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Arlen Specter

NEWS
October 16, 2012
Arlen Specter was a fighter. He fought crime as a prosecutor. He fought political opponents as a U.S. senator. He fought cancer on more than one occasion. But most of all, he fought for the people of the adopted state that became dear to him - Pennsylvania. Specter died Sunday from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was 82. Having been elected to the U.S. Senate in 1980, 1986, 1992, 1998, and 2004, Specter served in that office longer than anyone in Pennsylvania history.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
THOSE WATCHING Sen. Arlen Specter's long career in public service might at times have felt like they were watching a vigorous tennis match between admiration and disappointment. Admiration, for example, at his vote that torpedoed conservative Supreme Court candidate Robert Bork, then disappointment at his brutal questioning of Anita Hill during Clarence Thomas' hearing. Admiration for his intellect and command of issues, and disappointment at his curious "single-bullet theory" of the Kennedy assassination.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At least 1,500 people, including Vice President Biden, are expected at the funeral of former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter at noon Tuesday at Har Zion Temple in Penn Valley. The 11/2-hour service at the Conservative synagogue will be followed by burial in Shalom Memorial Park in Huntingdon Valley. The service is open to the public, but cameras and recording devices are prohibited. Lower Merion Township police said they were anticipating a "phenomenal" amount of traffic for the service for one of America's most prominent politicians.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
WHETHER you thought of him as "Darlin' Arlen" or "Snarlin' Arlen" or not at all, Arlen Specter was the most interesting, complex and complete politician of our time. From an unlikely start in rural Kansas, to Philly D.A., to a run for president, from the Warren Commission to a Senate post of power that put people on and kept people off the U.S. Supreme Court, Specter served the city, state and nation in, well, unconventional ways. There was no one like him. There never will be anyone like him. Originally and finally a Democrat, he spent his long career as an elected Republican, although his party label never predicted his policies or his views.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
With a mere three weeks before the election, Joe Biden gave up campaigning in the battlegrounds of Colorado and Nevada Tuesday to remember his Senate Judiciary Committee and Amtrak pal, Arlen Specter. "I thought, 'What would Arlen do?' Arlen wouldn't have even thought about it. Arlen would have been there for me," the vice president told almost 1,500 mourners at Penn Valley's Har Zion Temple. Biden recalled how Specter continually pushed him. "I don't know why I did so much for Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
When I heard on Sunday that Arlen Specter had died, I sought solace in rummaging through personal remnants of our 30-year friendship. My memories span campaigns, Senate hearings, radio broadcasts, martinis, dinners, birthdays, and bat mitzvahs. They include a night in Havana when I watched him debate Fidel Castro at the dinner table, a donnybrook I dubbed "the D.A. vs. the Dictator. " And our time together is evidenced in campaign buttons, ticket stubs to Supreme Court confirmation hearings, tapes of radio broadcasts, manuscripts he wrote, and countless photographs.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
ARLEN SPECTER was a Republican officeholder for 44 years, but when he switched to the Democratic Party in April 2009, it was like a homecoming. Although the move was made for political purposes, the five-term U.S. senator confessed at the time, "I had never felt really comfortable in the Republican caucus. " After all, he had been raised a Democrat in Wichita, Kan., in a family that venerated Franklin D. Roosevelt, and he came to Philadelphia as a Democrat in the 1950s. He became a Republican only when he was denied the support of the Democratic City Committee in his bid to become Philadelphia district attorney in 1965.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, 82, a driven, often-contentious figure who placed himself at the center of national controversies for a half-century, from the Kennedy assassination investigation in the 1960s to the passage of the economic-stimulus package in 2009, died Sunday morning at home in East Falls. Specter, Pennsylvania's longest-serving senator, with 30 years in Washington, died at 11:39 a.m. from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, his family said. He announced Aug. 28 that he was again fighting cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Dan Gross
AMONG THOSE who will miss Arlen Specter are his comedy buddies. The former longtime U.S. senator, who died of cancer Sunday at 82, released a statement while hospitalized recently that he looked forward to getting back on the stand-up comedy stage. He was booked to perform Nov. 16 at the Media Theatre with 94 WIP's Big Daddy Graham and Joe Conklin . Graham recalls the first time he worked with Specter at the Phoenixville Theater a couple of years back. "I had never met him, but had interviewed him a lot on the air. I was sitting in the green room waiting to go on," Graham said.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
By Malcolm Lazin In 1977, having successfully headed federal grand jury investigations into public corruption, I ran as a Republican for Philadelphia district attorney. Arlen Specter, who had lost his bid for reelection as district attorney four years earlier despite having distinguished himself as a prosecutor, served as honorary chairman of my campaign, and we met once a week. While I ended up losing to a then-unknown Democrat named Edward Rendell, I won in that I learned from Specter and became his friend.
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