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NEWS
November 16, 1991
Of course, it's just a coincidence. It just seems as though every time President Bush slips in the popularity polls, we're embroiled in another foreign crisis. Surely, the latest flap with Libya has nothing to do with Americans getting more and more disgruntled over domestic problems. Yet there is nothing like a good juicy overseas villain to distract us. Once the war drums start beating and the yellow ribbons sprout everywhere, it becomes unpatriotic - maybe even treasonous - to criticize our commander-in- chief, no matter how his administration is lousing up the economy, among other things.
SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | by John Holyoke, For the Daily News
For 39 minutes, University of Maine defenders took turns frantically chasing Drexel's Mike DeRocckis through the labyrinth of screens that make up the world of a long-range bomber. For about 31 of those minutes, the Black Bears did a pretty good job on the junior guard. And in the other eight minutes, De-Rocckis won the game. DeRocckis finished with a 22-point effort - largely on the strength of crunch-time spurts at the end of each half - and the Dragons earned a 78-63 victory over the Bears last night.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Win the day. " "The best ability is durability. " "Other guy is a chin-strap away. " Of all the Chip Kelly-isms, "Big people beat up little people" may be the best example of his philosophy on football. The new Eagles coach doesn't necessarily want to stockpile his roster with 350-pound behemoths, but he does prefer long athletes with large wingspans. Why? "Long levers are strong levers. Do you want to get hit with a big stick or a little stick?" Kelly said. "So arm length determines how big you are and how big you play.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
Police Commissioner John Timoney (Op-ed, March 2) reaffirms the Second Amendment right to bear arms but insists on prior restraint on the exercise of that right through a permit process. He can't have it both ways. If keeping and bearing arms is truly a right, it is unconstitutional to require a permit. On the other hand, if government insists on prohibiting gun possession until it decides to issue a permit, keeping and bearing arms is not a right but a revocable privilege. SHELDON RICHMAN Editor, Ideas on Liberty Irvington, N.Y. John Timoney makes a reasonable case for mandatory gun training for carry-permit holders, but such a program would have to be funded by taxpayer dollars.
NEWS
March 13, 1987
Every arms-limitation proposal coming from the Soviets seems to be greeted by suspicion that it's a "trap. " In the most recent example, Adam M. Garfinkel (Op-ed Page, March 6) argued that acceptance would leave the Soviets with a greater number of missiles than allowed us. Such argument makes sense only in a non-nuclear war. Nuclear powers involved in war will never accept defeat without recourse to the most powerful weapons in their arsenals. At that point the scientists, as distinguished from the politicians, tell us it won't matter whether it's 500 or 5,000 warheads.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | BY DALE E. WILSON
A lot of people are missing the point about arms sales to Iran. I too was upset when I first heard about our new "Arms for the Ayatollah" policy, but when I heard that Marine Lt. Col. Ollie North, a fellow Vietnam veteran, was the mastermind, I reconsidered the matter and discovered the subtle wisdom in it. Those of us who fought in Southeast Asia long ago discovered the hapless inefficiency of American-made weapons. Ask any ex-GI which rifle he would rather have carried - the Soviet-made AK-47 or our own M-16?
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Paul H. Nitze, top arms control adviser in the Reagan administration, says President Bush is missing a strategic opportunity by refusing to open talks with the Soviets on short-range nuclear missiles in Europe. In an interview in today's New York Times, the 82-year-old veteran negotiator says talks on cutting back on missiles with a range of less than 300 miles would actually be in the interest of the West. They would provide an opportunity to eliminate a large advantage held by the Soviet Union, he said.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
It's obvious that the Rev. Thomas Smith Jr. is a compassionate person, a man who believes that nobody is all bad and that even the worst of us can be redeemed. So why would such a decent, compassionate clergyman fear that some of his angry neighbors might want to bump him off? Well, it's unfortunate for Smith, but some of his neighbors don't share his brand of compassion. The minister recently decided to provide a home for an ex-convict named Lawrence Singleton. Singleton, 60, isn't your ordinary, run-of-the-mill ex-con.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Everywhere the camera looks in The Dark Backward, an exercise in puerile and self-conscious grossness masquerading as satire, there is garbage. It is heaped in towering landfills and it flies in blizzards of trash and debris along the dark alleys of an unnamed city. The point that writer- director Adam Rifkin wants to make is that we live in a garbage-in/garbage- out culture. He makes it with a film that is mostly garbage itself. The Dark Backward (a title presumably designed to identify the level of intelligence to which Rifkin is appealing)
NEWS
March 7, 1991
Now comes the hard part. Unless the United States takes its own rhetoric seriously, it is only a matter of a short time before people start dying in droves in the Middle East again, killed by fancy modern weapons provided by members of "the coalition. " The odds are against a new world order in which the good guys refrain from selling their nastiest technology all over the Middle East. In fact, the Wall Street Journal this week quoted the exultant president of Hughes Aircraft Co. about the "very hot prospects" in the region for the snazzy American war machinery that smashed the Iraqis.
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