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Architectural History

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NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Philadelphia area is so rich in architectural history, it will be hard to choose only a few examples to highlight when he speaks on the subject next week in Springfield Township, Bryan Van Sweden said. "Generally, Pennsylvania has a broad range of architecture and building styles," said Van Sweden, acting chief of grant programs at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission's Bureau for Historic Preservation. He said there are very good examples of just about any kind of building.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TRAVEL THE WORLD, and it's hard not to trip over the many monuments and museums commemorating war and strife. But John Connors wants to know: Where are the tributes to famous friendships? Connors is leading the charge to create a museum near Penn Treaty Park in Fishtown to honor the peace treaty William Penn made with Native Americans there in 1682. Although artists, politicians and preservationists have celebrated the historic pact made under a towering elm tree, it remains one of the most pivotal American moments that lacks a dedicated museum, Connors said.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joe Haro's profession is marketing, which he has taught at Camden County College, but one of his avocations is architecture. On Saturday, the Haddonfield resident will lead an architectural tour of his hometown, which he calls a "treasure trove" for architectural enthusiasts. "So many architectural styles from America's history are here, from Colonial taverns to Beaux Arts designs," said Haro, a member of the Philadelphia-based Foundation for Architecture, which is sponsoring the tour.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For historian John M. "Jeff" Groff, houses are more than bricks and sticks. They are tangible expressions of how people see themselves within the social order. Groff, of Strafford, is executive director of Wyck, a historic-house museum in Germantown where nine generations of one family lived from the 1690s through 1973. As an avocation, Groff for years has been compiling information on noteworthy old Main Line houses and estates. Name a historic Main Line mansion, and there is a good chance he can name the architect who designed it, the family that built it and the business in which the family prospered.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The white house on Main Street is falling down. Its back porch is unstable, and its windows are broken. Inside, the walls are decaying and the floors are covered in debris. John Haigis sees past the blight of the 19th-century house. "It has character," said Haigis, president of Darby Borough's Historical Commission. Home to the oldest continually operating free library in the United States and a Quaker meeting house that dates to 1805, Darby is rich in history. But the small Delaware County borough is not rich in resources.
NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For all his 80 years, there has been one constant in Joe Jordan's life: Cape May Point. Jordan wasn't born at the southern tip of the New Jersey Shore - he is from Philadelphia, where he lives during the winter - but his entire life, he has spent the summer at Cape May Point. "Like a lot of residents here, I've always loved the area and have been fascinated by it," said Jordan, whose curiosity about his Victorian cottage on Cape Avenue - he's the third generation to live there - prompted him to research the borough's past.
NEWS
March 23, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Penelope Hartshorne Batcheler, 78, the only woman on the team of historic preservationists who restored Independence Hall in the 1960s - an undertaking that led to the rebirth of the historical district - died of a stroke yesterday at Pennsylvania Hospital. She collapsed Saturday while cleaning ice off her car parked behind her Society Hill home. "Penny had a skilled, determined passion for researching architectural historical details," said John Milner, an architect and member of the National Park Service team in the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013
By Joseph Minardi Schiffer Publishing. 272 pp. $50 Reviewed by Judy Hill More than once, wobbling on a bicycle atop the uneven cobblestones of Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill, I've cursed the irregular surface, wishing for smooth, predictable asphalt. According to Joseph Minardi's new history of Northwest Philadelphia, I have little to grumble about. Compared with the 1700s at least, when Germantown Avenue was known as "the worst road in America. " Wagons routinely became mired in deep mud, and horses were so badly injured after the six-mile trek from Center City to Germantown that they frequently had to be put down.
