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NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shraga Berenfeld, 73, of Philadelphia, an architect known for his eco-friendly buildings here and abroad, died Friday, May 16, of respiratory arrest at Hahnemann University Hospital. Born in Siberia, Mr. Berenfeld moved to Israel and then to the United States in 1964. After a stay in New York, he came to the Philadelphia area. Working for most of the time under the company name Design and Build Architects in Wynnewood, Mr. Berenfeld spent more than three decades doing design and construction work.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jonathan Dyer, 68, of Wynnewood, a longtime architect in the Philadelphia area, died Sunday, May 4, of lymphoma at home. Born in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Dyer was a graduate of the Haverford School and Princeton University. In 1967, he got his start working for the architectural firm Vincent G. Kling & Associates. He designed master plans for Washington National (now Reagan National) Airport and Philadelphia International Airport. In 1971, Mr. Dyer and his family moved to London so he could join T.P. Bennett & Son, a firm that specialized in urban public projects.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alexander Ewing, 93, of Media, a Philadelphia architect who started out with 30 workers in 1961 and with Stanley Cole built EwingCole, an engineering and design firm with offices on both coasts, died Friday, May 29, at home. The cause of death was complications from a stroke, his family said. Mr. Ewing worked with his father, architect George M. Ewing, from 1945 through 1960. In 1961, he broke off and formed his own firm, initially called Alexander Ewing & Associates. One of Mr. Ewing's first projects was the completion of the Rohm & Haas Building (now Dow Chemical)
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Amburn, 64, whose dreams of becoming an architect were realized in a long career of cutting-edge design in Philadelphia, died of cancer Tuesday, April 10, at his home in Hayesville, N.C., where he had lived since 2011. "From the time he was a little boy ... he designed homes with Lincoln Logs," said Mr. Amburn's sister, Peggy Epton. "And I don't remember him ever wanting to do anything else other than architecture. " In 2008, Mayor Nutter recognized Mr. Amburn, a partner in the Center City firm Amburn/Jarosinski, with an appointment to the Philadelphia Historical Commission, where he headed its architectural review commission.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Stefan Kurylowicz, 62, a Polish architect who helped modernize Warsaw in the two decades after the collapse of communism, was among four Poles killed Monday when their two small planes crashed in Spain, an associate said Tuesday. Mr. Kurylowicz (pronounced Kur-eh-WOH-vich ) was "a Renaissance man," the Polish news agency PAP said. Born in Warsaw in 1949, he helped shape the capital as it evolved from a city dominated by drab communist-era architecture to a modern city dotted with tall glass and steel structures - some of the architect's creation.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nathan Kagan, 78, of Penn Valley, a retired architect, died from complications of Parkinson's disease Tuesday, May 10, at Saunders House in Wynnewood. Mr. Kagan ended his career as chief architect for Amtrak, representing the railroad's interests in the design of the Cira Centre, a 29-story skyscraper built in 2004 over tracks next to 30th Street Station. After emigrating from South Africa to Philadelphia in 1978, Mr. Kagan worked for a number of architectural firms and developers.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. McDowell Jr., 85, an architect from Chestnut Hill, died Monday, Jan. 19, of complications from dementia at Springfield Residence in Wyndmoor, where he had lived for seven years. Mr. McDowell was born in Chestnut Hill and attended Chestnut Hill Academy until ninth grade, when the school closed during World War II. He transferred and graduated from St. Andrews School in Middletown, Del. He was a member of the Class of 1951 at Princeton University, where he played rugby. Mr. McDowell went on to study architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1954 with high honors.
NEWS
October 24, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis G. Vitetta, 83, of Spring House, an architect whose firm built or restored many notable structures in Philadelphia and New Jersey, died Thursday, Oct. 15, of a heart attack at home. Known as Frank, Mr. Vitetta was born in Mamaroneck, N.Y., after his parents came to this country from Italy. He attended F.E. Bellows High School and the University of Pennsylvania, graduating with a degree in architecture and engineering. Starting in the early 1980s, his company, the Vitetta Group, created public buildings known for efficiency and functionality.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Nelson Kise II, 75, a Philadelphia architect and urban planner who left his aesthetic mark on the local landscape but whose touch was felt as far away as Venezuela and Egypt, died Wednesday, Dec. 26, of a heart ailment at his home in Freeport, Maine. Mr. Kise was a principal of Kise, Straw & Kolodner, the firm he cofounded in 1984 from the remnants of David A. Crane & Partners. In the role of architect and planner for many high-profile projects, Mr. Kise blended his advocacy of contemporary design with what he saw as the need to preserve historic buildings.
