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Arlen Specter

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NEWS
November 22, 1995
Even if Arlen Specter doesn't pull out of the Republican presidential race at the press conference he has scheduled today, it's only a matter of time. The fact is, Pennsylvania's senior senator hasn't raised the kind of money needed to be competitive in the primaries and - for whatever reason - he has been unable to generate any significant support. He's finished, and he knows it. Because he is eminently realistic, it's hard to believe Specter ever believed he really had a chance.
NEWS
March 3, 2009 | FATIMAH ALI
ARUNNING joke in political circles is that Sen. Arlen Specter is actually wearing a GOP face mask to cover up his Democratic heart. In a meeting billed as the Middle Class Task Force held in Philadelphia last week, Vice President Joe Biden encouraged Specter to change his party affiliation to Democrat. But Specter says his GOP voice is essential to getting things accomplished in Washington, even if it troubles his decades-long political career. I wasn't surprised by Biden's suggestion that Specter change parties because I'd asked Specter the same question a few weeks ago at a meeting with a group of African-American media managers, reporters and editors who questioned him intensely about the $787 billion stimulus package.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
ARLEN SPECTER was a Republican officeholder for 44 years, but when he switched to the Democratic Party in April 2009, it was like a homecoming. Although the move was made for political purposes, the five-term U.S. senator confessed at the time, "I had never felt really comfortable in the Republican caucus. " After all, he had been raised a Democrat in Wichita, Kan., in a family that venerated Franklin D. Roosevelt, and he came to Philadelphia as a Democrat in the 1950s. He became a Republican only when he was denied the support of the Democratic City Committee in his bid to become Philadelphia district attorney in 1965.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
THE FUNERAL for Pennsylvania's longest-serving U.S. senator, Arlen Specter, will be held at noon Tuesday at the Har Zion Temple, in Penn Valley. The synagogue is on Hagys Ford Road near Hollow. His burial will immediately follow at Shalom Memorial Park, on Pine Road near Byberry, in Huntingdon Valley. Vice President Joe Biden is expected to attend the funeral services, which are open to the public. Recording devices and cameras are prohibited. Specter's family asks that donations be contributed to Philadelphia University or another charity in lieu of flowers.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Thomas Fitzgerald, Jessica Parks, and Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writers
Arlen Specter was remembered nationally for his bipartisanship and long career as a statesman as news spread Sunday that the former U.S. senator had died of cancer at 82. From President Obama to a former Eagles wide receiver, dignitaries voiced admiration for the man who, despite an often gruff demeanor, became Pennsylvania's longest-serving U.S. senator by forging compromises. In an interview Sunday, U.S. Sen. Bob Casey told a highly personal story from 2002, when he lost the Democratic primary for governor to Ed Rendell.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, 82, reported Tuesday that he is again fighting cancer, but he said nothing about his condition. Specter, the longest-serving senator in Pennsylvania history, from 1981 through 2010, had kept his illness private until word of it began to leak into the news Monday night. He issued a statement at mid-morning, saying: "I'm battling cancer. It's another battle I intend to win. I'm grateful for all the well wishes I've received. I'm looking forward to getting back to work, to the comedy stage, to the squash court, and to the ballpark.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
THOSE WATCHING Sen. Arlen Specter's long career in public service might at times have felt like they were watching a vigorous tennis match between admiration and disappointment. Admiration, for example, at his vote that torpedoed conservative Supreme Court candidate Robert Bork, then disappointment at his brutal questioning of Anita Hill during Clarence Thomas' hearing. Admiration for his intellect and command of issues, and disappointment at his curious "single-bullet theory" of the Kennedy assassination.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
So an ex-senator walks into a comedy club . . . That's not the setup to a joke - it's what happened Tuesday night when Arlen Specter took the stage at the Helium Comedy Club's open-mike night in Center City. "I've been in comedy now for 30 years," the former senator explained. Taking a try at stand-up was a natural step after spending so many years in the "sit-down comedy" of Congress - and, Specter noted, it was considerably less expensive. While some of his jokes are unprintable in a family newspaper - don't ask about the paraplegic who wanted to date the battered woman - Specter spent much of his three minutes on stage ribbing prominent local and national politicians.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
When I heard on Sunday that Arlen Specter had died, I sought solace in rummaging through personal remnants of our 30-year friendship. My memories span campaigns, Senate hearings, radio broadcasts, martinis, dinners, birthdays, and bat mitzvahs. They include a night in Havana when I watched him debate Fidel Castro at the dinner table, a donnybrook I dubbed "the D.A. vs. the Dictator. " And our time together is evidenced in campaign buttons, ticket stubs to Supreme Court confirmation hearings, tapes of radio broadcasts, manuscripts he wrote, and countless photographs.
