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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest quarterly Arbitron ratings book, you have to look beyond the usual numbers to get any idea of what's happening on the local radio scene. That's because, for the most part, the major indications of the listening patterns of people 12 and older each quarter have become more or less predictable. For example, KYW-AM (1060), the all-news station that has reigned supreme in the Arbitron wars, did so again in the latest figures, for winter 1998-99, winning overall honors with a 7.8 percent share of the audience.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Power 99 is the area's most popular music station, says the Arbitron rating service. So you'd expect Bruce Holberg, general manager of Power 99 (WUSL-FM, 98.9), to be pretty happy with Arbitron. Wrong. Arbitron, which rates radio stations by measuring their audiences, does not adequately reflect the size of his or other black-oriented stations' audiences, Holberg says. Cody Anderson agrees. He's the owner, general manager and afternoon talk- show host of WHAT-AM (1340)
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | BY DAVE BARRY
There comes a time in the life of every American citizen when Duty calls. "Hey! YOU!!" are Duty's exact words, and unless you're some kind of flag- desecrating pervert, you're going to stand up, as Americans have stood up for more than 200 years, and you're going to say, "Yes, I will participate in the Arbitron television-ratings survey. " I answered The Call one recent afternoon. The phone rang, and it was a person informing me I had been selected to be an Arbitron household based on an exhaustive screening process consisting of being home when my number was dialed at random.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Ken Garland's routine hasn't changed much in his 38 years as a disc jockey. Each weekday, he awakens at 3:15 a.m., reads a magazine, has breakfast, showers and walks out the door by 4:45. A half-hour later - with 45 minutes to air time - he's at the Bala Cynwyd studios of WPEN-AM (950), sifting through newspapers and inserting his own records into the morning playlist. Then it's into the broadcast booth until 10 a.m. With his tenure in the industry, you might think that Garland would ask for a time slot that would allow him to sleep late once in a while.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eagle 106 . . . The Soundtrack of Philadelphia. If you haven't heard that on-air slogan blaring from a radio recently, then you haven't pulled up next to a teenager with the windows rolled down at a stoplight. Or been paying close attention to the Philadelphia radio scene. The fact is, Eagle 106 - WEGX-FM (106.1) to the FCC - is just about the hottest radio station in town these days. Not No. 1, but the hottest. (There is a difference.) No. 1 is still rock giant WMMR-FM (93.3)
NEWS
May 9, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first batch of radio ratings obtained through Arbitron's new electronic system presents a very different picture of Philadelphians' listening habits. Many stations are boasting larger audiences - but the audiences are more restive, flipping the dial more than Arbitron previously estimated. In a national movement starting with Philadelphia, Arbitron recently began using pager-size Portable People Meters to measure listening, ending a four-decade practice of paper diaries.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Conceding its ratings battle with KYW-TV's The Newlywed Game, WCAU-TV is dropping its 5-to-5:30 p.m. news show, it was announced yesterday. "The audience isn't there," said WCAU vice president and general manager Steve Cohen. On Sept. 15, the 30-minute news program, anchored by Larry Kane and Alan Frio, will be replaced by the second half of the series Quincy, which will begin at 4:30. Quincy now airs from 4 to 5; Divorce Court will move into the 4-to-4:30 slot. The news from 5:30 to 6, anchored by Kane and Frio, will become Frio's alone.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
The local news numbers arrived yesterday for February's "sweeps," and the big story you won't see on Channel 6's Action News is the horse race that may be shaping up at 11 p.m. According to Nielsen and Arbitron ratings, WPVI-TV (Channel 6) news is still untouchable at noon, 5, 5:30 and 6 p.m. But the gap at 11 p.m., the big- money show, is much narrower: Arbitron finds Channel 3 and Channel 10 within four points of Channel 6, though Nielsen shows a seven-point difference. If the 11 p.m. race does heat up, it couldn't come at a better time for Channel 10, which added Channel 3 expatriate Diane Allen to its 11 p.m. anchor lineup Feb. 16. It's much too soon to see what effect her highly hyped presence at 11, as well as 5:30, will have on the numbers.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's one for Channel 10 consumer ace Herb Denenberg: Is Channel 10 getting its 25 million dollars' worth from Bill Cosby? According to the just-released local Arbitron and Nielsen TV ratings for the important November "sweeps," the answer is yes and no. The Cosby Show - the most expensive syndicated show in history - more than doubled WCAU-TV's numbers at 5 p.m., as compared with November 1987. But the station did not hold those numbers at 5:30 and 6. In addition, the Cosby reruns didn't damage the competition nearly as much as the other stations had feared.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
We'll be hearing lots about "the peace dividend" for consumer electronics during the new Clinton/Gore regime, as major high-tech companies redirect their sophisticated knowledge into non-defense applications. Hughes Communications, a division of the aerospace giant, is already offering its mind-tricking SRS pseudo-surround-sound system as stand-alone encoders and in TV sets sold by Sony and RCA. The circuitry was developed for use in flight simulators. Now Hughes is gearing up to make two other non-threatening products for fun and games.
