs in confining crates their whole lives. "Aramark is proud to stand in partnership with other industry leaders and supply chain partners to transition away from gestation crates in a timely fashion," said Kathy Cacciola, Aramark's senior director of environmental sustainability.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeing sales opportunities among ecstatic Flyers fans, Aramark will open four "team store outposts" to sell jerseys, Flyers souvenirs, and Stanley Cup merchandise. The Flyers beat the Montreal Canadiens in Game 5 of the National Hockey League Eastern Conference finals on Monday, ushering them into the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time since 1997. The Flyers will play the Blackhawks for the Cup, beginning Saturday in Chicago. "This town is really excited," Ike Richman, spokesman for Comcast-Spectacor, said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2003 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the courtside Lexus Club to Victors fine-dining restaurant on the First Union Center's second level, it's evident that a revolution has taken place in arena concessions: Jumbo shrimp, crab cakes, freshly made roast beef sandwiches, gourmet french fries, specialty pretzels, cups of micro-brewed beer, and nachos. Mobile carts were strategically placed throughout the arena, and bartenders in club boxes were pouring beers and mixing alcoholic drinks. "When you walk into this facility, you want to eat," said Gail Clark, the Aramark Corp.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arizona lettuce. New Zealand apples. Chilean peaches. Cheap and plentiful food from afar is a wonder of modern life. But it doesn't taste right to some consumers, who have begun demanding food from closer to home. University of Pennsylvania students Emma Kirwan and Rachel Meyer, for example, began working last fall with Aramark Corp. - one of the world's largest food-service providers - to get local foods on Penn's menu. "The world is just so disconnected from their food these days," said Kirwan, who grew up gardening with her mother in Connecticut.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1997 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Aramark employee who becomes unable to work because of a physical disability is eligible to receive benefits until the age of 65 under the company's long-term disability plan. But an employee who becomes unable to work because of mental illness receives benefits for only two years. The federal government thinks that's unfair. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is suing Aramark, claiming its plan discriminates against people with mental disabilities. The suit also names Aetna Life Insurance Co., which administers the Philadelphia company's plan.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oh, Dijon mustard. No wonder it will cost $25 for a dozen "Philly-style soft pretzels" at the First Union Center during the Republican National Convention. That's the price Aramark - the preferred caterer at the First Union Center during the convention - will charge organizations that want to serve pretzels at any catered party or luncheon when the GOP convenes. Also on the menu? Thirty dollars for a gallon of coffee - that's $1.87 an eight-ounce cup. Or $25 for a fruit basket with a dozen pieces of fruit, just a little more than $2 a banana.
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