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Archer Daniels Midland

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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman
Since 1981, a corporation that has pleaded guilty to price-fixing has sponsored a Sunday talk show with great influence over national public policy debates. The host of the show and the chairman of the corporation are close friends. They are neighbors at a Florida resort. They party together. The show's host has a political philosophy that fits well with that of the show's sponsor. When discussing crime, the host focuses exclusively on street crime, despite growing evidence that corporate crime and violence harm society more than all street crime combined.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
When Americans bite into a juicy steak, cut into a birthday cake or take a dose of vitamins, chances are Archer Daniels Midland Co. had a hand in preparing those products. The Decatur, Ill. agriculture company, which processes about a third of the nation's grain and soybeans, sells products that feed livestock, make flour and provide the basics for dietary supplements. But Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) has been shaken by reports that the company is the target of a price-fixing probe and that a top executive had been an FBI informant.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County judge rejected residents' final attempt to derail an industrial park near the Falls-Lower Makefield border, dismissing their appeal after their attorney failed to appear. Members of the Lower Bucks Neighborhood Coalition, which includes attorney Stevan Kip Portman and his family and residents Gregg Lorenz and Stacey Schroeder, sued the township in January to keep corn syrup company Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from putting a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in a Conrail industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hi, we're Archer Daniels Midland. We don't smell. And we make as little noise as possible. So said company representatives during a Planning Commission meeting in Falls Wednesday. ADM, the first would-be tenant for a proposed industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway, gave commission members a presentation of its corn storage facilities, assuring township officials and about 30 residents that it would not be a detriment to the neighborhood. "This is a first-class cleanly operation that will have no negative impact on the community," said Tom Hecker, an attorney for ADM. Commission members are awaiting a decision from supervisors on Conrail's proposal to develop the 81-acre rail yard that ADM wants to move into.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Planning Commission officials will not recommend a storage operation that Archer Daniels Midland had proposed building in the township. In a unanimous vote last night, the seven-member board said the proposed ADM facility did not meet zoning requirements. Board members also criticized Conrail for its proposals involving the ADM site. ADM, which manufactures corn syrup and other corn byproducts, wants to be the first tenant in Conrail's 81-acre industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of Lower Bucks residents has again taken its fight over an industrial park to court, charging that the supervisors ignored their own zoning laws when they approved construction plans submitted by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM). Members of the Lower Bucks Neighborhood Coalition filed the suit last week in Bucks County Court to keep ADM from putting a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in a Conrail industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway. "We don't want to keep them out," said Stevan Kip Portman, attorney for the coalition, which includes residents from Lower Makefield, Falls and Bristol Townships.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For months, supervisors have been the referees in a heavyweight title fight between corn syrup producer Archer Daniels Midland and residents in the Hedgerow Woods neighborhood. Last week, township officials called the match. And ADM won. ADM will build a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in Conrail's 81-acre Industrial Park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway. Supervisors voted, 3-2, to let ADM build, saying they faced an $8 million lawsuit from Conrail if they did not give approval.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Consolidated Rail Corp. and Archer Daniels Midland Co. are traveling a rutted road in their effort to develop a multimillion-dollar warehouse and distribution terminal in this township. Last week, in an effort to secure approval of the $9 million industrial development and assuage the Board of Supervisors' demands for repairs to the Woolston Tunnel, Conrail proposed a deal. The company said it would do about $70,000 worth of repairs to the crumbling 1920s overpass, but only as part of the total ADM project.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than 100 residents from Stony Hill Road neighborhoods showed up for a Planning Commission meeting, angry about plans for a corn-syrup warehouse and distribution center that would also bring 500,000-gallon storage tanks, increased rail lines, and truck traffic. But when the commission tabled the issue to allow a township planner's review, dozens remained in the hallway and held a meeting anyway. For almost an hour, they tacked blueprints to the walls, leafed through a traffic study, exchanged phone numbers, and made plans to show up in force again.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Steve Rothwell and Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Investors started the week on a cautious note, pulling the Standard & Poor's 500 index down from the five-year high it reached Friday. The move lower on Monday is likely the result of traders taking some winnings off the table after the stock market's surge last week, said Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist at S&P Capital IQ. Investors are also preparing for corporate America's seasonal parade of earnings reports, which will start Tuesday. "You can summarize it as profit-taking and preparation," Stovall said.
