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Arctic

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LIVING
November 16, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bewitched by the fearsome but strangely compelling Arctic landscape, Susan Kaplan abandoned plans for a career focused on the sunny islands of the South Pacific and turned north. The decision eventually led Kaplan, an archaeologist and anthropologist, to Philadelphia in search of the secrets of four remarkable explorers. That search has culminated in "Raven's Journey: the World of Alaska's Native People," a centennial exhibition at the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
An Arctic explorer will be honored with a statue to be unveiled tomorrow in Camden. Matthew Henson is believed to be the first person to reach the North Pole, a feat he accomplished on April 6, 1909. But for decades the credit went to his exploring partner, Robert Peary. It's believed Henson, who died in the 1950s, did not get credit because he was black. He was recognized by Congress in the 1940s and later by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The statue in Camden is next to an abandoned church that organizers hope to turn into a maritime-history museum.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most comprehensive study to date of conditions in the Arctic shows that climate change has already transformed landscapes and ecosystems through Siberia, northern Canada, Alaska, Greenland, and other far northern regions. "The Arctic as we know it may soon be a thing of the past," said Eric Post, a biologist at Pennsylvania State University and the leader of the large, international team that put together the study, published in today's issue of the journal Science. In his 20 years of fieldwork in Greenland, Post said he's seen wild rhododendrons explode across the tundra, and once-abundant herds of caribou thinning to half their previous ranks.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with near dissolution last April, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia decided to cut back. One measure it took was to close its headquarters, with the intent of selling many mementos and decorations and much of its library at auction. On Thursday, the first batch of those items will be the highlight of Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc.'s first fall book sale. They include more than 500 books, most of them dealing with the Arctic and Antarctica, and almost two dozen curios, mostly from polar explorations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Lisa Liddane, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. - As with most veteran filmmakers and directors, Greg MacGillivray's imagination was lush with visions of how his new project might look. What he didn't picture when he started the new IMAX documentary To the Arctic was just how personal that project would get. For one thing, every member of his family of four - his wife Barbara, son Shaun, and daughter Meghan - participated behind the scenes. Eight years ago, Greg and Barbara cofounded the MacGillivray Freeman Films Educational Foundation, which aims to contribute to the conservation of natural and cultural resources through giant-screen films and companion educational programming.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 19th-century explorer and author Isaac Israel Hayes grew up in one of the most picturesque parts of Chester County. His childhood home in East Bradford, surrounded by lush meadows and overlooking the scenic Brandywine, was often described as one of the oldest residences in the county. He enjoyed fishing there, as well as family picnics at a popular retreat called Deborah's Rocks. Hayes' life at age 21 must have seemed a harrowing nightmare in comparison. A young surgeon, he found himself in the middle of the Arctic tundra, surviving on lamp lard and glacial moss, and living in a makeshift shelter built into a crevice.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some films feel off from the get-go. They don't hang together, despite the best intentions. Whiteout, a singularly unsuspenseful, unexciting, unthrilling Arctic thriller starring Underworld's Kate Beckinsale, isn't exactly one of these. It's even worse. Directed with minimal conviction by Dominic Sena (Gone in Sixty Seconds), Whiteout is a wipeout. The film opens with an exciting gunfight in a Soviet cargo plane as it speeds over Antarctica. It's 1957 and the plane is carrying some super-secret, super-important, and super-mysterious thing - the flick's MacGuffin.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From Alaska east to Siberia, the Arctic has been warmer this century than it has been at any time since 1600, according to a compilation of 29 different studies that used tree rings, ice samples, and other indirect tracers of past temperatures. While the lead researchers, Jonathan Overpeck and Ray Bradley, say they believe at least part of the measured warming of 2 to 3 degrees Fahrenheit stems from human-generated pollutants, they acknowledge that it is nearly impossible to detangle human-generated greenhouse warming from natural variations in temperature, such as those from volcanic eruptions and changes in the sun. "That's the $64,000 question," says Bradley, who is head of geosciences at the University of Massachusetts.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
