CollectionsArms Race
IN THE NEWS

Arms Race

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a Pentagon planner, Eugene Carroll Jr. helped decide where the bombs would fall, which foreign cities would survive and which would vanish in a flash of nuclear light. He knew that the missiles aimed at one particular target - he didn't say which one - would kill 600,000 civilians. And Carroll, then a Navy rear admiral, knew something else: that nuclear war wasn't worth the cost. "Everything you fight over you destroy," he said yesterday. "Everyone in the military realizes you can't fight with the weapons.
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | By Robert K. Musil
If we step back a moment from the instant analysis and punditry following the Reykjavik summit meeting, we can see President Reagan's finest hour or his failure, depending upon your politics, as simply the latest variation in a historic American negotiating pattern in the nuclear age that transcends parties and presidents: It is a tradition that has not served us well. Put bluntly, American presidents have chosen at each crucial stage of the nuclear arms race to forgo cooperation until the United States developed and exploited new weapons technologies that it was believed would give us political advantage over the slower, stolid Soviets.
NEWS
April 13, 1986
In the Rubik's Cube world of U.S.-Soviet arms-control wrangling, nothing ever seems to click. There's always an interruption - a brushfire war, a change of leadership, a human-rights campaign, profound distrust - derailing agreement. It looked for a moment as if the Soviets' proposed freeze on underground nuclear testing might overcome that. It seemed to have something for everybody. But last week an atomic explosion 1,300 feet below the Nevada desert wrote an end to even that faint hope.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
In the annals of self-inflicted national injuries, there's a prominent place for the federal government's misguided values in spending scarce research money. The latest figures show that $37 billion, or about 53 percent of government research funds, is spent seeking better tools of war, and $12 billion, or 17 percent, on preventing and treating disease. Even less is allocated to basic science, energy, agriculture and environmental tasks. There's something topsy-turvy in these choices, and it's bound to get worse.
NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
To Flaura Winston, a student at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, there is a certain absurdity about pursuing a medical degree in the nuclear age. "What's the point if we're going to be destroyed in a nuclear war?" Winston said. "We've got to try and do something about it. " On a warm, sunny fall morning yesterday, she and nearly 200 other Philadelphia-area physicians and medical students did just that: They joined in a five-mile run along Kelly Drive to focus more attention on the need to control nuclear arms.
NEWS
October 2, 1995 | By Eugene J. Carroll
During 45 years of the Cold War, the United States engaged in a heated arms race with the Soviet Union. Now it appears that America is engaged in an arms race with itself. Incredibly, this race is heating up in a bidding war between a Republican Congress committed under the Contract With America to increase defense spending, and the Clinton administration, determined not to be outdone in its support for increased military readiness. Our present level of military spending virtually equals the combined military spending of all other nations.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 300 people gathered in Philadelphia yesterday for the annual meeting of the American Friends Service Committee, where a series of speakers - in the subdued tones of the Quaker movement - denounced American military policy. Vincent Harding, a historian and civil rights activist who was the featured speaker of the event, told the audience that they must speak out more strongly against the arms race if they are to be effective. "I think I might like to write about the need - the absolute need - for the United States of America to become militarily weaker as a positive step to growing spiritually stronger," he said.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
Pope John Paul II issued a new appeal to President Reagan yesterday to seek an end to the arms race and to ease world poverty, lecturing that it is not enough to give "mere lip service" to moral causes. After a 55-minute private meeting with Reagan in the papal library, John Paul recalled that during Reagan's last visit to the Vatican, in 1982, he urged him to pursue "constructive negotiations" to end the arms race and alleviate hunger and misery. "I am confident, Mr. President, that you share my continued concern about these issues," the Pope said in remarks that offered no praise for the President's policies.
