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NEWS
March 11, 2008
NOW THAT the SugarHouse casino project has been delayed, maybe permanently, to look for arrowheads and pottery scraps, we can rejoice in old Philadelphia! Certainly casinos will cause incredible traffic, and Philadelphia will be forced to modernize its archaic traffic infrastructure, which can be enjoyed by driving the comically counter-timed lights on Girard and basking in the 19th century charm of the city's lazy reliance on stop signs, which guarantees that traffic moves at wagon speed.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rodney S. Young staged his great archaeological campaigns at Gordion, Turkey, from 1950 to 1974, he commanded teams of natives and massive mining and drilling equipment to cut into giant earth-covered tombs. In 1957, the University of Pennsylvania scientist discovered the burial chamber believed to be that of King Midas. Later, he excavated the king's palace. But when a new team of archaeologists sponsored by the University Museum returns to the site during the next three summers, their plans will be more modest: gathering burnt seeds, charred animal bones and animal dung.
NEWS
August 24, 1993 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
THROUGH TIME, ACROSS CONTINENTS Dilys Winegrad University of Pennyslvania Press/$80 When British archaeologist Howard Carter discovered King Tut's tomb, he was asked if he could see anything in the darkened chamber. With the aid of a candle's wavering light, he peered inside. "Yes," he replied, "wonderful things. " The same reaction has occurred to countless visitors to the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The University Museum is one of the world's leading repositories of artifacts and information on ancient civilizations and traditional cultures.
NEWS
February 13, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a spring morning in 1978, a year before the Iranian Islamic revolution, Ezat O. Negahban was stabbed repeatedly by the shah's secret police as he entered the University of Tehran, where he was dean of the faculty of letters and humanities. After a taxi got him to a hospital, doctors found he had bled so badly that he had no blood pressure, and they had to determine his blood type by what was caked to his clothes. For a year, he lost the use of his left arm because a nerve had been cut. Mr. Negahban retired that year, but it wasn't until 1980 that he moved to Philadelphia, because the Iran-Iraq war had closed their borders during his visit to Europe.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
Mark Scalley, a sixth-grade student at Wissahickon Middle School, was bubbling over with excitement as he showed his teacher what appeared to be a mud-covered chunk of metal. "Is it something good?" Mark asked breathlessly, his face streaked with dirt one afternoon last week. Mary Banks chipped away some of the mud with an old toothbrush and quickly determined that it was nothing more than obsidian, a type of shiny black rock that is common to the area. Momentarily disappointed that he had not unearthed something more exciting, like a dinosaur tooth or the remnants of a buried treasure, Mark returned to the 5-by-5-foot pit not far from the high school football field and resumed scraping the ground with his trowel.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The popular public archaeology lab at Independence National Historical Park, forced from its long-time home at Third and Chestnut Streets by a land deal undertaken by the park and a private group, will not reopen in its new quarters for up to two years, park officials said this week. When they closed it in June, the officials predicted a late-summer reopening for the lab, which is analyzing a million artifacts unearthed in the park a decade ago. Although the move from the old park visitor's center to the First Bank of the United States building directly across the street has been contemplated for almost a year, park officials said they belatedly determined that the bank's electrical and cooling facilities were inadequate.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anne Cabot Ogilvy, 69, a scholar who played an active role in Middle Eastern archaeology, died of a heart attack Monday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. She was a resident of the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia for the last 15 years and had lived in New York City and in Carson City, Nev. During the 1970s, Mrs. Ogilvy ventured countless times to dusty digs in inhospitable places to analyze animal bones unearthed by her colleagues. Later, she helped establish a comprehensive academic and archaeological library at the headquarters of the American Center for Oriental Research, in Amman, Jordan.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a career of excavating in Greece, archaeologist Charles K. Williams 2d has dug deep into his own pocket to donate $16 million to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, by far the largest gift in its 114-year history and one of the most generous ever to a Philadelphia museum. The contribution by Williams, 70, who earned his doctorate at Penn, launches a six-year, $55 million fund drive to refurbish the historic but antiquated facility that houses more than a million artifacts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before and after Twenty-One, the fixed quiz show that the film Quiz Show has made infamous again, there was What in the World. William H. "Bill" Davenport remembers it well. He appeared as a contestant several times back in the 1960s. What in the World was an archaeological TV quiz show that challenged experts to display their knowledge (or admit their lack of it). The show, with brilliant if often curmudgeonly scholars one-upping each other, had exotica, excitement, entertainment, suspense and laughs.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During volunteer archaeological work in Laos in 2007, retired businessman William F. Henderson came upon something more exotic than million-year-old pottery. Snake soup. "One of our Lao colleagues arrived one evening with a quite impressive snake, about seven feet long," he wrote. "When he removed the snake's head, there appeared to be another snake head inside. He began pulling it and withdrew a second snake that had been eaten whole. . . . "I did have some broth the next day that was pretty good," he wrote, but he did not ask whether the snakes had contributed to it. On Sunday, Mr. Henderson, 81, who for 18 years was a volunteer at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died of lung cancer at his home in Glen Mills.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
