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Arlen Specter

NEWS
November 2, 1992 | By SAM KATZ
This year I vote with a very different perspective on what candidates for public office must go through to achieve electoral success. The change in outlook is the result of running for mayor in 1991. I learned that when all is said and done, what matters most is how clearly the candidate articulates strongly held convictions in a way that others can support and believe in them. In too many instances the attempt to "connect" prompts a strategy of playing to special interests. But in politics as in life all interests are special because they are ours.
NEWS
May 2, 2009
May the Democrats enjoy having Sen. Arlen Specter among their ranks as much as we Republicans did for the past 43 years. Ted Meehan Newtown Square tmeehan@arczip.com Sen. Arlen Specter's defection is welcome news to the Democratic Party. He is a man who is respected for speaking his mind and voting his conscience. Specter is quoted as saying: "My party affiliation does not mean that I will be a party-line voter any more for the Democrats than I was for the Republicans.
NEWS
April 1, 2004
THE Daily News endorsement of liberal Sen. Arlen Specter for re-election is no surprise. But the flowery rhetoric behind the endorsement is misleading at best. For example, the editorial notes that Specter does not always "toe the conservative line. " Understatement of the century. Specter has voted to raise taxes six times as senator and voted to chop the Bush tax cut to help the economy grow. But what was most unfair was the claim that Rep. Pat Toomey gets all his money from out of state "special interests" like the Club for Growth.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com
Assistant U.S. Attorney Laurie Magid will be suspended for 100 days without pay for accepting political contributions from her staff for two Republican candidates, according to an agreement reached with the U.S. Justice Department and Office of Special Counsel. Magid admitted to violating the federal Hatch Act, which limits the political activities of government employees, by receiving contributions from her subordinates for then-U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter and now-U.S. Rep. Pat Meehan in 2008 and 2009.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Sen. Arlen Specter is standing in the middle of the Palmer Park Mall when the old lady comes flying at him and engulfs him in a huge bear hug. "I was looking down here and I said, 'My God! It's Arlen Specter,' " squeals Mary Sheska, 67, a registered Democrat from Bethlehem, as she plants a kiss on his cheek. "I love Arlen Specter. I watch him on TV and all. That's where I got to admire him. " Then she turns to him and says, "That Mrs. Yeakel, she's fine, but she's no competition.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
In the city where a president's assassination and its investigation helped make Arlen Specter a national figure, the Pennsylvania senator fired his single bullet of moderate Republicanism into an audience of independent voters and saw that sucker bounce all over the place. Specter was the last of three dozen speakers - including 10 Republican presidential suitors - who paid homage to Ross Perot and his followers by talking to them about issues at the Dallas Convention Center this weekend.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Arlen Specter sets out on "exploratory travels" tomorrow, testing whether the Christian right's powerful role in last week's GOP triumph leaves any place for Big Tent-ism in the Republican Party - indeed, in the Republic. Sen. Specter, the self-nominated pitcher of the Big Tent, has a hunch, he says, that most of the party faithful - in the old-fashioned sense of the term - aren't knee-jerk against the anti-crime bill, don't deny there's a big health-care problem and are wary about breaching the wall between church and state.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Inquirer staff writer Steve Goldstein
Highly developed egos and a tendency to wave the Constitution led to yesterday's Judiciary Committee smackdown between Sens. Arlen Specter and Russ Feingold. Specter thought he had explained that he was managing the immigration bill on the Senate floor, which necessitated using a cramped room nearby for the meeting and required Specter to briefly leave the session. A passionate defender of gay rights, Feingold took exception to the venue and to Specter's deciding to proceed with barely a quorum, calling it an "affront to the Constitution.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Thomas Fitzgerald,Jessica Parksand Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Former Sen. Arlen Specter was remembered with praise across the nation for his bipartisanship and career as a statesman as news spread Sunday that the veteran lawmaker had died at 82 of cancer at his Philadelphia home. From the president of the United States to a former wide receiver for the Eagles, dignitaries from across the political aisle and beyond issued remembrances echoing respect and admiration for the man who had become, prior to his retirement, Pennsylvania's longest-serving U.S. senator.
NEWS
May 23, 2010
Today's quiz salutes Arlen Specter, the state's longest-serving U.S. senator. 1. Arlen Specter is the son of immigrants. From what country did his father emigrate? a. Poland.       b. Romania.       c. Russia.       d. Lithuania. 2. In what state did Specter grow up? a. Pennsylvania.       b. New Jersey.       c. Iowa.       d. Kansas. 3. Specter shared a hometown with this onetime Republican senator and presidential candidate.
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