FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexander Ewing, 93, of Media, a Philadelphia architect who started out with 30 workers in 1961 and with Stanley Cole built EwingCole, an engineering and design firm with offices on both coasts, died Friday, May 29, at home. The cause of death was complications from a stroke, his family said. Mr. Ewing worked with his father, architect George M. Ewing, from 1945 through 1960. In 1961, he broke off and formed his own firm, initially called Alexander Ewing & Associates. One of Mr. Ewing's first projects was the completion of the Rohm & Haas Building (now Dow Chemical)
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shraga Berenfeld, 73, of Philadelphia, an architect known for his eco-friendly buildings here and abroad, died Friday, May 16, of respiratory arrest at Hahnemann University Hospital. Born in Siberia, Mr. Berenfeld moved to Israel and then to the United States in 1964. After a stay in New York, he came to the Philadelphia area. Working for most of the time under the company name Design and Build Architects in Wynnewood, Mr. Berenfeld spent more than three decades doing design and construction work.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jonathan Dyer, 68, of Wynnewood, a longtime architect in the Philadelphia area, died Sunday, May 4, of lymphoma at home. Born in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Dyer was a graduate of the Haverford School and Princeton University. In 1967, he got his start working for the architectural firm Vincent G. Kling & Associates. He designed master plans for Washington National (now Reagan National) Airport and Philadelphia International Airport. In 1971, Mr. Dyer and his family moved to London so he could join T.P. Bennett & Son, a firm that specialized in urban public projects.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Amburn, 64, whose dreams of becoming an architect were realized in a long career of cutting-edge design in Philadelphia, died of cancer Tuesday, April 10, at his home in Hayesville, N.C., where he had lived since 2011. "From the time he was a little boy ... he designed homes with Lincoln Logs," said Mr. Amburn's sister, Peggy Epton. "And I don't remember him ever wanting to do anything else other than architecture. " In 2008, Mayor Nutter recognized Mr. Amburn, a partner in the Center City firm Amburn/Jarosinski, with an appointment to the Philadelphia Historical Commission, where he headed its architectural review commission.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Stefan Kurylowicz, 62, a Polish architect who helped modernize Warsaw in the two decades after the collapse of communism, was among four Poles killed Monday when their two small planes crashed in Spain, an associate said Tuesday. Mr. Kurylowicz (pronounced Kur-eh-WOH-vich ) was "a Renaissance man," the Polish news agency PAP said. Born in Warsaw in 1949, he helped shape the capital as it evolved from a city dominated by drab communist-era architecture to a modern city dotted with tall glass and steel structures - some of the architect's creation.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nathan Kagan, 78, of Penn Valley, a retired architect, died from complications of Parkinson's disease Tuesday, May 10, at Saunders House in Wynnewood. Mr. Kagan ended his career as chief architect for Amtrak, representing the railroad's interests in the design of the Cira Centre, a 29-story skyscraper built in 2004 over tracks next to 30th Street Station. After emigrating from South Africa to Philadelphia in 1978, Mr. Kagan worked for a number of architectural firms and developers.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. McDowell Jr., 85, an architect from Chestnut Hill, died Monday, Jan. 19, of complications from dementia at Springfield Residence in Wyndmoor, where he had lived for seven years. Mr. McDowell was born in Chestnut Hill and attended Chestnut Hill Academy until ninth grade, when the school closed during World War II. He transferred and graduated from St. Andrews School in Middletown, Del. He was a member of the Class of 1951 at Princeton University, where he played rugby. Mr. McDowell went on to study architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1954 with high honors.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley M. Cole, 89, a principal in the firm of EwingCole and chief architect of Citizens Bank Park, died Tuesday, March 12, of complications from pneumonia at Paoli Hospital. Joseph T. Kelly, chairman and chief executive of EwingCole, remembered Mr. Cole as "a great leader and a good person. We are all indebted to Stan for the opportunities he helped provide for us. He will be sorely missed. " Mr. Cole began his career in 1948 after graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a bachelor's degree in architecture and engineering.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Nelson Kise II, 75, a Philadelphia architect and urban planner who left his aesthetic mark on the local landscape but whose touch was felt as far away as Venezuela and Egypt, died Wednesday, Dec. 26, of a heart ailment at his home in Freeport, Maine. Mr. Kise was a principal of Kise, Straw & Kolodner, the firm he cofounded in 1984 from the remnants of David A. Crane & Partners. In the role of architect and planner for many high-profile projects, Mr. Kise blended his advocacy of contemporary design with what he saw as the need to preserve historic buildings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexander Ewing, 93, of Media, a Philadelphia architect who started out with 30 workers in 1961 and with Stanley Cole built EwingCole, an engineering and design firm with offices on both coasts, died Friday, May 29, at home. The cause of death was complications from a stroke, his family said. Mr. Ewing worked with his father, architect George M. Ewing, from 1945 through 1960. In 1961, he broke off and formed his own firm, initially called Alexander Ewing & Associates. One of Mr. Ewing's first projects was the completion of the Rohm & Haas Building (now Dow Chemical)