Americo DiSantis talks about what makes a great meal in the Arctic and what's most important to take there with you. www.inquirer.com/disantis
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temperatures this week will remain several degrees above normal, torching the residual snow in a relentlessly balmy winter. In Anchorage, Alaska, that is. Around here, the overall upper-air pattern that has been draining frigid air out of Alaska is about to emphatically reinforce what has become a local February rarity - a prolonged cold spell that will include a shot at the first official zero reading in 21 years. "You stole our weather," Joe Wegman, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Anchorage, said Tuesday after the Philadelphia region experienced one of the gentler 4-inch snowfalls on record.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The bitter arctic chill that produced the region's coldest day since last January was blamed for at least one death Thursday, Philadelphia police said. An unidentified 64-year-old woman was found dead early Thursday in a Southwest Philadelphia house where the inside temperature had dropped to 10 degrees, and the cold evidently contributed to her death, Lt. John Walker of Southwest Detectives said. With temperatures fighting to get out of the teens, homeless-services providers were working hard to protect the region's most vulnerable residents from bone-chilling cold.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As shivering but curious passersby stopped to watch, holding up scarves to shield their faces from below-freezing winds, Kevin Gregory lifted a 10-pound Eagles helmet made of ice onto a clear, frozen podium. "Couldn't have asked for better weather - except for the sun," said Gregory, founder of Ice Concepts and the Eagles' unofficial go-to ice sculptor, on the 15-degree morning Friday. Gregory, 45, has been carving ice since 1994, most of that time with his business partner, Antonio Young.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
Americo DiSantis talks about what makes a great meal in the Arctic and what's most important to take there with you. www.inquirer.com/disantis
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters Sunday in Washington, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the tar-sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers, and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Critical ice in the Arctic Ocean melted to record low levels this sweltering summer and that can make weather more extreme far away from the poles, scientists say. The National Snow and Ice Data Center reported Monday that the extent of Arctic sea ice shrank to 1.58 million square miles and is likely to melt more in the coming weeks. That breaks the old record of 1.61 million square miles set in 2007. The North Pole region is an ocean that mostly is crusted at the top with ice. In the winter, the frozen saltwater surface usually extends about 6 million square miles, shrinking in summer and growing back in the fall.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | Reviewed by Sandy Bauers
Moonbird A Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 By Phillip Hoose Farrar Straus Giroux. 160 pp. $21.99   It was Feb. 20, 1995. The bird-banding team had caught so many birds that they ran out of the usual colored bands. Someone found black plastic in one of the trucks, and they fitted strips of it around the legs of the final birds, including one very special bird - a small shorebird that probably has become one of the most iconic birds known.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Roger T. Rufe
With the government on the brink of allowing the oil industry to explore in America's remote Arctic Ocean this summer, it is worth revisiting some of the lessons learned from the biggest oil spill in the nation's history, the Deepwater Horizon disaster.   Stopping that spill took three months, even though it occurred in the relatively calm waters of the Gulf of Mexico near Coast Guard stations, cleanup equipment, and abundant shoreside support. Subsequently, I was asked to chair a panel of federal, state, industry, and environmental experts to review our nation's response.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
It's a long and twisty trail that leads from Alexander the Great to Larry the Cable Guy, but the History Channel would gladly travel it again. The cable outlet launched on New Year's Day in 1995 with lofty aspirations befitting its name. It offered a library of documentaries about everything from the Precambrian Era to the Crusades to the Korean War. Ladies and gentlemen, we have discovered the cure for insomnia. The subject matter was too dry for TV's heightened narrative style.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Lisa Liddane, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. - As with most veteran filmmakers and directors, Greg MacGillivray's imagination was lush with visions of how his new project might look. What he didn't picture when he started the new IMAX documentary To the Arctic was just how personal that project would get. For one thing, every member of his family of four - his wife Barbara, son Shaun, and daughter Meghan - participated behind the scenes. Eight years ago, Greg and Barbara cofounded the MacGillivray Freeman Films Educational Foundation, which aims to contribute to the conservation of natural and cultural resources through giant-screen films and companion educational programming.
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