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NEWS
March 10, 2015
LOWER MERION After 10 months of a misnomer, Lower Merion is fixing the "Ardmore" sign on Anderson Avenue. The sign has read "Ar_more" since May, when a truck hit the bridge that carries SEPTA trains over Anderson Avenue. The 'D' was left dangling, and the township took it down for safety reasons. The bridge clearance is 10.5 feet, and this wasn't the first time a tall vehicle has topped out. The work was scheduled to be done overnight Thursday but has been delayed by weather.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
ARDMORE The latest chapter in a decadelong effort to boost downtown Ardmore and renovate its train station unfolded Wednesday night in the Lower Merion Township administration building as commissioners reviewed part of a controversial residential and retail project. During a contentious meeting at which commissioners spoke testily to one another and township staff, Building and Planning Committee members spent about three hours discussing whether to recommend approval of a preliminary land-development plan from Dranoff Properties whose result would be a new building with 121 apartments, ground-level retail space, and parking.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
ARDMORE Like a railroad car chugging laboriously toward its destination, the downtown Ardmore revitalization and train station project had a big obstacle thrown in its path this week. The obstacle is $12 million in funding the state said it will cut. Lower Merion Township officials received a letter Monday that says Gov. Corbett plans to reduce a pledged $15.5 million grant from the state's Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program to $3.5 million. The grant is for the project to revitalize the Ardmore station and build a residential and commercial development nearby.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months after Gov. Corbett pulled back $12 million in state funding for residential and commercial development meant to boost downtown Ardmore, the plan's fate remains muddled. Friends of the $50-million-plus project by developer Carl Dranoff are pressing for the money to be restored; critics want it blocked. "There are strong feelings from a number of different entities," Corbett spokesman Jay Pagni said Friday. "The governor wants all of that information. Once that flow of information stops, he'll make a decision.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial redevelopment in downtown Ardmore is back on track after the state restored $10.5 million in grants that were previously pulled from the project. Carl Dranoff, president of Dranoff Properties, said the funding was critical for a high-rise apartment and retail complex across from the Ardmore train station. "Up until Friday, we didn't have a project," he said. "We kept plowing ahead during the whole 2014, advancing our plans and approvals on the hope that we would be ready to begin should we receive the grant.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Stephanie Farr and Daily News Staff Writer
AT 10 P.M. Sunday, the 10-year-old boy and his father should have been sharing a bedtime story or late-night snack. Instead, they shared a horrific experience neither is soon to forget.   According to township officials, the boy stabbed his 32-year-old father in the neck at the Ardmore apartment they share. The man was rushed by ambulance to Paoli Memorial Hospital, where he was recovering Monday. Meanwhile, his son was in the custody of family members, according to Thomas Walsh, spokesman for Lower Merion Township.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nine African American students from Ardmore are petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court, asking for a review of lower-court findings in their bias case against the Lower Merion School District. The students' attorney, David G.C. Arnold, filed notice of appeal Tuesday, in effect asking the nation's high court to reexamine a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in the redistricting case. The Third Circuit found on Dec. 15 that a 2009 plan to assign the students to Harriton High School against their will did not violate their constitutional rights.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine African American students from Ardmore are petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court, asking for a review of lower court findings in their bias case against the Lower Merion School District. The student's attorney, David G.C. Arnold, filed notice of appeal this morning, in effect asking the nation's high court to reexamine a ruling by the Third Circuit of Appeals in the controversial redistricting case. The Third Circuit Court found on Dec. 15, that a 2009 plan to assign the students to Harriton High School against their will did not violate their constitutional rights.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Franny and Jerry Weinstein were struggling to make a living selling auto parts during the great gas crisis of 1979 when the Nike swoosh changed everything. The couple had tried peddling a few close-out-brand athletic shoes to help shore up their bottom line, and before long, the Weinsteins' Automotive City gave way to a sneaker nation. "Nike and Adidas were exploding the whole industry," Franny Weinstein, 65, said. "Our sneakers starting doing better than the auto parts. " Now, the Weinsteins have made another momentous business decision, not driven by an international oil embargo, but by local competition and the Internet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
While America's alt-rock scene lumbered through its wild '90s - the period of Beck's Odelay , the Beastie Boys' Ill Communication , Soundgarden's Superunknown , and Ice-T's Body Count - a nice Philly band, holed up at Manayunk's Grape Street Pub and Old City's Tin Angel, moved tiny mountains with a mellow brand of pop: June Rich. Twenty years after its first album, and 17 years since the band broke up, June Rich has reunited, re-releasing its debut disc with a new song ("Who I Am")
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
You can call it power-bluegrass or country soul, but whatever you call it, Nashville's SteelDrivers have bushels of it, as they righteously displayed Thursday night at the Ardmore Music Hall, with supporting act Rootsology in tow. Led by Music City session cats Tammy Rogers (a fiddler known for gigs with Patty Loveless), bassist Mike Fleming (Holly Dunn), mandolinist Brent Truitt (Dolly Parton), and banjo player Richard Bailey (George Jones), the now-decade-old outfit found its groove when it brought on country-singing guitarist Gary Nichols.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
You can take the purported extraterrestrial origins of the Sun Ra Arkestra as mere showmanship, or as sci-fi social commentary. But watching bandleader Marshall Allen on Thursday at the Ardmore Music Hall - eliciting trademark squawks and grunts from his alto saxophone and conducting the cacophony of the 14-piece band for more than two hours just days before his 91st birthday - you could start to believe that there is something not quite human about...