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Duncan Wray Buell, 87, of Philadelphia, an architect, died Friday, April 24, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Extended Care Center. Mr. Buell was founding partner and later partner emeritus of the architectural firm of Buell Kratzer Powell in Center City. The company was established in 1995. Mr. Buell retired from day-to-day operations last year, but his influence continued to permeate the firm's design detailing. His hand sketches and renderings were left on the walls as a tribute and as inspiration to company employees.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Having lived through the rise of postmodernism and watched its ironic, pop-art treatment of classical forms filter through the culture - to the point where every strip mall was designed with a flattened pediment over the entrance - I never expected to feel any sympathy for that unfortunate architectural style. But after its champion Michael Graves died last month, I realized I finally have enough distance to look at the period's buildings as historical objects. PoMo, as it was usually called, probably reached its apogee in the early '80s, just when Philadelphia's fortunes were hitting rock bottom.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Harvey D. Wedeen, 87, of Center City, chairman of the keyboard department at Temple University's Boyer College of Music and Dance for nearly five decades and a force behind starting many of the school's degree programs, died Friday, March 13, at home. Mr. Wedeen became a faculty member at Temple in 1964, and was director of the well-regarded Temple University Music Institute at Ambler from 1971 to 1975 and the music festival's artistic director in 1974 and 1975. He helped establish the school's doctoral program in performance; the master's program in accompanying and chamber music; master's programs in piano performance and pedagogy; the Center City Temple Prep; and a program to bring free music lessons to local children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When Bob Carr was growing up in rural Homer, Ill., he didn't have a bedroom - or even a real bed. One of six children sharing a two-bedroom, one-bathroom house with parents and a grandmother, Carr and a brother slept in the middle of the living room on an old sofa bed. He remembers his high school wardrobe comprising three hand-me-down shirts, one pair of pants and shoes. And although his mother tried to keep things together by working as a night-shift waitress, life was a daily challenge with Carr's abusive, alcoholic father, largely unemployed and especially hostile to this son who tried endlessly to please him. Knowing that Dickensian tale makes it all the more meaningful that today, at 69, Carr is a successful businessman who lives in a sprawling Princeton Tudor - built in 1896 for Woodrow Wilson - that he restored to its original state.
REAL_ESTATE
February 22, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps it's the bitter memory of last winter's polar vortex, or maybe it's just the volatile price of fuel, but homeowners are warming to fireplaces. Contractors and architects say their home-renovation and new-construction customers are eager to include fireplaces of all kinds in their projects - gas inserts, wood-burning, electric units that double as house heaters, even outdoor fireplaces. Ed Barnhart, principal at Always by Design architects and designers in Center City, recently contracted with two buyers of new houses.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. McDowell Jr., 85, an architect from Chestnut Hill, died Monday, Jan. 19, of complications from dementia at Springfield Residence in Wyndmoor, where he had lived for seven years. Mr. McDowell was born in Chestnut Hill and attended Chestnut Hill Academy until ninth grade, when the school closed during World War II. He transferred and graduated from St. Andrews School in Middletown, Del. He was a member of the Class of 1951 at Princeton University, where he played rugby. Mr. McDowell went on to study architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1954 with high honors.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Muscoe Burnett Martin Jr., 59, an architect who designed environmentally responsible buildings long before the term build green became widely accepted, died Sunday, Dec. 28, of cancer at his home in Philadelphia. Mr. Martin used sustainable design to create the Environmental Education Center at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Tinicum, the Horticulture Center for the University of Pennsylvania's Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill, and the Stroud Water Research Center in Chester County.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
John P.A. Todd, 88, a retired architect, died Monday, Dec. 22, of heart failure at Artman in Ambler. Never without his signature bow tie and designer glasses, Mr. Todd, a longtime Chestnut Hill resident, was known best to friends for his sense of humor, adventurous spirit, chicken dinners made with Campbell's soup and a lot of sherry, and devotion to his family. Mr. Todd was born in North Stonington, Conn. He and his family moved to Wyncote, and he attended Germantown Friends School, graduating in 1945.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The story of West Chester investment adviser Rich Weinstein shows that sometimes even the White House is no match for one angry citizen with a fast Internet connection and plenty of determination. Last week, Weinstein's relentless archive-diving on the intellectual origins of the Obamacare health insurance law helped put MIT economist Jonathan Gruber, often hailed as an "architect" of the plan, in the dock for hours of embarrassing interrogation from the U.S. House Oversight Committee.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|