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Argument

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NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Robert Adams, a member of Warrington's Parks and Recreation Board, says that Warrington Supervisor Joseph Bonargo pushed him several times during a heated argument Saturday morning at the Barness baseball fields. Adams has filed a criminal complaint against Bonargo with District Justice Oliver A. Groman because Bonargo's brother, John Bonargo, is the police chief in Warrington. Groman's court clerk confirmed that Adams had filed a complaint against Bonargo, but refused to release the complaint until the District Attorney's Office reviews it and decides whether to press charges.
NEWS
February 20, 2001
You are to be congratulated on your article on guns (Feb. 13) - an excellent puff piece, probably written by Police Commissioner John Timoney and his sidekicks. It lacked any pretense of fairness. In the chart, "Armed and Dangerous," you list the number of guns used in major crimes in this city during 1999, but nowhere is there a breakdown of lawful gun permit holders vs. non-permit holders. It is obvious that the omission is intentional, so as to make it appear that all those crimes were committed by permit holders.
NEWS
April 29, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A barrage of violence Sunday that left five dead and seven wounded has left a top city police official puzzled. Most of the mayhem began over what William Blackburn, chief inspector of detectives, called "senseless argument. " "Arguments are still the dominant motive," he said in a news conference yesterday, "not just for the homicides, but for the shootings. " Asked to elaborate about violence on recent weekends, Blackburn said, "I'm not going to blame weather conditions.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | By Al Baker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The prosecutor compared the alleged rapist to the little man behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz. "Damon Thornton says, 'Pay no attention to the man behind the evidence,' " Assistant Gloucester County Prosecutor Keith Warburton told the jury in his closing argument yesterday. "But the evidence, ladies and gentlemen, is the yellow-brick road that leads to him. " Thornton, 30, who is serving as his own attorney, called the state's case a "bunch of bull" and "a conspiracy" in his closing argument before Superior Court Judge Donald Smith Jr. The jurors - who occasionally giggled and yawned on the seventh day of the trial - deliberated for a half-hour before recessing until 9 a.m. today.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team from Overbrook High School won the Pennsylvania Bar Association's Mock Trial Competition yesterday. Overbrook, which also captured the championship in 1997 and 2004, acted as the defense in the final round in Harrisburg, with runner-up Greensburg Salem High School of Westmoreland County as the prosecution. Overbrook teacher Philip Beauchemin coaches the team of seniors Sarah Brown, Kiersten Harris-Andrews, Jamal Hill, Cedric Ingram Jr., Jennifer Josiaste, Lakyra Stokes, Tamika Webb and Ian Wiley.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
By Chris Kelly As a young beat reporter, I covered a Pennsylvania school board that included a member who was opposed to spending money on any educational advance newer than the blackboard. He was especially disdainful of computers, which he characterized as expensive toys that promoted laziness, liberalism, and pornography. "When I was in school, we didn't have no damned computers," he once said at a public meeting. "We had to use our noodle. " It wasn't clear if there was just the one noodle for the whole school, or if each kid got one. What was clear is that this dolt had no business visiting a school district, let alone running one. His statement is a classic example of the "straw man" fallacy, in which a debater creates a caricature of his opponent's argument and attacks it. This way, the dolt was able to sidestep the real problem, which was that the district had fallen behind its peers in acquiring computers.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men were shot and seriously wounded by one of the owners of Homer's Diner during an argument outside the 24-hour restaurant on the Collingswood Circle shortly before midnight Friday, police said yesterday. Collingswood police said Bret Nigro, 23, of Argyle Avenue, Washington Township, was shot in the right back and right shoulder and was listed in critical condition at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center after surgery. William Palmer, 29, of Wedgewood Drive, also in Washington Township, was shot once in the abdomen and was listed in serious condition at Cooper.
NEWS
December 1, 1996
Government can't attempt to maintain a status quo simply by spending money simply to maintain areas that are no longer competitive. . . . People, on their own, are going to where they think the greater opportunities are. . . . There's no question in my mind, the cities were overpopulated by the 1950s. - Thacher Longstreth Dec. 29, 1980, as president of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | By John Way Jennings and Ed Engel, FOR THE INQUIRER
A 30-year-old Hammonton man was fatally stabbed early yesterday morningafter an argument with several men on the parking lot of a tavern. Detective Capt. Brian Valerio of the Winslow Police Department said the victim, Joseph TomasinoJr., was stabbed several times about 11:15 p.m. in the parking lot of the Rustic Tavern on White Horse Pike in the Elm section of the township. No suspects have been charged in the fatal stabbing. Following the stabbing, Tomasino was rushed by ambulance to the William B. Kessler Hospital in Hammonton then transferred by helicopter to the Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center trauma unit.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 24-year-old Hunting Park man was killed last night after an argument that police said began as trash talk at an organized basketball game at Temple University's McGonigle Hall was taken outside and settled with a single gunshot. A police officer at the scene said that about 8:50 p.m., a group of people left the game to continue their argument outside and ended up in a little plaza between two buildings on Broad Street south of McGonigle Hall. There, one of the participants pulled out a gun and shot once, striking Dwight Bates of the 3900 block of Ninth Street in the chest, Homicide investigators said.