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
  Ardmore isn't New Orleans, and quiet Lancaster Avenue is surely not Bourbon Street. But on Sunday, there were some sweaty goings-on at Ardmore Music Hall with zydeco accordion king C.J. Chenier & the Red-Hot Louisiana Band and supporting act Philly Gumbo. In silver brocade and sparkly shoes, Chenier, son of zydeco god Clifton Chenier, walked onstage with the heritage of Louisiana Creole funk on his shoulders. Also on his shoulders was a Baldoni accordion as opulent as his outfit.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Between Thursday and July 5, the remaining original members of the Grateful Dead - Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, and Bob Weir - will play what they're calling their last shows together. On May 14 at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Md., the original Dead men will play solo sets as part of "Dear Jerry," a tribute to band cofounder, guitarist, and spirit guide Jerry Garcia (who died Aug. 9, 1995), with dozens of like-minded artists. The (supposedly) terminal concert series, titled "Fare Thee Well," is June 27 and 28 in Santa Clara, Calif., and July 3 and 5 in Chicago.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suburban Square in Ardmore will lose its Macy's store in January, as part of the retailer's strategy to close stores nationwide in order to cater to the growing number of online shoppers, experts said. The Ardmore center and the location of the Macy's have historical significance. Suburban Square opened in 1928 as one of the first shopping centers in the United States, and likewise had one of the first department-store anchors when Strawbridge & Clothier opened there two years later.
NEWS
March 10, 2015
LOWER MERION After 10 months of a misnomer, Lower Merion is fixing the "Ardmore" sign on Anderson Avenue. The sign has read "Ar_more" since May, when a truck hit the bridge that carries SEPTA trains over Anderson Avenue. The 'D' was left dangling, and the township took it down for safety reasons. The bridge clearance is 10.5 feet, and this wasn't the first time a tall vehicle has topped out. The work was scheduled to be done overnight Thursday but has been delayed by weather.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas J. Carbine, 96, of Ardmore, a decorated World War II pilot who later became president of an enameling company and the father of 12 children, died Sunday, Jan. 11, of an intestinal ailment at ManorCare King of Prussia. Mr. Carbine was president of the Quaker City Japanning & Enameling Co., a metal finishing firm at Third Street and Girard Avenue. He sold the building and gradually wound down the firm's operations a while ago. Born in Narberth, Mr. Carbine graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School and earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from Villanova University.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first Saturday of the new year, and Doug Seegers was eating breakfast at a McDonald's in West Nashville before heading out to his steadiest gig - playing in front of the local Goodwill store. "Whether I'm playing a big show somewhere or whether I'm playing out on the street for little kids walking by, I get the same kind of joy," Seegers says over the phone. "I'm just looking to play my guitar and spread my music to whoever is around at the time. " Seegers, who plays Sunday at the Ardmore Music Hall, may still enjoy busking, but life certainly has changed over the last year for the 63-year-old country artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title of Paul Thorn's new album comes from something he heard while growing up in Tupelo, Miss., where he still lives. " 'Too blessed to be stressed' - I got that phrase from an old black woman I used to go to church with, Sister Johnson," Thorn, 50, recalls from a tour stop in Connecticut. "One morning when I was a kid, I asked her how she was doing, and she said, 'Oh, I'm too blessed to be stressed.' "That phrase stuck in my head. All the songs on this record were intentionally put together to make the listener feel good.
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