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Arboretum

NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
With the installation of a large kinetic sculpture and the opening of a temporary exhibition in the Butcher Sculpture Garden, the Morris Arboretum has completed the first phase of a program to develop the 166-acre garden as a major outdoor gallery. George Rickey's Two Lines is a stainless steel mast with two arms that move in the wind like clock hands. When they are vertical, the piece is 60 feet high. Two Lines has been installed on the hilltop where the mansion of John and Lydia Morris, founders of the arboretum, once stood.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eavesdrop in a garden, and what do you hear? Not a lot of narrative. Mostly exclamations over the beauty of something and curiosity about what it is, in and around the absorbing silence. So it is that Paul W. Meyer has "written" a new book about the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill with no text, just photographs, most taken over the last eight years. Its title is a straightforward Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania Through the Lens of Paul W. Meyer. "It's meant to be a walk through the garden," explains Meyer, 59, a self-taught shutterbug who has worked at Morris for almost 36 years, the last 21 as director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do not get Allen Lacy going on the subject of Bradford pear trees or forsythia bushes unless you want to get an earful. He considers them common and overplanted, and you won't find a single one in the Linwood Arboretum in Linwood, N.J., which Lacy created five years ago and somehow manages to keep going with his septuagenarian wife, Hella, a half-dozen volunteers, a surfeit of optimism, and hardly any money. Lacy calls it "the smallest arboretum in the world," but its wish list may be the largest.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Providence Garden Club will have its annual plant sale this Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Tyler Arboretum in Lima. The sale, which will take place in the arboretum's maintenance building at Painter and Forge Roads, will include annuals, hanging baskets, perennials and other items. Club member Elisabeth Hammons said many of the plants were grown by members of the club. "The sale is our main fund-raiser," Hammons said. "The main purpose of the sale is to turn the money over to horticultural-type charities.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
William M. Klein, the ebullient director of the Morris Arboretum who is credited with transforming its rundown grounds into one of the leading arboretums in the country, has announced his resignation. Klein, 57, said he planned to become director of the Fairchild Tropical Garden in Miami in March. He also will join the faculties of the University of Miami and Florida International University. He announced his decision last week to the arboretum board and staff. His resignation was announced officially yesterday by the University of Pennsylvania, overseer of the arboretum in Chestnut Hill.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Some like to spend their winter time on the ski slopes and some beside the fire, but to Elinor Goff, plant recorder at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, February is the time to be out on the arboretum trails looking at winter flowers, tree bark and fuzzy winter buds. In late February, you do best to stick to the arboretum's paved loop, from which you might see snowdrops by the thousand, wonderful yellow winter aconite, witch hazels and their close relatives the hazels.
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As part of its celebration of the "magic of evergreens," Tyler Arboretum will offer holiday wreath and centerpiece workshops, a Christmas greens sale and outdoor rambles. At 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, participants can create an unusual three-foot tabletop topiary using freshly cut evergreen boughs, holly sprigs and other plant material from the arboretum's collection. At 12:30 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. Tuesday, a wreath and centerpiece workshop will be conducted by Tyler staff members.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A memorial service will be held April 9 for Gordon A. Brandes, 84, a retired botanist and former manager of the University of Pennsylvania's Morris Arboretum. The service will be held at the arboretum, 100 Northwestern Ave. Mr. Brandes died Jan. 12 at the Springfield Residence retirement community in Wyndmoor. He had pulmonary disease and cancer. He was employed by Rohm & Haas Co. from the mid-1940s until 1972, when he retired as manager of agricultural product development.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | By PETER BINZEN
In the years before World War II, F. Otto Haas, son of the founder of the Rohm & Haas Co., courted his wife, Dorothy, at the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill. "We'd sit under the trees and read Saturday Evening Post stories," he recalled the other day. "Those were simpler times. " The arboretum didn't really amount to much then. It was administered by the University of Pennsylvania, which had no money to spend on the place and plenty of problems of its own. Penn couldn't maintain Compton, the fine old Victorian home of Lydia Morris and her bachelor brother, John, a millionaire ironmaker.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
The construction of a wooden deck for an education program at Tyler Arboretum in Lima will begin this month. The deck will be paid for by the Daniel B. McLaughlin Jr. Memorial Fund, which was set up after the 20-year-old Wallingford man died in an accidental fall from a train trestle in Swarthmore in July. (That tragedy was compounded last Thursday when George Plummer, 20, of Rose Valley, a friend who was with McLaughlin when he fell, jumped to his death from the same 80-foot-high trestle.
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