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NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Dan Gross
UPSTART talk-radio station IQ 106.9-FM had its best ratings book since its April launch during the Oct. 11 to Nov. 7 period, according to the latest Arbitron figures. The station was the 10th most-listened-to station in the market by men and women 12 and older. Credit Rush Limbaugh , who can be heard from noon to 3 p.m. and the presidential election with much of the success, but it's still notable that a seven-month-old station was up from 18th place in the same category from the last ratings period from September to October.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
That loud "ho-ho-ho" you may be hearing in Bala Cynwyd can be traced to the offices of WBEB-FM (B101). Arbitron just released the ratings for the holiday period (Dec. 9 to Jan. 5), and the light-rock outlet again cleaned up with its all-Christmas format. Among listeners ages 12 and up, the Bee pulled a 15.3 share, meaning that about one in six radio listeners was tuned in. No. 2 in the ratings was all-news KYW-AM (1060), with less than half that share, 7.1. Having heart For the next 11 months, Cigna's foundation office in Two Liberty Place will be brightened by Alex's Heart Painting - created in 2004 by Alexandra "Alex" Scott before her death.
NEWS
May 9, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first batch of radio ratings obtained through Arbitron's new electronic system presents a very different picture of Philadelphians' listening habits. Many stations are boasting larger audiences - but the audiences are more restive, flipping the dial more than Arbitron previously estimated. In a national movement starting with Philadelphia, Arbitron recently began using pager-size Portable People Meters to measure listening, ending a four-decade practice of paper diaries.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arbitron Inc. began using electronic monitors last week to measure radio ratings and started what will become a national system in Philadelphia, where it was tested several years ago. Arbitron and its partners believe that the "portable people meter" is far more accurate than the pencil-and-paper diaries used since 1965. They also said PPM would show that radio's overall audience has been underrated, which ultimately could boost the medium's share of ad revenue. On Thursday, 2,040 randomly selected surveyors in the region switched on cell-phone-size devices known as PPMs.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Upstart radio station WRDW-FM (96.5) is now a serious contender, according to the latest Arbitron radio ratings. Wired, a contemporary-hit station that began in November as Wild, passed top-40 WIOQ-FM (102.1, Q102) to finish third, just behind resurgent rock station WYSP-FM (94.1), among listeners in its target demographic, ages 18 to 34, in the spring "book," issued Tuesday. Q102 finished fourth. Urban-contemporary WUSL-FM (98.9, Power 99) remained No. 1 among those younger listeners.
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
See, young men do listen. At least to the talk shows on WYSP-FM (94.1). In the spring Arbitron ratings, released yesterday and covering March 29 to June 20, WYSP's stock among young men soared. WYSP's share among men ages 18 to 24 nearly doubled in one ratings period. Its 24.1 share of 18-to-24-year-olds means that in the spring, about one in four young men listening to radio in Philadelphia were tuned to WYSP during a typical 15-minute period. This was WYSP's first full "book" since it created a 13-hour daytime block of syndicated talk shows by bringing in hosts Don & Mike for the midday.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Exactly when the crown was passed down is something of a mystery. Gov. McGreevey had been in office for only a few weeks. And acerbic talk-show host Jim Gearhart of New Jersey's WKXW-FM (101.5) already was announcing that King James II had arrived. King James I - as the station's loyal listeners know - was the unflattering title Gearhart bestowed upon Jim Florio, who was ousted after one term as governor. In Gearhart's view, McGreevey was proving a worthy heir: "In Greek, it's called hubris," the station's morning personality said.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A clandestine cadre of 300 people have been walking around Wilmington, toting devices developed with Defense Department technology that are capable of picking up secret signals zipping through the air. Their mission is not to serve the national interest. It's to help radio stations in this area figure out who's listening to Howard Stern, Smashmouth and the Car Guys. The gadget each carries is the personal people meter, now being used for the first time in Delaware, and scheduled to be tested later this year in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the latest quarterly Arbitron ratings book, you have to look beyond the usual numbers to get any idea of what's happening on the local radio scene. That's because, for the most part, the major indications of the listening patterns of people 12 and older each quarter have become more or less predictable. For example, KYW-AM (1060), the all-news station that has reigned supreme in the Arbitron wars, did so again in the latest figures, for winter 1998-99, winning overall honors with a 7.8 percent share of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a long wait for those of us who follow the stories told every three months by the quarterly Arbitron ratings - two days, to be exact. But when the numbers came out Friday morning, it was kind of anticlimactic. No huge surprises. Unless you work at WDAS-FM (105.3), WJJZ-FM (106.1), or WUSL-FM (98.9). These three stations, all boasting large concentrations of urban, predominantly African American listeners, showed the most movement in the Arbitron winter book. The book measured the listening habits of selected area radio listeners between Jan. 8 and April 1. WDAS-FM had the most impressive gain in winter '98, surging from fifth place a year ago (5.4)
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