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Armistice Day

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NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By Henry Spier
Veterans Day was once Armistice Day. The holiday commemorated the conclusion of the First World War, which ended at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1919. During my childhood, World War I veterans mounted parades along thoroughfares across the country. Today, living memory of the Great War is all but vanished. Nonetheless, I can't help but recall Armistice Day when Nov. 11 rolls around. Veterans Day has evolved from its original purpose to reflect the march of time.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
November 11 will forever remind Dorothy Blair of the Armistice Day celebration her beloved uncle captured on paper in 1918. Thomas Staller Edwards was 19 and at work in Center City when news arrived that World War I had ended. "When the mad crowd went rushing and roaring past . . . I completely lost my head. I grabbed all the papers from my desk and dumped them out the window," he wrote. "I wanted to kiss someone. I ran out on Chestnut St. and kissed all the pretty girls.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
In the last 60 years, Americans have fought in wars and conflicts all over the globe. A new cohort of veterans will return from the battlefields of Iraq. What are your thoughts as this Veterans Day - originally the Armistice Day of World War I - approaches? Do you look back on your own or your family's experience of war? Do you have words for the returning veterans of this latest conflict? Send letters or essays of about 200 to 300 words to South Jersey Voices, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | BY DAVID GRACIE
November 11 was Armistice Day before it became known as Veterans Day. That's how I knew it when I was growing up. And I knew from immediate family history that the armistice being celebrated had marked the end of World War I, "the war to end all wars. " Uncle Alexander died in that war, fighting with a Scottish regiment somewhere in France. Uncle John survived, but he had had a ship blown out from under him in the Dardanelles. My grandfather David was a survivor too. He lived with recurrent bouts of malaria and recurring My Lai-type dreams resulting from his combat duty in Palestine.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | by Richard C. Wald, From the New York Times
I was a kid during World War II and I loved the machinery of it. New cars, if there were any, could not be half as fascinating as bombers, and I tried to spot Junkers and Dorniers as easily as I could tell a Chrysler from a Chevy. If a Stuka dive-bombed Times Square this afternoon, I could still identify it by the outline. Other kids were following their fathers' Army careers, but it was not my father's war. He came here from Germany as a grown man and when he went to the draft board the morning after Pearl Harbor to enlist, he was turned down because of age. So I drilled him on civil defense and I got all the flashcards of bomber outlines.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The wind was so strong that it blew unbrellas inside out at times, and the rain never stopped falling, but those who gathered in Media at the Delaware County Courthouse Sunday afternoon to honor the county's veterans reminded one another that it also rains on foxholes and battlefields. The annual Delaware County Veterans Parade, a 15-year tradition, began at 1:30 p.m., recalling the moment on Nov. 11, 1918, when the shooting stopped in World War I. That day originally was celebrated as Armistice Day, later becoming Veterans Day, honoring all the men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces.
NEWS
November 11, 1989
For years, it was called Armistice Day, commemorating the signing of the armistice that ended what was supposed to be the War to End All Wars. When a second world war proved that to be a false hope, the holiday became Veterans Day, honoring veterans of both wars. Since then, we've sent our young people out twice more to risk life and limb for their country. As long as there are war veterans, there's a need for Veterans Day. Not as an occasion to glorify war or to justify jingoistic adventurism, but as a tribute to the kids who should have been home going on with their lives, instead of being forced to kill or be killed.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By Anthony Waskie
What we know as Veterans Day originally was commemorated as the cessation of hostilities, or armistice, during World War I. Nov. 11 was set aside for special observance by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. Wilson reflected on the reason for the commemoration: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory . . . " It was hoped that this day would be observed with parades, speeches, decorations and ceremonies to honor our fallen, and those who bore the battle.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Teachers at Chichester High School wanted their students to know that today wasn't just another day off. So, they held an essay and poster contest, organized an assembly, and introduced students to veterans from both World Wars, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Yesterday, ninth-grade American history students got more than the average introduction to Veterans Day. Today, they learned, is the 76th anniversary of the armistice that...