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NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Within hours of the June 5, 2013, collapse that crushed a Salvation Army thrift store in Center City, killing six people and injuring 13, Philadelphia architect Plato A. Marinakos Jr. had a lawyer. Marinakos, hired to oversee demolition of a building adjacent to the thrift store at 22nd and Market Streets, was granted immunity from prosecution and became the District Attorney's Office guide and interpreter of events leading to the collapse. He testified before a county grand jury and against the two men criminally charged, convicted, and sentenced to prison for causing the collapse.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Frank H. Radey Jr. was 10 or 11, "he used to carry his shotgun to school," in Collingswood, his wife, Patricia, said he told her. After he had plugged a rabbit near Newton Creek now and then, "he would throw it up on his father's sister's front porch. " And after Aunt Hilda had taken it in for a few hours, "he would pick it up on the way home, so his mother could cook it, make a stew for him. " In the early 1940s, his wife said, "he was allowed to take a gun into school," and leave it with an official.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | The Associated Press
The New York-based architectural firm that designed the Barnes Foundation Art Museum on the Parkway have been chosen to draw up plans for President Obama's presidential library in Chicago. The Barack Obama Foundation announced Thursday that Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects has been chosen for the library that will be built near the University of Chicago, where the president once taught constitutional law. Besides the Barnes, the married couple behind the firm have designed the David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago and the Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The heyday of the starchitect pretty much ended with the last recession, but there remains one rock-star designer who still commands the attention of people who normally pay little attention to the way buildings look: Bjarke Ingels. Just 41, the Danish-born architect has already been the subject of a New Yorker profile and a Charlie Rose interview . Ingels is a regular on the TED-talk circuit, and was in Philadelphia last month to give the prestigious Louis Kahn lecture . Part of Ingels' appeal is his ability to bring irreverence and fun to architecture, similar to what Ikea did with furniture.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | Historical Society of Pennyslvania
Despite its current associations with high living, for much of Rittenhouse Square's 300-plus-year history one was more likely to run into cattle or coal heavers than a member of the leisure class. Originally called Southwest Square, the park was one of the five such allotments planned by William Penn for his "greene country towne. " Unlike its four counterparts, it's the only square to not double as a burial ground. "Rittenhouse Square escaped this form of public service, probably because it was then the furthest removed from the center of population and the houses of worship," reads a pamphlet sent to residents in 1913.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
One side benefit of the construction of the massive retail-and-residential East Market project is that it has opened up views (temporarily, anyway) of the tightly packed commercial blocks between 11th and 12th Streets. For the first time in decades, you can clearly make out the colorful terra-cotta details on 15 S. 11th St., once a flagship location for the Horn & Hardart restaurant chain. The ornate, five-story structure was designed and built in 1912 by William Steele & Sons, the go-to developer of the day, on commission for Horn & Hardart.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Francis Kéré had to travel long and far from his tiny farming village in Burkina Faso , an African nation that skirts the edge of the Sahara, before he ended up with a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a boy of 7, he was sent away to a larger town to attend school. Later, he made his way to Germany to study architecture. In 2001, he took his design skills back to his village and fashioned a modern school out of handmade mud bricks. That one-story structure may look like a simple little schoolhouse - albeit one with a rakishly tilted metal roof - but its impact has reverberated around the globe, adding momentum to a movement known as public-interest architecture.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Architecture Critic
Romaldo Giurgola, 95, who was a member of an influential group of Philadelphia architects who pushed back against Modernist orthodoxies and helped make the city a hotbed of innovative design thinking in the 1960s, died Sunday, May 15, in Canberra, Australia, where he had lived since 1982. Mr. Giurgola, who was fondly known by colleagues as "Aldo," was a Roman native who moved to Philadelphia in the late 1950s to teach architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. He soon fell in with two other upstarts, Robert Venturi and Louis Kahn, who were also beginning to question Modernism's harsh, functionalist approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There's a big national convention coming to town that will give Philadelphia a chance to show off what a spiffy, exciting place it has become. No, not the Democrats; it's the American Institute of Architects. Some 19,000 of those exacting design minds will be prowling our streets next week, taking measure of our stone citadels, peering at our construction sites, and generally giving us a professional once-over. What will they make of the things we've built? The visiting architects will find Philadelphia is a very different city from the one they experienced in 2000, the last time the AIA held its convention here.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University has selected Moody Nolan, which calls itself the largest African American-owned and -managed architecture firm in the country, to design a proposed football stadium for its North Philadelphia neighborhood, officials announced Monday. Curtis J. Moody, president and CEO of the Columbus, Ohio-based company, already has met with community members, said Ray Betzner, a university spokesman. Betzner said the firm's willingness to work with neighbors made it a clear choice for the job. "Moody Nolan is regarded as a national leader in designing beautiful sports and recreation facilities that not only fit their purpose but also fit the communities in which they exist," Temple president Neil D. Theobald said in a statement.
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