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Argument

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NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Robert Adams, a member of Warrington's Parks and Recreation Board, says that Warrington Supervisor Joseph Bonargo pushed him several times during a heated argument Saturday morning at the Barness baseball fields. Adams has filed a criminal complaint against Bonargo with District Justice Oliver A. Groman because Bonargo's brother, John Bonargo, is the police chief in Warrington. Groman's court clerk confirmed that Adams had filed a complaint against Bonargo, but refused to release the complaint until the District Attorney's Office reviews it and decides whether to press charges.
NEWS
February 20, 2001
You are to be congratulated on your article on guns (Feb. 13) - an excellent puff piece, probably written by Police Commissioner John Timoney and his sidekicks. It lacked any pretense of fairness. In the chart, "Armed and Dangerous," you list the number of guns used in major crimes in this city during 1999, but nowhere is there a breakdown of lawful gun permit holders vs. non-permit holders. It is obvious that the omission is intentional, so as to make it appear that all those crimes were committed by permit holders.
NEWS
April 29, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A barrage of violence Sunday that left five dead and seven wounded has left a top city police official puzzled. Most of the mayhem began over what William Blackburn, chief inspector of detectives, called "senseless argument. " "Arguments are still the dominant motive," he said in a news conference yesterday, "not just for the homicides, but for the shootings. " Asked to elaborate about violence on recent weekends, Blackburn said, "I'm not going to blame weather conditions.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | By Al Baker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The prosecutor compared the alleged rapist to the little man behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz. "Damon Thornton says, 'Pay no attention to the man behind the evidence,' " Assistant Gloucester County Prosecutor Keith Warburton told the jury in his closing argument yesterday. "But the evidence, ladies and gentlemen, is the yellow-brick road that leads to him. " Thornton, 30, who is serving as his own attorney, called the state's case a "bunch of bull" and "a conspiracy" in his closing argument before Superior Court Judge Donald Smith Jr. The jurors - who occasionally giggled and yawned on the seventh day of the trial - deliberated for a half-hour before recessing until 9 a.m. today.
NEWS
March 30, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team from Overbrook High School won the Pennsylvania Bar Association's Mock Trial Competition yesterday. Overbrook, which also captured the championship in 1997 and 2004, acted as the defense in the final round in Harrisburg, with runner-up Greensburg Salem High School of Westmoreland County as the prosecution. Overbrook teacher Philip Beauchemin coaches the team of seniors Sarah Brown, Kiersten Harris-Andrews, Jamal Hill, Cedric Ingram Jr., Jennifer Josiaste, Lakyra Stokes, Tamika Webb and Ian Wiley.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
By Chris Kelly As a young beat reporter, I covered a Pennsylvania school board that included a member who was opposed to spending money on any educational advance newer than the blackboard. He was especially disdainful of computers, which he characterized as expensive toys that promoted laziness, liberalism, and pornography. "When I was in school, we didn't have no damned computers," he once said at a public meeting. "We had to use our noodle. " It wasn't clear if there was just the one noodle for the whole school, or if each kid got one. What was clear is that this dolt had no business visiting a school district, let alone running one. His statement is a classic example of the "straw man" fallacy, in which a debater creates a caricature of his opponent's argument and attacks it. This way, the dolt was able to sidestep the real problem, which was that the district had fallen behind its peers in acquiring computers.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men were shot and seriously wounded by one of the owners of Homer's Diner during an argument outside the 24-hour restaurant on the Collingswood Circle shortly before midnight Friday, police said yesterday. Collingswood police said Bret Nigro, 23, of Argyle Avenue, Washington Township, was shot in the right back and right shoulder and was listed in critical condition at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center after surgery. William Palmer, 29, of Wedgewood Drive, also in Washington Township, was shot once in the abdomen and was listed in serious condition at Cooper.
