CollectionsArboretum
IN THE NEWS

Arboretum

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: A nonprofit public park, arboretum and wildlife sanctuary in Devon. The celebration: There is a full schedule of events throughout the summer celebrating the arboretum's 30th anniversary. Coming event: Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. is the arboretum's Lilliputian birthday event for children and families: Giant watering cans artfully placed throughout the arboretum's 20 acres of winding hills and natural woodlands make children feel tiny by comparison, just like the people of Lilliput.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Since they began in 1975, the outdoor sculpture exhibitions organized by Marsha Moss have become major summer art events in Philadelphia. This year, though, the show nearly turned into a non-event when the financially beleaguered Goode administration reneged on a $20,000 pledge of support. Moss managed to cover the loss from other sources so that the show could open on schedule today. She has applied for a Class 500 grant of $10,000, but the grants are not expected to be awarded until later this month.
NEWS
March 26, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mention the Barnes Foundation and paintings come to mind. Lots and lots of fabulous artwork on the walls of eccentric old Albert Barnes' former home in Merion. But there's another, lesser-known universe there, one that will remain after the artwork moves to a new home on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at the end of 2011. It comprises a 12-acre arboretum and a small education program that is widely appreciated in horticultural circles and virtually unknown to the wider public. Now, something surprising - you might say downright un-Barnes-like - is happening.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jared Grove and Brian Sullivan decided to go out on a limb. Without knowing much about it, they decided to commit a lot of their time to a subject that they once couldn't have cared less about. For the last several weeks, the two have been researching and cataloging more than 200 trees on the campus of Friends' Central as part of their senior project. It will help the school plan its arboretum. Most area schools have a senior project or career elective in May and June in which students spend two to four weeks doing community service or working on a job they may be interested in pursuing after graduation.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Chuck Blatherwick announced his plans last spring to build an arboretum at Edgewood Senior High School, most of his environmental-science students did not know what the word meant. "Half of us couldn't even pronounce it," said Jill Rodio, 18, an Edgewood senior and president of the environmental club. "We were, like, 'What's that?' " Now Rodio and her classmates know the difference between a pitcher plant and a cattail - and more. What students in Edgewood Senior's environmental club are doing, they explained as they sank shovels into the muddy ground on Tuesday, is recreating a miniature Pinelands ecosystem with plants native only to the South Jersey area.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By Sandy Bressler and Leslie Simon
In the legal battle over the future of the Barnes Foundation and its renowned art collection, this critical issue has been overlooked: the fate of the arboretum and its horticulture program. Dr. Albert Barnes originally considered creating his art gallery in Center City, but he changed his plans when land owned by Capt. Joseph Lapsley Wilson - the beginnings of an arboretum - became available in Merion. Barnes bought the property in 1922, preserved the trees that Wilson had begun planting in the 1880s, and eventually expanded the collection to more than 3,000 species and varieties of woody plants.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Biblical passages mark the trail of the arboretum at the Church of the Saviour in Wayne. The messages are there to inspire hikers as they meander through two miles of winding paths in 29 acres behind the church's sanctuary. "We're not trying to save souls, but we are trying to get people into the church," said Don Young, director of the nature center. Young selects the verses and hand-paints them on small pieces of wood, which are tacked onto stakes in the ground. There will be 26 such messages on this spiritual journey, beginning with A ("And out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air. " Genesis 2:19)
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Villanova University has a secret. It's near the chapel where students flock on Sundays, near the library, and near the soccer field. In fact, Villanova's campus-wide arboretum - virtually unknown to the public and even students - is spread all over the 240-acre campus. It boasts one of the largest dawn redwoods on the East Coast, a Halka Zelkova that was already 20 feet tall when planted, a cutleaf Japanese maple, and many beech trees, the most widely recognized tree on campus.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The idea of inviting artists to create in - and in direct response to - a varied and attractive outdoor site such as the arboretum in West Fairmount Park is intrinsically appealing. The arboretum, home to a number of permanent sculptural monuments, has proved hospitable to all kinds of sculpture - organic work that harmonizes with its garden and woodland settings as well as more formalist work that contrasts with them. When she moved her summer sculpture exhibition to the arboretum in 1986, independent curator Marsha Moss invited artists to create site-specific works that would relate directly to the park or would address environmental issues.
