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Arlen Specter

NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
I never would have figured Arlen Specter for a South Philadelphian, never in a zillion years, but the junior Republican senator from Pennsylvania has roots at Fourth and Lombard that go back 75 years. His late father migrated from Russia in 1911 to escape service in the czar's army and worked as a pants presser at Fourth and Lombard. And he might have remained a South Philadelphian if he hadn't headed west to pick up a wife in St. Joe's, Mo., and, ultimately, settle down in Kansas, where Arlen Specter was born 56 years ago. I came about this information in the upper rooms at Palumbo's in South Philadelphia the other day when three generations of Palumbo women - Kippee Palumbo, the gorgeous widow of Frank Palumbo; her fetching daughter, Franca Palumbo Limbacher, and her 12-day-old granddaughter, Jessica Limbacher, who weighed in at 6 pounds, 11 ounces the first of the month - hosted a $100-a- plate luncheon for Arlen Specter.
NEWS
June 1, 2010
Democrats in my family had been supporting Arlen Specter since 1986, when his son Shannon organized an outreach effort at Congreso Latino. Specter's campaigns were always tight; he never took anything for granted. But when he became a Democrat, the Democratic machine got Arlen to stop being Arlen. There wasn't the outreach that was so effective that Latino Democrats would vote for a Republican. Politics is local, but Specter stopped being local, and the Democratic Party bosses should blame only one person for that.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | By SAM KATZ
This year I vote with a very different perspective on what candidates for public office must go through to achieve electoral success. The change in outlook is the result of running for mayor in 1991. I learned that when all is said and done, what matters most is how clearly the candidate articulates strongly held convictions in a way that others can support and believe in them. In too many instances the attempt to "connect" prompts a strategy of playing to special interests. But in politics as in life all interests are special because they are ours.
NEWS
May 2, 2009
May the Democrats enjoy having Sen. Arlen Specter among their ranks as much as we Republicans did for the past 43 years. Ted Meehan Newtown Square tmeehan@arczip.com Sen. Arlen Specter's defection is welcome news to the Democratic Party. He is a man who is respected for speaking his mind and voting his conscience. Specter is quoted as saying: "My party affiliation does not mean that I will be a party-line voter any more for the Democrats than I was for the Republicans.
NEWS
April 1, 2004
THE Daily News endorsement of liberal Sen. Arlen Specter for re-election is no surprise. But the flowery rhetoric behind the endorsement is misleading at best. For example, the editorial notes that Specter does not always "toe the conservative line. " Understatement of the century. Specter has voted to raise taxes six times as senator and voted to chop the Bush tax cut to help the economy grow. But what was most unfair was the claim that Rep. Pat Toomey gets all his money from out of state "special interests" like the Club for Growth.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Sen. Arlen Specter is standing in the middle of the Palmer Park Mall when the old lady comes flying at him and engulfs him in a huge bear hug. "I was looking down here and I said, 'My God! It's Arlen Specter,' " squeals Mary Sheska, 67, a registered Democrat from Bethlehem, as she plants a kiss on his cheek. "I love Arlen Specter. I watch him on TV and all. That's where I got to admire him. " Then she turns to him and says, "That Mrs. Yeakel, she's fine, but she's no competition.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
In the city where a president's assassination and its investigation helped make Arlen Specter a national figure, the Pennsylvania senator fired his single bullet of moderate Republicanism into an audience of independent voters and saw that sucker bounce all over the place. Specter was the last of three dozen speakers - including 10 Republican presidential suitors - who paid homage to Ross Perot and his followers by talking to them about issues at the Dallas Convention Center this weekend.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Arlen Specter sets out on "exploratory travels" tomorrow, testing whether the Christian right's powerful role in last week's GOP triumph leaves any place for Big Tent-ism in the Republican Party - indeed, in the Republic. Sen. Specter, the self-nominated pitcher of the Big Tent, has a hunch, he says, that most of the party faithful - in the old-fashioned sense of the term - aren't knee-jerk against the anti-crime bill, don't deny there's a big health-care problem and are wary about breaching the wall between church and state.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By John Baer
TODAY'S TOPIC is political déjà vu. Pennsylvania's known for it. Same kinda stuff over and over. It even shows up in campaigns. Take our April 26 Democratic U.S. Senate primary featuring Joe Sestak, Katie McGinty and John Fetterman. If you're following at all you might be thinking, hey, wait, this feels familiar. You're right. It's not a total match with a past campaign, and Fetterman is certainly something new, but there are similarities between this race and the 2010 Democratic Senate primary, which also featured and was won by one Joe Sestak.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Inquirer staff writer Steve Goldstein
Highly developed egos and a tendency to wave the Constitution led to yesterday's Judiciary Committee smackdown between Sens. Arlen Specter and Russ Feingold. Specter thought he had explained that he was managing the immigration bill on the Senate floor, which necessitated using a cramped room nearby for the meeting and required Specter to briefly leave the session. A passionate defender of gay rights, Feingold took exception to the venue and to Specter's deciding to proceed with barely a quorum, calling it an "affront to the Constitution.
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