It would be hard for any real-life archaeologist to match the fictional Indiana Jones, but Julian Siggers gives it a good run. Siggers, 50, director of the Penn Museum since July 2012, may not crack a bullwhip or sport a battered fedora, but he does have a fondness for motorcycles and tattoos. He's also handsome, charming, and possessed of an impressive academic pedigree, including a doctorate from the University of Toronto in Near Eastern prehistoric archaeology. Born in England and educated at University College London, he came to Penn from the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where he was vice president for programs, education, and content communication.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hessians were out for blood that autumn day in 1777. They marched 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, hoping to surprise the American defenders of Fort Mercer on the Delaware River. Instead, they fell into a trap. Many of Britain's German allies passed over the abandoned earthen walls topped with pointed logs, and then cheered, thinking they'd breached the fort and were close to victory. On the other side, though, was another wall - and a deadly hail of artillery and musket fire that cut through their ranks like a scythe.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dave Schwartz was a boy, his father was constantly in the hospital, and his mother would drop him at the Penn Museum while she visited her husband. Beginning in 1961, when he was 8, Schwartz spent years among the mummies, the giant sphinx, and other antiquities. "I'm kind of a museum orphan," he says now, at age 61. "I literally grew up in that museum. " One day, he was tracing hieroglyphs on a 10-foot-tall Mayan limestone monument - his sketches spread all over the floor of the Mesoamerican Gallery - when an older man in a suit stopped and asked the boy what he was doing.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There is nothing like a dome. Especially when it's as soaring and serene as the one that spans the Chinese rotunda at the Renaissance-style Penn Museum. The tiled canopy rests as lightly as a soap bubble on the walls of the rotunda, 90 feet above our heads, and the spare, unadorned walls make us feel as if we were entering an ancient sanctuary. When this section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology opened on South Street in 1916, visitors marveled at the structure's gravity-defying grace and openness.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
ISSUE | ENERGY Dig for true costs In news coverage on the Oct. 13 rupture of the Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. Mid-Valley pipeline, which spilled 168,000 gallons of crude oil into a Louisiana creek, it has been noted that the pipeline is 65 years old - the age of retirement. Even so, pumping through the 65-year-old, cast-iron underground pipeline has resumed. Similarly, this region's Mariner East pipeline may soon be pumping gas from the Marcellus Shale wells, and it is 83 years old. It is time for energy companies to put money from their profit margins toward pipeline maintenance.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Monge knew for years that the Penn Museum had quite the skeleton in its closet, a box of bones supinely displayed, carefully encased in wax, wrapped in burlap, and positioned on a board. "Somebody took great pains to take a very fragmentary skeleton and bring it here," said Monge, the curator who oversees the physical anthropology section of the museum in University City. "Therefore, it must be important. " There was no catalog card or identifying information. So the skeleton sat obscurely for years in a ground-floor storage room at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, founded in 1887, amassed many of its treasures during the so-called golden age of museum collecting - an era well known for unprecedented institution-building, less so for cultural sensitivity. (The decades since have brought negotiations and lawsuits over the repatriation of artifacts to various tribes and nations.) That backdrop provides a striking contrast with the museum's newest exhibition, Native American Voices: The People - Here and Now , which opens Saturday.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the University of Pennsylvania's 15-ton stone sphinx was brought to Philadelphia from the ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis, its much-anticipated delivery was delayed by, among other things, the 1913 World Series. "Once it arrived in Philadelphia, because the World Series had started, they couldn't get dock workers to unload it," said Alessandro Pezzati, archivist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the sphinx's home for the last century.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deirdre Kelleher spent Wednesday with her head in a hole, arm-deep in dirt. This is the Temple University anthropology doctoral student's second summer orchestrating a "public archaeology" excavation in Old City's historic Elfreth's Alley. Kelleher and a crew of volunteers are searching for clues about the lives of 19th-century immigrants, in one of the first projects of its kind in Philadelphia. "The 19th century is overshadowed by previous history," said Michele Schutte, assistant and curator at the Elfreth's Alley Museum, referring to Philadelphia's fascination with colonial times.
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