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Arms Embargo

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NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian security forces arrested hundreds of activists and antigovernment demonstrators in house-to-house raids Monday, part of an escalating crackdown aimed at stamping out a revolt engulfing the country. The government's punishing response triggered new international sanctions, as the European Union imposed an arms embargo. The measure, which followed U.S. sanctions, also bars 13 Syrian government officials from traveling anywhere in the 27-nation EU and freezes their assets.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | By Richard Cohen
Should the arms embargo on Bosnia be lifted? Many in Congress, including key Republicans, favor such a course and so do some members of the Clinton administration. They argue that the proverbial playing field should be leveled. At this end of the Balkans a different view prevails: The playing field would not be leveled but merely extended. The war in Bosnia would come to Greece. It would come in the form of refugees - countless ethnic Albanians pressing south, fleeing war further up the peninsula.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Leaders of six Arab nations ended a four-day summit today denouncing Iran for aggressive acts against Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and for attacks on commercial ships in the Persian Gulf. The nations attending the Gulf Cooperation Council conference also called on the U.N. Security Council to enforce its July demand for a cease-fire in the Iran-Iraq war. The Security Council has said it is prepared to discuss an arms embargo against Iran. Conference sources said the alliance discussed the formation of a joint arms industry and a common strategy for defending their coastlines, offshore oil installations and tankers against Iranian attacks.
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After days of violence and failed diplomatic efforts in Bosnia, President Clinton described the situation yesterday as "grim and uncertain" as the administration faced a series of unattractive alternatives. "This has not been a great weekend for the peace effort," Clinton said before departing for Milwaukee to push for his health-care reform proposals. For several hours yesterday afternoon, his top foreign policy advisers met to consider their next step in the face of failing diplomacy.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | By Robert A. Rankin and David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Nolan Walters of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
The Senate is expected to vote today to reject President Clinton's policy on Bosnia, despite Clinton's determined struggle to overcome the most serious challenge yet to his authority to direct U.S. foreign policy. A bipartisan resolution calling for the United States to abandon the U.N. embargo against arms for Bosnia so that its embattled Muslim government can better defend itself against ethnic-cleansing Serbs is expected to win overwhelming Senate approval. "It will make a bad situation worse," Clinton said of the resolution sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R., Kan.)
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | By MARLENE NADLE
It is still possible to avoid repeating the mistake World War I diplomats made in the Balkans when they carelessly carved up the map in a way that heaped up trouble for the future. President Clinton can provide an honorable alternative to the Bosnian partition plan that was approved this week by the Muslim-Croat federation and essentially rejected by the Bosnian Serbs. He can refuse to waste any more time on this plan and start with a fresh strategy encouraging the Europeans to withdraw their peacekeepers.
NEWS
September 28, 1994 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Last month, President Clinton issued an ultimatum to the Bosnian Serbs: Either accept a peace plan or face the consequences of the United States ending its arms embargo to the Muslim-led Bosnian government. But with the deadline three weeks away, Clinton will not have to follow through on his threat after all. Instead, the President is getting a reprieve from an unlikely player: the Bosnian government. In an abrupt policy shift, the Bosnian government said it does not want an immediate lifting of the arms embargo.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The State Department said yesterday that it would be willing to study a Soviet proposal for the creation of a United Nations naval force for the Persian Gulf if the U.N. Security Council approves an arms embargo against Iran. Deputy spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley said, however, that the United States would oppose any linkage between the proposed U.N. naval force and the U.S. task force in the gulf, which has been deployed to protect Kuwaiti tankers flying the Stars and Stripes. The Soviets have proposed the creation of a U.N. naval force to police an arms embargo against Iran.
NEWS
July 7, 1993
DON'T LIFT THE ARMS EMBARGO ON BOSNIA Members of the international community have renewed their calls to lift the arms embargo on the Bosnian government. This time an unholy axis of Bonn and Washington is promoting the idea. Let's get a few things straight about lifting the embargo. First, it is the quickest way to guarantee the total liquidation of Bosnia's Muslim population. The Serbs and the Croats are both bitterly opposed to it. To lift the embargo is to cement their military alliance in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The Soviet Union and China have quietly informed the Reagan administration they support in principle imposing an arms embargo against Iran if it refuses to heed a cease-fire in the Persian Gulf war, U.S. officials said yesterday. The U.N. Security Council is expected to order the cease-fire later this week, but Iran is determined to keep fighting until Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is forced out. The arms boycott would be taken up by the council within 30 to 45 days. The support of the Soviet Union and China is considered essential since either could block an embargo with a veto vote.