NEWS
July 6, 1996
THE MALL PLANS: A GREAT CHANCE, OR SELLING SYMBOLS? The Independence Mall plan put forward by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (Inquirer, July 2) is Philadelphia's best chance in a generation to make itself work for visitors and residents alike. We will continue to hear quibbles and suggestions from other architects, but that is par for the course. There is no single best way to solve any architectural problem, and opinions will always vary. The diversity of views should not distract the Park Service, the Pew Charitable Trusts, or anyone else from supporting and creating the Gateway Visitors' Center on the Mall at Market Street.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
William Woys Weaver of Devon is a full-time, professional food historian, a specialty so rare that he believes he is just one of two in the country. His view of his job is a broad one, aimed at telling the story of a place by its food, among other characteristics. "We can fire people up about history because we can bring it alive through food," he said. "I see food as an object and in relationship to its molds or tools," Weaver said. "Many are art forms on their own," he asserted as he explained why his writings appeal to art publishers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The white house on Main Street is falling down. Its back porch is unstable, and its windows are broken. Inside, the walls are decaying and the floors are covered in debris. John Haigis sees past the blight of the 19th-century house. "It has character," said Haigis, president of Darby Borough's Historical Commission. Home to the oldest continually operating free library in the United States and a Quaker meeting house that dates to 1805, Darby is rich in history. But the small Delaware County borough is not rich in resources.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TRAVEL THE WORLD, and it's hard not to trip over the many monuments and museums commemorating war and strife. But John Connors wants to know: Where are the tributes to famous friendships? Connors is leading the charge to create a museum near Penn Treaty Park in Fishtown to honor the peace treaty William Penn made with Native Americans there in 1682. Although artists, politicians and preservationists have celebrated the historic pact made under a towering elm tree, it remains one of the most pivotal American moments that lacks a dedicated museum, Connors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013
By Joseph Minardi Schiffer Publishing. 272 pp. $50 Reviewed by Judy Hill More than once, wobbling on a bicycle atop the uneven cobblestones of Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill, I've cursed the irregular surface, wishing for smooth, predictable asphalt. According to Joseph Minardi's new history of Northwest Philadelphia, I have little to grumble about. Compared with the 1700s at least, when Germantown Avenue was known as "the worst road in America. " Wagons routinely became mired in deep mud, and horses were so badly injured after the six-mile trek from Center City to Germantown that they frequently had to be put down.
NEWS
March 23, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Penelope Hartshorne Batcheler, 78, the only woman on the team of historic preservationists who restored Independence Hall in the 1960s - an undertaking that led to the rebirth of the historical district - died of a stroke yesterday at Pennsylvania Hospital. She collapsed Saturday while cleaning ice off her car parked behind her Society Hill home. "Penny had a skilled, determined passion for researching architectural historical details," said John Milner, an architect and member of the National Park Service team in the 1960s.
LIVING
November 4, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
All right, raise your hands: How many of you know what a punch board is? The prize goes to the older gentleman from the South, who recalls them in luncheonettes and other gathering places 60-some years ago. On a board of about 720 potentially award-winning holes, you paid about a nickel to punch one and withdraw a tightly wrapped piece of paper that sometimes said you'd won money, usually about $5. On Sunday, Barry S. Slosberg Inc. will...
NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Philadelphia area is so rich in architectural history, it will be hard to choose only a few examples to highlight when he speaks on the subject next week in Springfield Township, Bryan Van Sweden said. "Generally, Pennsylvania has a broad range of architecture and building styles," said Van Sweden, acting chief of grant programs at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission's Bureau for Historic Preservation. He said there are very good examples of just about any kind of building.
NEWS
August 31, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For all his 80 years, there has been one constant in Joe Jordan's life: Cape May Point. Jordan wasn't born at the southern tip of the New Jersey Shore - he is from Philadelphia, where he lives during the winter - but his entire life, he has spent the summer at Cape May Point. "Like a lot of residents here, I've always loved the area and have been fascinated by it," said Jordan, whose curiosity about his Victorian cottage on Cape Avenue - he's the third generation to live there - prompted him to research the borough's past.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joe Haro's profession is marketing, which he has taught at Camden County College, but one of his avocations is architecture. On Saturday, the Haddonfield resident will lead an architectural tour of his hometown, which he calls a "treasure trove" for architectural enthusiasts. "So many architectural styles from America's history are here, from Colonial taverns to Beaux Arts designs," said Haro, a member of the Philadelphia-based Foundation for Architecture, which is sponsoring the tour.
NEWS
July 6, 1996
THE MALL PLANS: A GREAT CHANCE, OR SELLING SYMBOLS? The Independence Mall plan put forward by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (Inquirer, July 2) is Philadelphia's best chance in a generation to make itself work for visitors and residents alike. We will continue to hear quibbles and suggestions from other architects, but that is par for the course. There is no single best way to solve any architectural problem, and opinions will always vary. The diversity of views should not distract the Park Service, the Pew Charitable Trusts, or anyone else from supporting and creating the Gateway Visitors' Center on the Mall at Market Street.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For historian John M. "Jeff" Groff, houses are more than bricks and sticks. They are tangible expressions of how people see themselves within the social order. Groff, of Strafford, is executive director of Wyck, a historic-house museum in Germantown where nine generations of one family lived from the 1690s through 1973. As an avocation, Groff for years has been compiling information on noteworthy old Main Line houses and estates. Name a historic Main Line mansion, and there is a good chance he can name the architect who designed it, the family that built it and the business in which the family prospered.
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