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NEWS
June 8, 2010
By Steve Hallock Arizona's racist and probably unconstitutional anti-immigration law has admirers in Pennsylvania. With bipartisan backing from State Reps. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler), Harry Readshaw (D., Allegheny), and others, House Bill 2479 would ape Arizona's controversial immigration law by empowering local and state police officers to arrest those who can't show that they're in the country legally. The bill would direct officers "to attempt to verify the immigration status of suspected illegal aliens.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Jacques Billeaud, Associated Press
PHOENIX - Opponents of Arizona's hard-line immigration enforcement law launched a new effort Tuesday aimed at thwarting a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that will allow police to enforce the so-called "show me your papers" provision. A coalition of civil rights groups, religious leaders, and business organizations filed a new request seeking a court order that would prevent authorities from enforcing a rule that requires police to check the immigration status of people they stop for other reasons.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
NEARLY 500 Pennsylvania inmates who were sentenced to life without parole while they were juveniles may get another chance for freedom thanks to Monday's Supreme Court decision that ruled such sentences are unconstitutional. Following a 2005 decision that outlawed the death penalty for juveniles, and a 2010 decision that outlawed life without parole for juvenile nonhomicide offenders, this decision outlaws mandatory-life-without-parole sentences for homicide offenders. The Supreme Court is not excusing young people who commit murder — or juveniles who were sentenced not because they murdered but because they were with someone who did — and neither are we. But the court decision is eloquent in recognizing that "youth is more than a chronological fact," but a time of immaturity, irresponsibility, "impetuousness and recklessness.
NEWS
May 7, 2010 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia City Council showed off its internal differences Thursday in skirmishes over budget cuts and immigration. Council's most conservative Democrat, Joan Krajewski, joined Republicans Jack Kelly and Brian J. O'Neill in a rare dissent to two Council resolutions opposing the stringent immigration policy adopted in Arizona and being considered in Pennsylvania. Councilwoman Maria Qui?ones S?nchez proposed the nonbinding resolutions, which both passed, 14-3. One urges the Nutter administration to divest any business from Arizona and encourages businesses to reconsider conventions there.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
THE GAS TANK'S empty, moths are eating the upholstery, the wheels are falling off the bus, but in its wisdom and grace, City Council last week passed, 14-3, a feel-good, factually bad anti-Arizona resolution. It was like a zoo chimp throwing poop at those outside the bars. Council condemned Arizona's anti- illegal -immigrant bill, SB 1070, and called for an economic boycott. The resolution was sponsored by Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez, who said she'd talk with me about this on Friday, then didn't.
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
Liberalism under siege is an ugly sight. Just yesterday, it was all hope and change and returning power to the people. But the people have proved so disappointing. Their recalcitrance has, in only 19 months, turned the predicted 40-year liberal ascendancy (James Carville) into a full retreat. Ah, the people - the little people, the small-town people, the "bitter" people, as Barack Obama, in an unguarded moment, once memorably called them - clinging "to guns or religion or" - this is less remembered - "antipathy toward people who aren't like them.
NEWS
June 29, 2010 | By Arlen Specter
Solicitor General Elena Kagan has given the Senate Judiciary Committee a welcome opportunity to make this week's hearings on her Supreme Court nomination a substantive discussion of legal issues and judicial philosophy - and a departure from the charade they have become in recent years. Kagan has opened the door to such a discussion with her own words. In a 1995 Harvard Law Review article, she called modern confirmation hearings a "farce" notable for their "vacuity," in which "senators do not insist that any nominee reveal what kind of Justice she would make, by disclosing her views on important legal issues.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Justice Department lawsuit against Arizona's new immigration law is an Obama administration "effort to shore up the Hispanic vote in future elections," Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) told 200 demonstrators rallying in favor of the law in South Philadelphia on Wednesday. Speaking by telephone to Dom Giordano of the "Big Talker 1210 AM" radio program broadcasting from the sidewalk at Geno's Steaks, McCain said "people in Arizona feel a little bit under assault" because opponents of the law have called for boycotts of the state.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Michael Doyle, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld an Arizona law that severely penalizes businesses that knowingly hire illegal immigrants. In a ruling likely to embolden Congress and other states, the court declared that Arizona's law fits comfortably within the state's powers. "Arizona hopes that its law will result in more effective enforcement of the prohibition on employing unauthorized aliens," Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote for the 5-3 majority, adding that "the Arizona regulation does not otherwise conflict with federal law. " The highly anticipated decision keeps intact the 2007 Legal Arizona Workers Act. Under the law, employers' business licenses could be suspended or revoked if they hire illegal immigrants.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The immigration-reform debate has hardly been as fiery in this region as elsewhere in the nation, but even here, the U.S. Supreme Court's complex decision Monday in Arizona v. United States brought a rush of divergent opinion on the ruling's impact. The justices rejected most of Arizona's tough 2010 border-control law but affirmed the "papers, please" provision, which empowers police to investigate the residency status of anyone they stop or arrest and suspect of being undocumented.
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