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NEWS
April 19, 2016
By Brian Rosenwald Sen. Pat Toomey has won plaudits for his moderation, and to some he might appear to be the latest in Pennsylvania's proud lineage of moderate Republicans senators. But in Toomey's case, the label belies his record. When assessed by Common Space DW-Nominate scores, a scholarly metric that places legislators' voting records along an axis - negative 1 being the farthest left and 1 the farthest right, though Common Space does not assign labels - Toomey amassed the most conservative voting record (.643)
NEWS
April 12, 2016
Today's topic is political déjà vu. Pennsylvania is known for it. Same kind of stuff over and over. It even shows up in campaigns. Take our April 26 Democratic U.S. Senate primary, featuring Joe Sestak, Katie McGinty and John Fetterman. If you're following at all you might be thinking, hey, wait, this feels familiar. You're right. It's not a total match with a past campaign, and Fetterman is certainly something new, but there are similarities between this race and the 2010 Democratic Senate primary, which also featured and was won by one Joe Sestak.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The piece hung over the sofa in Arlen Specter's Capitol office: Framed replicas of the failed U.S. Senate resolution to impeach Bill Clinton, personally signed by all 100 senator/jurors, the House members who prosecuted the case, and members of Clinton's defense team. The meticulous U.S. senator was proud that he had created such a historically significant document, but something nagged at him: "There's one signature we don't have," he told his chief of staff, David Urban. Bill Clinton's.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE CONTRAST in personalities between the two men seemed impassable. How could these guys get along, one might have been tempted to ask. There was Dan McKenna, the jovial, outgoing Irishman, and there was Arlen Specter, the longtime U.S. senator with a reserved demeanor, always careful with his public utterances. Dan was Specter's press aide for 14 years, and according to everybody who worked with them, their relationship was a mutual admiration society if there ever was one. "I think they balanced each other," said Susan Lamontagne, who also worked as a Specter press aide, much of the time with Dan. "Arlen really loved him. " In fact, it was obvious to everybody who came in contact with the two men that the contrasting personalities had a mutual benefit.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The voluminous archives of the late U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter are heading west. Philadelphia University, which has custody, has struck a deal with the University of Pittsburgh to process, preserve, and digitize significant portions of Specter's material, officials announced Monday. The job is huge. Imagine 2,700 boxes of papers, photographs, audio and video materials, and memorabilia. That's enough to fill 337 four-drawer filing cabinets, notes Michael Dabrishus, Pitt's assistant university librarian.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
DESPITE HIS penchant for the Boston brogue, Ben Affleck apparently can do a wicked Philly accent. At least according to William Goldenberg , the Philly-born editor who took home an Oscar recently for his work on the best-picture-winning "Argo. " Goldenberg also was nominated for his work on "Zero Dark Thirty. " According to Goldenberg, Affleck does a spot-on impression of him. "He's a great mimic," Goldenberg said. After Goldenberg, a Northeast High and Temple alum, won his Academy Award, he told reporters that his experience working in his father's Philly deli helped to teach him the importance of keeping all of the plates spinning in his professional career.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
ALLYSON SCHWARTZ used to be known as "Sen. Scarf. " This was during her days in the state Senate, where she served 14 years, and - as you likely figured out - almost always wore a scarf. These days, during her fifth term in Congress, she's wearing something else: a change of heart for a chance to make history. In November, even December, Schwartz seemed certain that she wouldn't challenge Tom Corbett for governor. Now she seems certain that she will. "It is my intention," she tells me, to give up her House seat and take on T.C. Why the change?
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
With a mere three weeks before the election, Joe Biden gave up campaigning in the battlegrounds of Colorado and Nevada Tuesday to remember his Senate Judiciary Committee and Amtrak pal, Arlen Specter. "I thought, 'What would Arlen do?' Arlen wouldn't have even thought about it. Arlen would have been there for me," the vice president told almost 1,500 mourners at Penn Valley's Har Zion Temple. Biden recalled how Specter continually pushed him. "I don't know why I did so much for Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Harold I. Gullan
I was thinking of Arlen Specter while watching this year's first presidential debate, reflecting on how rarely these gaffe-avoidance exercises actually change anyone's preconceptions. The most one-sided political debate I've ever seen was during Pennsylvania's Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in 2010. Specter, the longtime incumbent, simply demolished his challenger, that seasoned old salt Joe Sestak. Specter was by turns the folksy Arlen, recalling his reverence during his modest Kansas upbringing for Franklin D. Roosevelt, the inspiration for his public life - well, that and symbolically getting his father the bonus promised for his service in the First World War - and the "snarlin' Arlen" who would reach for the jugular of any opponent, whatever his or her age or gender.
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