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Arizona Law

NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The immigration-reform debate has hardly been as fiery in this region as elsewhere in the nation, but even here, the U.S. Supreme Court's complex decision Monday in Arizona v. United States brought a rush of divergent opinion on the ruling's impact. The justices rejected most of Arizona's tough 2010 border-control law but affirmed the "papers, please" provision, which empowers police to investigate the residency status of anyone they stop or arrest and suspect of being undocumented.
SPORTS
May 14, 2010 | By Francisco Delgado, Inquirer Staff Writer
Selig: We're OK with the All-Star Game in Phoenix Commissioner Bud Selig on Thursday turned down calls to move next year's All-Star Game from Phoenix because of a newly enacted Arizona law that empowers police to investigate a person's immigration status. Asked about such demands at a news conference, Selig defended baseball's record of inclusion and cited last month's report from the University of Central Florida's Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports, which gave baseball an "A" for race and a "B" for gender hiring.
NEWS
August 1, 2010
A judge's decision to invalidate the worst elements of Arizona's odious attempt to usurp federal authority over immigration doesn't mean the Obama administration has time to savor the moment. That Arizona and other states feel they must fill the void left by inadequate enforcement of federal immigration laws should have motivated the president long before now to make immigration reform a higher priority. He instead spent tremendous political capital on watered-down, but welcome, health-care reform, and - in large part due to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill - has failed to get traction on climate change.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Mexican President Felipe Calderon's appearance Thursday before a joint session of Congress dramatically illustrated - and possibly reinforced - the partisan divide that has stymied progress on immigration law. Calderon sharply criticized Arizona's tough new immigration law and the United States' refusal to ban assault weapons, which are being used in the violent drug-gang shootouts in Mexico. Afterward, Sen. John Cornyn (R., Texas) said Calderon "crossed a line" by urging changes in gun policy, and Sen. John McCain, (R., Ariz.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Though overshadowed by the shocking decision on health care, the Supreme Court's immigration decision issued three days earlier remains far more significant than appreciated. It was generally viewed as mixed because the Justice Department succeeded in striking down three of the law's provisions. However, on the law's central and most controversial element — requiring officers to inquire into the immigration status of anyone picked up for some other violation — the ruling was definitive and unanimous.
NEWS
August 2, 2011
U.S. sues Alabama on immigrant law The Justice Department sued Alabama's government Monday, arguing that the state's newly passed immigration law conflicts with federal law and is invalid. "A state cannot set its own immigration policy," Justice said in a news release. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley signed the law June 9 broadening police powers, following Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer in requiring local authorities to identify illegal immigrants. Justice last year obtained a preliminary injunction against the Arizona law. Alabama's law, set to take effect Sept.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | Mark Krikorian is executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies
The Supreme Court is almost certainly going to uphold the most controversial portion of Arizona's 2010 immigration law, S.B. 1070 — the requirement that local police check the immigration status of people stopped for other offenses if there's reason to believe they are illegal immigrants. The U.S. Justice Department's case is based on the contention that Congress has prohibited states from assisting federal authorities in enforcing immigration law in this way — a claim that is transparently false and that even the pro-Obama members of the court were not buying during last month's oral arguments.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration acknowledged for the first time yesterday that four American citizens have been killed in drone strikes since 2009 in Pakistan and Yemen. The disclosure to Congress comes on the eve of a major national-security speech by President Obama. In conducting U.S. counterterrorism operations against al Qaeda and its associated forces, the government has targeted and killed one American citizen, Anwar al-Awlaki, and is aware of the killing by U.S. drones of three others, Attorney General Eric Holder said in a letter to Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
I'M WORKING my way through a dilemma. Want to be my shrink? Me: Is City Council misguided, moronic or malicious? Doc: There are usually reasons for aberrant behavior. Me: Doc, the enablers of bad behavior (not their own, for once) unanimously passed a resolution demanding the city stop cooperating with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the main investigative arm of the Department of Homeland Security. Doc: Resolutions are toothless.
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