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Arboretum

NEWS
October 9, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here let the young and the gay repair. And in this scene of light and beauty, gather from Earth, and Sky and Air, lessons of Life, and Love and Duty! From a 1845 hymn consecrating a new kind of cemetery To wander among the stunning architecture and rich flora of West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd is to virtually experience enlightenment. The paths curve gently past finely chiseled granite stones that seem to have been planted at the same time as cucumber magnolias, Kentucky coffee trees, and weeping hemlocks.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Just as people return time after time to theaters to see their favorite stars, so they return each year to the Philadelphia Flower Show to watch for favorite competitors. Visitors may not know ribbon-winners by their faces, but they recognize familiar names and their talents as prize-winning bulb-forcers, best begonia growers or finest topiary trimmers. One of the most enduring and endearing teams to participate is that of Julie Morris and Lee Morris Raden. They've been hooked on the Flower Show since 1972, when they first submitted a joint entry, and they'll be back at this year's display, which begins next Sunday.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After 39 years of working with plants, Joe Hannas can afford to sit back and smell the roses. Like many people in retirement, Hannas, 61, finds himself putting off those little chores, such as watering the houseplants. There's a bonsai on a windowsill of his apartment. But it looks a little tired and neglected: Its miniature branches are turning brown in places. Considering Hannas' last place of employment - Longwood Gardens - his laissez faire attitude is surprising. For Longwood Gardens is no ordinary patch of greenery where workers toil for a couple of years and then move on. A world-renowned public garden, Longwood has always been "the place to be," as Hannas sees it. "It wasn't unusual for somebody to work there 45, 50 years," he recalled.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Nofer, 71, of Spring Mill, a celebrated graphic artist and watercolorist who designed a Philadelphia logo for the American Bicentennial, died Thursday at Keystone House in Wyndmoor. His representational watercolors are included in prominent private and corporate collections. In 1995, the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College honored him with a one-man retrospective exhibition. For 25 years, Mr. Nofer operated a graphic-design studio in the Old City section of Philadelphia, where he did advertising for pharmaceutical companies and amassed many awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you think of a swan song, "Happy Birthday" doesn't generally come to mind. But next weekend, the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill will sing happy birthday to three adorable baby cygnets. The latest additions to the resident Royal Swan family were born May 17. The two-day celebration will include guided tours of the arboretum - whose roses should be at peak bloom then - refreshments, and, for children, tales and myths about swans and a related craft program. Festivities will run from 1 to 4 p.m. June 15 and 16. The arboretum will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A collection of more than 600 Indian artifacts gathered from the cornfields of Chester County has found a new home at Tyler Arboretum in Middletown. The artifacts donated by Norman H. McDowell of Chester County will be used as part of an educational program offered to schoolchildren at the Tyler Arboretum, according to Brenda Mohr, the children's instructor at the arboretum. Over the years, McDowell gathered the projectile points and tools from the fields in Franklin Township, where he grew up. The artifacts were left by Indians who once lived there, McDowell said.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rogers Davis gingerly opened the front of the wooden box and was eye-to-eye with a 15-day-old bluebird. One tiny black eye peered out at Davis and its other visitors. Snug in the nest with its siblings, the little bird apparently had no desire to fly the coop. At least not yet. The bluebird box at Tyler Arboretum seemed to meet his needs nicely. "They're not interested in leaving the nest," explained one volunteer during the Bluebird Ramble June 6 on the arboretum grounds.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | By Jane G. Pepper, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The sky was clear and there was barely a breath of wind when Paul Meyer and his wife, Debbie, said goodbye to the friends in Delaware they had visited for supper one evening last summer. But as they returned to Philadelphia, and approached the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania where Paul Meyer is director, they became alarmed. The streets were strewn with debris, large trees were piled in their path and the buzz of chainsaws was audible. Over a period of six minutes on Aug. 3, a tornado ripped through the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia, causing millions of dollars worth of damage.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
The Scott Arboretum's biennial plant sale isn't until Sept. 14, but May 15 is the deadline for advance sale orders, so if you're looking for unusual plants - many not readily available in local nurseries - give the arboretum a call at 328-8025 to request a complimentary catalogue. The arboretum, on the campus of Swarthmore College in Delaware County, provides a display of the best ornamental plants recommended for Philadelphia- area gardens. More than 5,000 kinds of plants are there, all selected for their outstanding ornamental qualities, ease of maintenance and resistance to disease.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
After a nationwide search, Springfield Township resident Paul Meyer has been appointed director of the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, which is in Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia and Springfield Township. Meyer, a member of the search committee, twice declined invitations to be a candidate because he enjoyed his former position with the arboretum, he said. Meyer has been curator of the living collection since 1976 and chairman of the horticulture department for the last six years.
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