LIVING
February 6, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here in "the quiet arboretum" at Haverford College, you probably won't learn how to make a birdhouse or design a holiday centerpiece. Nothing wrong with classes and workshops, of course, but this place has a different, more introspective feel than other arboretums. Students and visitors are welcome to explore the 216-acre campus and otherwise enjoy the beauty of the arboretum's 2,500 trees, some as old as the college itself. "But we're quiet about it. We're more for passive enjoyment.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do not get Allen Lacy going on the subject of Bradford pear trees or forsythia bushes unless you want to get an earful. He considers them common and overplanted, and you won't find a single one in the Linwood Arboretum in Linwood, N.J., which Lacy created five years ago and somehow manages to keep going with his septuagenarian wife, Hella, a half-dozen volunteers, a surfeit of optimism, and hardly any money. Lacy calls it "the smallest arboretum in the world," but its wish list may be the largest.
FOOD
July 18, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yes, the kids are learning how to slice and dice, why a nicely set table is important, and the difference homegrown produce can make to health and well-being. But Teen Leadership Corps, an unusual summer program at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown, is about much more: Good work habits, interpersonal and leadership skills, possible job opportunities, and "green" enterprises, such as a farmer's market or herbal-products business. "It's about meaningful work and growing leaders," says Anna Herman, one of its founders.
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visiting the other Barnes icon - the arboretum, not the art museum - just got a whole lot easier. For the first time, the 12-acre landscape on North Latchs Lane in Merion is open to the public on weekends with none of the old constraints on visitation. No more reservations. You can just show up, pay $5 admission, as opposed to $15 when the art was there, and park free instead of shelling out another $15. More tours, more programming. You can even bring a picnic lunch. "Instead of being the place you keep people out of - which, in some ways, is part of our history - we want to be a place that welcomes you," said Margaret B. Zminda, acting director of the Barnes Foundation, which oversees the horticulture and the art that moved in 2012 to a new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nine years as director of the Temple University Ambler Arboretum, Jenny Rose Carey announced her resignation Wednesday, effective June 30. In an interview, Carey, a garden historian, says she hoped to do research, writing, and lecturing around the country and overseas. She has two books in mind, both in search of publishers - one about early-20th-century gardens in the Philadelphia area and the extraordinary women who designed and cultivated them, and another about her own garden in Ambler.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Brudzinski got her first job with a tree-care company when she was 18. She liked the secretarial work, but deep down, she thought the guys were having all the real fun as they went out day after day to climb and trim the trees. So she worked her way up - literally. "I was always jealous watching the guys going out and doing tree work," Brudzinski said. "One spring, I said, 'I want to do it. Teach me how.' There was a little bit of resistance, because they said, 'No. This is a boy's job.' " Brudzinski eventually got her training and joined the men in the trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The shadows of our walking selves are huge and distorted, like giants moonwalking in a fun house. Who knew Jenkins Arboretum could be so entertaining on a mild afternoon in autumn? Its 46 acres are gently tucked into a residential neighborhood in Devon, not far from the Route 202 raceway, where everyone, it seems, considers speed limits optional. You can hear the traffic deep inside the garden, but the sound is nicely muffled, like the muted landscape of this quiet season and place.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The monarch butterflies at the Tyler Arboretum were about a week old, so it was time for them to move on. About 60 orange-and-black monarchs, freshly emerged from their chrysalises, were tagged and released into the wild at the arboretum's Butterfly Festival on Saturday. Over the next several weeks, the delicate insects will flutter about 2,500 miles south and then west before settling in a central Mexican mountain range with millions of others, the longest migratory journey of any North American butterfly.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
On 55 acres of historic landscape in the heart of urban Germantown, the yellow aconite is blooming, the snowdrops and purple crocuses are up, and you can sense the fragile promise of spring. That's a way of thinking about Awbury Arboretum, too, as it looks to reinvent itself - yet again. This grand old estate has new leadership and big plans: To stabilize finances, to work with the neighborhood and local schools, to tackle long-standing maintenance and organizational problems, and to reassert ownership of what Christopher R. van de Velde calls "our primary mission - the care and feeding of the landscape.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curious about what some of the public gardens and arboretums in the Philadelphia region are planning for 2012? Here's a preview: Awbury Arboretum in Germantown has a new community apiary - three hives outside and a demonstration hive inside the Francis Cope House. A 10-session beekeeping course is under way and a 4-H beekeeping club is planned, as are honey sales. Beekeeper Anaiis Salles suggested the apiary because "Awbury has underutilized green space, plenty of room for hives, it's easy to get to, and has a really nontoxic environment.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eavesdrop in a garden, and what do you hear? Not a lot of narrative. Mostly exclamations over the beauty of something and curiosity about what it is, in and around the absorbing silence. So it is that Paul W. Meyer has "written" a new book about the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill with no text, just photographs, most taken over the last eight years. Its title is a straightforward Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Through the Lens of Paul W. Meyer. "It's meant to be a walk through the garden," explains Meyer, 59, a self-taught shutterbug who has worked at Morris for almost 36 years, the last 21 as director.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|