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NEWS
August 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The embattled but entrenched Pennsylvania politician, proclaiming his or her innocence while clinging to the public payroll, is not just an individual but a species. Consider that the commonwealth has in recent weeks been drearily occupied by the spectacle of not one but two prominent officeholders - Attorney General Kathleen Kane and longtime Congressman Chaka Fattah - facing grave charges while scrambling to avoid their political graves. This increasingly familiar ritual features a pattern of predictable elements, including: The ad hominem: In a five-page letter released on the eve of his arraignment last week, Fattah attacked Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Gray as dogging him, Javert-like, out of an acute aversion to pork-barrel politics and perhaps Fattah himself.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
To prosecutors, it's a case of a cop caught lying on the witness stand when a defense lawyer confronted him with a video of his warrantless search of a drug suspect's car. To the lawyer for former Philadelphia Police Officer Steven Lupo, it's a case about the practicalities of real-world policing and a good cop with a faulty memory. "You'll find that ultimately, his testimony and the video don't add up," Assistant District Attorney Sybil Scott-Murphy told the Common Pleas Court jury Friday in her opening statement.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit heard arguments Thursday that could clear the way for Pennsylvania counties to reap tens of millions of dollars from the banking industry's mortgage-registry system. A federal judge in Philadelphia ruled last June that the registry, known as MERS, used its members-only database to illegally circumvent county recorders' offices. As a result, Judge J. Curtis Joyner wrote, counties lost tens of millions of dollars in recording fees, the accuracy of public records was compromised, and home loans were sold time and again without the knowledge of homeowners or county recorders.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
ONE THING Michael Vessels can't get out of his mind, a prosecutor told a jury yesterday, is the face of the gunman who stood over him, shot him execution-style, and told him, "You won't talk no more. " Vessels, a minister who witnessed a crime on the North Philly block where he lived, was shot five times on Sept. 26, 2011, so he wouldn't testify in court, Assistant District Attorney Douglas Rhoads said in his closing argument at the trial of Shaheed Williams, 23, and Aki Jones, 39. Williams, nicknamed "Pizza," is accused of shooting Vessels.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A barrage of shots in Point Breeze on Saturday afternoon left one man dead and police searching for the gunman. Police had not released the name of the 43-year-old victim by Saturday night, but they said he was shot multiple times about 2 p.m. on the 2300 block of Oakford Street. He was taken to Presbyterian Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 2:19, police said. The killing happened directly outside the home of Henrietta Graham, who said she heard the victim arguing with someone.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
DEFENSE ATTORNEYS yesterday lauded the six former narcotics cops on trial, appealed to jurors' emotions, derided the government's witnesses and blamed the feds for their investigation. Jimmy Binns, attorney for defendant Michael Spicer, called his client and the other five former cops "innocent heroes," "the best of the best" in the police department, men "who stand up and carry the flag and uphold the oath that they took," and said in his closing argument that "they will be children of God. " Binns told jurors that when Spicer took the witness stand in the trial, he misspoke when he said he lived for his police job. "He lives for her," Binns said, pointing to Spicer's wife, Donna, who was sitting in the back row of the courtroom.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
SIX FORMER narcotics officers on trial "believed that because they wore a badge, their crimes would never see the light of day," a prosecutor told a jury in her closing argument yesterday. "Quite frankly, sadly, if it were only one accuser, their crimes probably would not be exposed," Assistant U.S. Attorney Maureen McCartney said. "But over the course of this trial, you have heard from 19 different people. And they're essentially saying the same things. " Eighteen of the 19 suspected or admitted drug dealers contended that the cops robbed them of cash, drugs or personal items, and in some cases roughed them up. The 19th alleged victim, Dontay Murphy, alleged that Officer Thomas Liciardello hit him in the head with the back of a gun, bloodying Murphy's head, after Liciardello chased him on foot.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether Msgr. William J. Lynn may remain on house arrest or must return to prison to complete his three- to six-year term for child endangerment will be heard Thursday by a Philadelphia judge. The hearing was set by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina after the District Attorney's Office moved to have the Catholic cleric's bail revoked when the state Supreme Court reinstated Lynn's conviction Monday. Lynn, 64, was convicted following a landmark 13-week trial in 2012 involving his role supervising priests accused of sexually abusing children.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over three months, Claire Risoldi's jewelry collection - and its insurance policy - ballooned from a couple of pieces worth $100,000 to 52 items worth about $11 million. Weeks later, the Risoldi family's Bucks County mansion caught fire for the third time in three years. The collection disappeared, and Risoldi allegedly claimed that firefighters were to blame. Testifying for the second day in a Bucks County courtroom on Tuesday, insurance adjuster James O'Keefe noted the insurance policy's rapid increase and said insurer AIG would eventually deny the $11 million claim under the belief it was fraudulent.
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