NEWS
November 11, 2009
Seven years after the end of World War I, Congress urged the recognition of Nov. 11 - then Armistice Day - with these words: "It is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace... " Yesterday, appropriately, the prayers, led by the commander in chief, were directed at Fort Hood, Texas, where 13 people were killed and 29 others wounded last week in a shooting rampage. The nation's thoughts and good wishes will remain with the Fort Hood community for some time, added to the daily prayers to keep safe all those who serve in harm's way. But also, on this Veterans Day, the nation takes up its solemn responsibility to say thanks and try to bring some peace.
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NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the snowy December day when his Eagles won the 1948 NFL title, Nick Basca's long journey home was underway. He hadn't worn the green-and-white uniform since that infamous Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941. In the intervening years, the Phoenixville resident had traveled thousands of miles. Now, at last, he was coming back, a hero again. On Nov. 11, 1944 - Armistice Day, ironically - Basca was killed in the woods near Orbec, France. A tank-commanding corporal in Gen. George Patton's Third Army, he died instantly when a German mortar tore through his armored vehicle.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
November 11 will forever remind Dorothy Blair of the Armistice Day celebration her beloved uncle captured on paper in 1918. Thomas Staller Edwards was 19 and at work in Center City when news arrived that World War I had ended. "When the mad crowd went rushing and roaring past . . . I completely lost my head. I grabbed all the papers from my desk and dumped them out the window," he wrote. "I wanted to kiss someone. I ran out on Chestnut St. and kissed all the pretty girls.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
Seven years after the end of World War I, Congress urged the recognition of Nov. 11 - then Armistice Day - with these words: "It is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace... " Yesterday, appropriately, the prayers, led by the commander in chief, were directed at Fort Hood, Texas, where 13 people were killed and 29 others wounded last week in a shooting rampage. The nation's thoughts and good wishes will remain with the Fort Hood community for some time, added to the daily prayers to keep safe all those who serve in harm's way. But also, on this Veterans Day, the nation takes up its solemn responsibility to say thanks and try to bring some peace.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By Henry Spier
Veterans Day was once Armistice Day. The holiday commemorated the conclusion of the First World War, which ended at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1919. During my childhood, World War I veterans mounted parades along thoroughfares across the country. Today, living memory of the Great War is all but vanished. Nonetheless, I can't help but recall Armistice Day when Nov. 11 rolls around. Veterans Day has evolved from its original purpose to reflect the march of time.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By Anthony Waskie
What we know as Veterans Day originally was commemorated as the cessation of hostilities, or armistice, during World War I. Nov. 11 was set aside for special observance by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919. Wilson reflected on the reason for the commemoration: "To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country's service and with gratitude for the victory . . . " It was hoped that this day would be observed with parades, speeches, decorations and ceremonies to honor our fallen, and those who bore the battle.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
In the last 60 years, Americans have fought in wars and conflicts all over the globe. A new cohort of veterans will return from the battlefields of Iraq. What are your thoughts as this Veterans Day - originally the Armistice Day of World War I - approaches? Do you look back on your own or your family's experience of war? Do you have words for the returning veterans of this latest conflict? Send letters or essays of about 200 to 300 words to South Jersey Voices, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
December 3, 2001
Child services must not suffer Acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco has proposed a $486 million budget freeze, $15 million of which would result from slowing down implementation of the Children's System of Care Initiative. The state is facing the grim reality of enormous budget shortfalls. However, the troubled children of our state should not continue to fall through the cracks of the service system because of budget problems. This initiative, hailed by parents and professionals alike, is the first real comprehensive reform effort in children's services in 30 years.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
On this day 79 years ago, the so-called War to End All Wars ended with the scratching of pens in a French rail car. World War I certainly failed to deliver on its nickname. It proved a mere warm-up, a stretching of muscles, for a bloody-minded century that brought cruel ingenuity to the age-old act of slaughter. Nov. 11 was originally commemorated in America as Armistice Day. In 1954, that was changed to Veterans Day, in recognition that this century was proving far more adept at creating veterans than peace.
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