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Arizona Law

NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, closely divided along ideological lines, made it harder for states and cities to use public funding of campaigns to limit the effect of private money on elections. In a 5-4 decision, the justices struck down an Arizona law offering extra "matching funds" to candidates who opted to accept only public funds and who faced a free-spending opponent who relied on personal money. The matching funds aimed to make sure the publicly funded candidates could keep pace with their opponents.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday abo**ut Arizona's attempt to purge itself of all undocumented immigrants — and even those who "look" illegal — and the court's questions suggest that it may support the controversial law that the Grand Canyon State adopted in 2010. Arizona's SB 1070 — the "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act"— relies on state and local law enforcement to get rid of illegal immigrants. The most controversial provisions require police and other law-enforcement officials to ask about the immigration status of anyone they stop, authorizes local police to make an arrest without a warrant of any person they believe is removable from the United States, makes it a misdemeanor to fail to carry proper immigration documents and makes it a crime for undocumented immigrants to look for work.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Questions and comments made by several justices during last week's oral arguments suggested the Supreme Court might validate that portion of a controversial Arizona law that would allow local police to question persons suspected of other crimes about their immigration status. The court wouldn't consider the likelihood that such questioning might violate the questioned person's civil rights because that is the subject of separate litigation. The justices are limited to ruling on the constitutionality of specific issues brought before the high court, so they also didn't comment on the morality of the Arizona law and others like it either proposed or enacted in other states.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Michael Doyle, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Supreme Court justices sounded sympathetic Wednesday to Arizona's efforts to crack down on illegal immigrants, while raising some questions about the potential consequences for individuals and for national policy. In an election-year case that inspired chanting demonstrators outside and maneuvering politicians across Capitol Hill, multiple justices hinted or declared outright that Arizona can enforce its own border-control measures. Overall, the tenor of the unusually long argument tilted in favor of the state.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Brian Skoloff and Josh Hoffner, Associated Press
PHOENIX - The judge in the Jodi Arias murder trial declared a mistrial in the penalty phase Thursday after the jury reported for a second time that it was deadlocked on whether to sentence her to life in prison or death for killing her boyfriend in 2008. The judge scheduled a retrial for July 18. A new panel likely will be seated to try again to reach a decision on a sentence - unless the prosecutor agrees to a life sentence. The jurors began deliberating Tuesday and first reported they had failed agree the next day. The judge instructed them to keep trying.
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
Liberalism under siege is an ugly sight. Just yesterday, it was all hope and change and returning power to the people. But the people have proved so disappointing. Their recalcitrance has, in only 19 months, turned the predicted 40-year liberal ascendancy (James Carville) into a full retreat. Ah, the people - the little people, the small-town people, the "bitter" people, as Barack Obama, in an unguarded moment, once memorably called them - clinging "to guns or religion or" - this is less remembered - "antipathy toward people who aren't like them.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Jacques Billeaud, Associated Press
PHOENIX - A federal judge blocked police in Arizona from enforcing a section of the state's 2010 immigration enforcement law that prohibited people from blocking traffic when they seek or offer day-labor services on streets. U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton ruled Wednesday that groups seeking to overturn the law would likely prevail in their claim that the day-labor rules violate the First Amendment. She rejected arguments by the state that the rules were needed for traffic safety and pointed out that the law, also known as SB1070, says its purpose is to make attrition through enforcement the immigration policy of state and local government agencies.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday gave the Northeastern Pennsylvania city of Hazleton another chance to resurrect its 2006 ordinance cracking down on illegal immigrants. The closely watched local law would penalize landlords who rented to illegal immigrants, and employers who hired them. It was immediately challenged by Hispanic and other groups, and blocked in 2007 by a federal district court. Last year, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia affirmed the lower court's ruling.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
RE KERITH Gabriel's "High and Inside" column of June 2: I have a plan for all the players on the Miami Heat, Phoenix Suns, Florida Marlins, New York Mets and anyone else who wants to jump on the bandwagon to oppose the Arizona law protecting our citizens and our border. These players make millions of dollars a year. My suggestion: Start a fund to support all of these people who've entered our country illegally, and who are demanding rights they're not entitled to. This would take a big burden off the taxpayers.
SPORTS
September 8, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
An Arizona jury found Tampa Bay tight end Jerramy Stevens guilty yesterday of driving under the influence of alcohol. Stevens, 27, a former Seattle top pick, was arrested in March after police stopped his car in downtown Scottsdale. Police said Stevens smelled of alcohol, had bloodshot eyes and slurred speech. Seattle let him become a free agent shortly afterward. Stevens went to trial on three DUI charges stemming from the March incident. Stevens faces a jail sentence of at least 30 days under an Arizona law for "extreme" intoxication, where a driver has a blood alcohol content of .15 percent or higher.
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