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | BY DONALD KAUL
I'm putting away my little American flag, the one I used to stick in my lapel to walk unharmed through revolutions in hostile countries. It won't even get you through a peace march in Canada these days. Ronald Reagan may be the Great Communicator to us, but to a lot of the rest of the world, he is the Great Klutz, more dangerous to world peace than the Rooskies. I kid you not. I spent part of last week in this sparkling port city that bills itself "the Peace Capital of North America.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the usually bare stone pillar that marks the entrance to the City Cemetery, a new, hand-painted sign expressed concisely the message of a small band of protesters who came to the cemetery Tuesday evening to sing, pray and mourn. "Paupers' Field," read the sign erected by the demonstrators. "Forgotten in Life. Forgotten in Death. " But the three dozen area peace activists gathered to say that they had not forgotten the poor who are buried in the cemetery at Dunks Ferry and Mechanicsville Roads.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Spurgeon M. Keeny Jr., 87, an arms-control expert who held top positions at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency during the Cold War and later ran an influential Washington think tank that advises policymakers on nuclear proliferation, died Aug. 10 at his home in Washington. He had cancer, said his daughter, Virginia Keeny. Mr. Keeny was a prominent scholar in his field at a time when the U.S.-Soviet arms race was one of the most important national concerns. A Soviet expert, he gained much of his early experience as an assistant to the White House science adviser during the Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
How much is too much? How about $2 billion? That's the amount Republicans, Democrats, and all those confoundingly named PACs are projected to spend on the two major nominees in the 2012 presidential campaign, which is double the amount the top contenders spent four years ago. Consider all the good such vast mountains of capital could accomplish rather than ensuring that, whenever you turn on the television or search the Internet, there's an...
BUSINESS
November 27, 2011
"It shows that there's a bigger problem at hand, and if they can't work to resolve these relatively small yet meaningful issues, what's going to happen if we get into a situation like Europe is in? And we're kind of headed there. " - Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist with Banyan Partners L.L.C., on the congressional supercommittee's failure to reach a deficit-cutting deal. "Markets are looking for clarity, and you didn't get that from the supercommittee. There's no reason to believe the economy is going to get stronger.
NEWS
May 21, 2011
U.N. to analyze nuclear accident UNITED NATIONS - The United Nations will undertake a systemwide study on the implications of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Friday. Several agencies will prepare a report addressing the effects of nuclear safety in areas including environment, health, and food security. It is to be presented at a high-level meeting on nuclear safety and security Sept. 22 during the General Assembly in New York.
NEWS
March 27, 2011
Bill Lyon is the author of Deadlines and Overtimes: Collected Writings on Sports and Life Attention. . . . Attention, Phillies fans. . . . Your attention, please. . . . Now boarding on Track 4, the 3:10 to Panicville . . . Making station stops at Utley's Patella . . . Lidge's Biceps . . . Polanco's Elbow . . . and Uh-Oh Junction. . . . Kindly step to the rear. . . . We're already full. . . . All aboard, and, please, watch your step. And so it is that the professional baseball team of Philadelphia, an old established firm, invites your interest, your attendance, and especially your money as it readies for the 2011 season.
SPORTS
September 1, 2010 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
Pictures of past Penncrest High teams adorn the school's weight-room walls. They go back, some way back. Many are in black-and-white, some in color. If you look closely enough, the players in those pictures also come in a variety of sizes, all looking a little heftier and beefier. None, however, will be heftier and beefier than the picture of the 2010 Penncrest team. Players are getting larger, and this Lions team carries particular interest because it will have the largest offensive line in school history.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many of its students, the neighborhood around South Philadelphia High has been a dangerous place. For 17-year-olds Tyrell Smack and Tyree Parks, it was deadly. The two would have been seniors this spring, preparing for graduation. In July, Smack was shot and killed; in January, it was Parks' turn, gunned down as he walked home from coaching a youth basketball game. Another South Philadelphia High student, Sean Allen, wanted to honor their memories and take a few steps toward reversing the school's violent reputation - one made worse by recent attacks on Asian students, and the ensuing controversy about the school's response.
NEWS
December 6, 2008 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police officers will be permitted to carry larger-caliber handguns next year, part of a wide-ranging effort that Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey is making to upgrade the department's weaponry to match adversaries carrying bigger guns. Ramsey announced yesterday that officers will have the option to replace their 9mm pistols with more powerful .40- and .45-caliber semiautomatic handguns. The sidearms are produced by Austrian gunmaker Glock. Though two of four Philadelphia officers killed in the line of duty this year were shot by fugitives carrying powerful guns - one fired an assault rifle - Ramsey was careful not to characterize the decision to upgrade as an escalation.
NEWS
March 2, 2007
Political supporters known as "bundlers" are an inevitable part of federal election campaigns. Bundlers are wealthy or well-connected individuals who promise to raise, well, bundles of cash for a candidate, in return for who knows what. In the case of former Texas state Sen. Teel Bivins, the reward for being a "bundler" for George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004 was an appointment as U.S. ambassador to Sweden. Bivins was a Bush "pioneer" in 2000, raising at least $100,000 from other donors.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|