NEWS
December 1, 1996
Government can't attempt to maintain a status quo simply by spending money simply to maintain areas that are no longer competitive. . . . People, on their own, are going to where they think the greater opportunities are. . . . There's no question in my mind, the cities were overpopulated by the 1950s. - Thacher Longstreth Dec. 29, 1980, as president of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | By John Way Jennings and Ed Engel, FOR THE INQUIRER
A 30-year-old Hammonton man was fatally stabbed early yesterday morningafter an argument with several men on the parking lot of a tavern. Detective Capt. Brian Valerio of the Winslow Police Department said the victim, Joseph TomasinoJr., was stabbed several times about 11:15 p.m. in the parking lot of the Rustic Tavern on White Horse Pike in the Elm section of the township. No suspects have been charged in the fatal stabbing. Following the stabbing, Tomasino was rushed by ambulance to the William B. Kessler Hospital in Hammonton then transferred by helicopter to the Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center trauma unit.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 24-year-old Hunting Park man was killed last night after an argument that police said began as trash talk at an organized basketball game at Temple University's McGonigle Hall was taken outside and settled with a single gunshot. A police officer at the scene said that about 8:50 p.m., a group of people left the game to continue their argument outside and ended up in a little plaza between two buildings on Broad Street south of McGonigle Hall. There, one of the participants pulled out a gun and shot once, striking Dwight Bates of the 3900 block of Ninth Street in the chest, Homicide investigators said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2016
By Faith Whittlesey There is an argument being widely asserted today that is plainly intellectually dishonest. In the past, Washington politicians, partisan commentators, and foreign policy elites have employed this argument to discredit insurgent candidacies - often accompanied by a studied, sad-eyed condescension and no small amount of eye-rolling. It happened with Ronald Reagan, and it appears to be happening now with Donald Trump. The argument goes like this: Trump is to be dismissed out of hand as "unqualified" to formulate U.S. foreign policy positions and cannot be trusted to conduct U.S. foreign policy because he has "no experience" and has the "wrong temperament.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
As an immigrant, Muibat Williamson has firm ideas about what the United States and its citizens should be about. So when a SEPTA police officer cut in line on Christmas 2013 as she waited in the Dunkin' Donuts shop in Suburban Station and then, according to her, stepped on her foot as he left, Williamson was not about to let it rest. "I said, 'Excuse me, you stepped on me. Aren't you going to apologize?' " Williamson told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday. SEPTA Officer Douglas Ioven said no, he didn't step on her foot, and wouldn't apologize.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Schools on Trial How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice By Nikhil Goyal. Doubleday. 309 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler At age 20, Nikhil Goyal is a self-proclaimed "bug in the system. " A critic of compulsory schooling, Goyal is now an undergraduate at Goddard College and a journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times and the Nation, and on MSNBC and Fox. In Schools on Trial , Goyal blasts schools as enemies of "creativity, curiosity and zeal" whose primary purpose is controlling and commanding children.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Not even Vice President Biden, a 36-year Senate veteran and former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, would be afforded the courtesy of a Senate interview, much less a Judiciary Committee hearing, should President Obama nominate him to fill the seat left vacant by the passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Or so I was recently told by Utah's Sen. Orrin Hatch, one of the 11 Republicans on the committee who signed a letter saying they will "withhold consent on any nominee to the Supreme Court submitted by this president to fill Justice Scalia's vacancy.
NEWS
February 6, 2016
A 61-year-old man was fatally stabbed during an argument Thursday night in the city's Ogontz section, police said. Just before 7:45 p.m. inside a residence in the 5600 block of North 15th Street, the man was hanging out with friends when he got into an argument with his assailant, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. The victim, who lived across the street, was stabbed in the head, neck, and chest. Officers took him to Einstein Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 8:04 p.m. Small said a suspect had been identified and was being sought.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
A Montgomery County judge on Friday said he would limit a Feb. 2 hearing to arguments by Bill Cosby's lawyers that the District Attorney's Office violated a 2005 non-prosecution agreement when it charged the entertainer with sexual assault last month. With his one-paragraph order, Judge Steven T. O'Neill turned aside a request by District Attorney Kevin Steele for the case to proceed first with a preliminary evidentiary hearing. O'Neill wrote that he would not hear arguments on other matters raised by Cosby's defense, limiting the hearing to the issue that has become a pivotal question in the case.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
Just in time for the 2016 election, the Roberts Supreme Court has found yet another way to stack the deck in favor of the rich. By all appearances at Monday's argument, the five Republican-appointed justices are ready to upend a 40-year precedent guiding labor relations in favor of a new approach that will deplete public-sector unions' finances and reduce their political clout. The case, from California, involves arcane issues of "agency fees" and member opt-outs, but make no mistake: This is about campaign finance, and, in particular, propping up the Republican Party.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Staff Writer
A CONVICTED murderer who came very close to taking another life this weekend is now on the run, according to police, and authorities are seeking the public's help in tracking him down. About 9:15 p.m. Saturday, Rashon Solice, 37, of Philadelphia, allegedly went to a home on Copley Road near Long Lane in Upper Darby looking for a woman named "Nicole. " When the male resident of the home, who had only met Solice on one prior occasion, said he did not know Nicole's whereabouts, an argument ensued, according to Upper Darby police Superintendent Michael Chitwood.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Emily Babay and Dylan Purcell, STAFF WRITERS
A man was in police custody Monday after a triple shooting that left one man dead and two wounded in East Mount Airy. Initial reports said the men were watching the Eagles' Sunday night football game on TV when an argument erupted. Police could not confirm that immediately. They said a suspect was in custody by Monday afternoon but had not yet been charged. Officers were called to the 8300 block of Gilbert Street at 12:04 a.m. Monday after an argument led to gunfire in a one-car garage that had been turned into a TV room, officials said.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Warren Brown, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST
Rapid technological progress, accompanied by the increasing standardization of what once was sold as costly optional equipment, is upsetting the notion of traditional automotive luxury. I've written this before - much to the chagrin of many in the car industry, particularly executives who cling to the eroding but still profitable idea that "luxury" is reserved for those truly wealthy enough to afford it, or aspirant buyers willing to incur enormous debt to acquire it. I am hereby restating my argument and offering as proof Exhibit A - the 2016 Kia Optima SX Limited sedan.
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