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NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Raf Casert and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The European Union has decided to lift the arms embargo on the Syrian opposition while maintaining all other sanctions against President Bashar al-Assad's regime after June 1, British Foreign Secretary William Hague said late Monday. The decision "sends a very strong message from Europe to the Assad regime," Hague said after an all-day meeting that laid bare EU hesitation on feeding arms in a foreign conflict only months after it won the Nobel Peace Prize. Hague insisted that Britain had "no immediate plans to send arms to Syria.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
BRUSSELS, Belgium - France and Britain are pressing the European Union to end its embargo on arms for the Syrian opposition, in the hope that they can encourage President Obama to follow their lead. French and British leaders' frustration with U.S. waffling on Syria was palpable in Brussels last week. As the flood of refugees from Syria grew to tsunami levels, threatening to destabilize much of the region, French President Francois Hollande declared bluntly, "The biggest risk is inaction.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration lent its support Monday to British and French plans to arm Syria's rebels, saying it wouldn't stand in the way of any country seeking to rebalance the fight against a regime supported by Russia, Iran, and Hezbollah. Secretary of State John Kerry said the longer Syria's war goes on, the greater the danger of its institutions collapsing and extremists getting their hands on the country's vast chemical weapons arsenal. With 450,000 Syrians living in neighboring countries as refugees already, he said the conflict is becoming a "global catastrophe.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
China formally installs leader BEIJING - Capping a highly choreographed transition of power, Xi Jinping formally assumed the Chinese presidency Thursday after a vote at the National People's Congress. The 59-year-old son of a former vice premier was elected with an enviable margin of 2,952 votes in favor to one against. Under the Chinese political system, there is no formal inauguration. After the vote was announced in Beijing's Great Hall of the People, Xi bowed to the deputies and shook hands with his predecessor, Hu Jintao.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Edith M. Lederer, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - The Security Council on Wednesday extended an arms embargo against armed groups in Congo, condemning a rebel group believed to be backed by Rwanda for attacking civilians. In a resolution adopted unanimously, the council extended sanctions against armed groups in Congo until Feb. 1, 2014, and said it would consider more measures against leaders of the M23 rebel group and those providing support. The M23, made up of hundreds of soldiers who deserted the Congolese army in April, has taken control of many villages and towns in the mineral-rich east since then, culminating in last week's seizure of the provincial capital, Goma.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Anne Gearan and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
PARIS - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called Thursday for the U.N. Security Council to adopt an arms embargo and other tough measures against Syria to try to halt 13 months of bloodshed, but she acknowledged that such diplomatic actions would likely be vetoed. Clinton's comments to Western and Arab diplomats from the so-called "Friends of Syria" group came as the head of the United Nations accused Syrian President Bashar al-Assad of failing to honor a peace plan that went into effect a week ago. In a transcript of her remarks on the State Department's website, Clinton stopped short of calling for outside military intervention in Syria - something there is little to no foreign appetite for - but said it was time to impose more consequential measures on Assad's regime.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House of Representatives sent President Obama a strong bipartisan message yesterday that it is frustrated and impatient with the U.S. military mission in Libya. The House voted 295-123 to deny congressional consent for extending the 3-month-old effort for another year. But the House would not take the extra step of denying funding for the mission. A bid led by Rep. Thomas Rooney, R-Fla., to cut off money for all but search-and-rescue, intelligence, aerial refueling and noncombat operations got bipartisan support, but lost on a 238-180 vote; 144 Republicans and 36 Democrats supported the restrictions.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian security forces arrested hundreds of activists and antigovernment demonstrators in house-to-house raids Monday, part of an escalating crackdown aimed at stamping out a revolt engulfing the country. The government's punishing response triggered new international sanctions, as the European Union imposed an arms embargo. The measure, which followed U.S. sanctions, also bars 13 Syrian government officials from traveling anywhere in the 27-nation EU and freezes their assets.
NEWS
December 3, 2009 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a grainy undercover videotape recorded in a hotel room in Tbilisi, Georgia, an Iranian arms merchant chats with two Philadelphia salesmen who have brought samples of their military wares. The merchant, Amir Hossein Ardebili, who has flown from Tehran to make a deal, patiently answers the Americans' questions. The radar microchips? Needed for antimissile protection. The sophisticated computers? Essential to "launch the F-4" fighter. All of it, he says flatly, is destined for the Iranian military "because they think the war is coming.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Peter Brookes
Later this year, the European Union will consider lifting the Tiananmen Square arms embargo against the People's Republic of China. The United States and the EU imposed the embargo following the June 1989 crackdown on democracy protestors in Beijing. Lifting the embargo would endanger U.S. interests, accelerate China's military buildup, undermine stability in the Pacific, and encourage repressive regimes everywhere. The U.S. is rightfully concerned about the proposed EU policy change.
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