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BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Christina Rexrode and Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The stock market bounced back Tuesday following a surge in U.S. home prices and signs of recovery in Europe's economy. Strong earnings reports also helped power the gains. The Dow Jones industrial average ended the day 99.22 points higher at 13,979.30, erasing a large part of its loss from Monday. The index traded above 14,000 during the day before falling back in the last hour. The Standard & Poor's 500 gained 15.58 points to 1,511.29. The Nasdaq composite was up 40.41 points to 3,171.58.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Steve Rothwell and Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Investors started the week on a cautious note, pulling the Standard & Poor's 500 index down from the five-year high it reached Friday. The move lower on Monday is likely the result of traders taking some winnings off the table after the stock market's surge last week, said Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist at S&P Capital IQ. Investors are also preparing for corporate America's seasonal parade of earnings reports, which will start Tuesday. "You can summarize it as profit-taking and preparation," Stovall said.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman
Since 1981, a corporation that has pleaded guilty to price-fixing has sponsored a Sunday talk show with great influence over national public policy debates. The host of the show and the chairman of the corporation are close friends. They are neighbors at a Florida resort. They party together. The show's host has a political philosophy that fits well with that of the show's sponsor. When discussing crime, the host focuses exclusively on street crime, despite growing evidence that corporate crime and violence harm society more than all street crime combined.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County judge rejected residents' final attempt to derail an industrial park near the Falls-Lower Makefield border, dismissing their appeal after their attorney failed to appear. Members of the Lower Bucks Neighborhood Coalition, which includes attorney Stevan Kip Portman and his family and residents Gregg Lorenz and Stacey Schroeder, sued the township in January to keep corn syrup company Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from putting a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in a Conrail industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of Lower Bucks residents has again taken its fight over an industrial park to court, charging that the supervisors ignored their own zoning laws when they approved construction plans submitted by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM). Members of the Lower Bucks Neighborhood Coalition filed the suit last week in Bucks County Court to keep ADM from putting a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in a Conrail industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway. "We don't want to keep them out," said Stevan Kip Portman, attorney for the coalition, which includes residents from Lower Makefield, Falls and Bristol Townships.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For months, supervisors have been the referees in a heavyweight title fight between corn syrup producer Archer Daniels Midland and residents in the Hedgerow Woods neighborhood. Last week, township officials called the match. And ADM won. ADM will build a 13.5-acre storage and distribution site in Conrail's 81-acre Industrial Park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway. Supervisors voted, 3-2, to let ADM build, saying they faced an $8 million lawsuit from Conrail if they did not give approval.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Planning Commission officials will not recommend a storage operation that Archer Daniels Midland had proposed building in the township. In a unanimous vote last night, the seven-member board said the proposed ADM facility did not meet zoning requirements. Board members also criticized Conrail for its proposals involving the ADM site. ADM, which manufactures corn syrup and other corn byproducts, wants to be the first tenant in Conrail's 81-acre industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES The Associated Press, Bloomberg Business News and Reuters contributed to this report
Archer Daniels Midland Co., a $6 billion company that calls itself "supermarket to the world," said yesterday it will plead guilty to two price-fixing charges and pay $100 million in fines. Analysts hailed the settlement and fines, the largest ever for a criminal antitrust case, as a good deal for ADM, which produces agricultural products ranging from components of shampoo, detergents and soft drinks to feed additives that make pigs and chickens larger and leaner. "This is not going to affect their balance sheet in any meaningful way," said NatWest Securities analyst David Nelson.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Spanish, sereno means serene. Tell that to Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and the rail company that serves it, residents in Los Angeles' El Sereno neighborhood say. They say the corn syrup producer, which has proposed a facility to the Falls Township Planning Commission, is not a quiet neighbor. Manuel Perez says he takes sleeping pills because of noise from the plant. Charles Sudduth, weary of constant banging and high-pitched warning whistles, joined with other residents to file a lawsuit against the Southern Pacific Railroad demanding sound buffers around the plant.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hi, we're Archer Daniels Midland. We don't smell. And we make as little noise as possible. So said company representatives during a Planning Commission meeting in Falls Wednesday. ADM, the first would-be tenant for a proposed industrial park between Route 1 and Old Lincoln Highway, gave commission members a presentation of its corn storage facilities, assuring township officials and about 30 residents that it would not be a detriment to the neighborhood. "This is a first-class cleanly operation that will have no negative impact on the community," said Tom Hecker, an attorney for ADM. Commission members are awaiting a decision from supervisors on Conrail's proposal to develop the 81-acre rail yard that ADM wants to move into.
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