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SPORTS
March 31, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Non-Public South A tournament will be decided by a championship game June 3. That's how it works in high school baseball. But the remarkable thing about the top three contenders for the title - who also are the top three teams in The Inquirer's preseason Top 20 rankings - is that they all would be better equipped to settle the matter in a best-of-five series. Or a best of seven. "We could do that," St. Augustine senior righthander Joey Gatto said, considering the pitching depth that marks his team as well as perennial powerhouses Gloucester Catholic and Bishop Eustace.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MORE THAN 40 shots were fired in two heated gunbattles last night, one of which took place between a cop and an armed man, police said. In that incident, on Louden Street near Mascher in Feltonville, the 21-year-old was struck once in his shoulder, and a second bullet grazed his head, Chief Inspector Scott Small said. He's in stable condition at Temple University Hospital, where he was taken by the same officers he took aim at just before 5:30 p.m., Small said. Small gave the following account: Two officers were assisting representatives from the Department of Human Services at an unrelated house on Palethorp Street near Louden when they heard gunfire.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
SARASOTA, Fla. - The chances of Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez's filling a much-needed rotation spot in April were dimmed by his drab spring performances. Gonzalez's immediate fate - a trip to the minors - was all but sealed Wednesday when he did not board a bus to Ed Smith Stadium with his Phillies teammates. The $12 million import from Cuba was scratched from his third scheduled Grapefruit League appearance because of right shoulder soreness. Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said Gonzalez could return this week.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Jonathan Pettibone, who was down for 2 weeks in February, walked off the mound adjacent to the short field at the Carpenter Complex and Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez, who has faced major league hitters exactly one time in his life, shortly followed. Behind them was Phillies pitching coach Bob McClure. It was Monday, and McClure reached for a sheet in his back pocket when he was asked if Cole Hamels, also scheduled to throw a side session that morning, was still in line to pitch.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO SIGNS greet customers as they approach the front door of Serrata's Grocery Store in West Oak Lane: "No weapons allowed" and "Do not enter with mask or hoodie. " They sit at eye level - it's impossible to miss them. But a would-be robber ignored both of those warnings Friday and ended up dodging bullets for his brazenness, police said yesterday. Store owner Raul Serrata, 42, said he didn't have time to think when a masked punk entered his corner store, at 75th Avenue and Walnut Lane, with a handgun drawn and demanded money from him about 7:15 Friday night.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A MAN IN North Philadelphia found himself between some rock salt and a hard place last week when someone held him at gunpoint as he cleared snow from the sidewalk, police said yesterday. Daron Stinson, 21, pointed a gun at the 52-year-old man on Diamond Street near Sedgley Avenue around 3 p.m. Thursday, police said. But he didn't demand his wallet or his watch - he wanted his rock salt, police said. And it was all caught on video - by Stinson - who then uploaded the footage to social media as part of an apparent string of prank holdups Stinson filmed and posted on his Instagram account, according to police.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Super Bowl meeting between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks, as you have no doubt heard, matches the highest-scoring offense in the NFL against the defense that allowed the fewest points this season. It is also a matchup between the offense that gained the most yards and the defense that allowed the fewest yards. In the history of the Super Bowl era, those two things have never been the case before in the same game. So, yes, Peyton Manning's offense vs., for want of a better figurehead, Richard Sherman's defense, is the story line that makes the most sense and has garnered the most attention.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN - An armed man selling PCP, or phencyclidine, was arrested by Camden County police on routine patrol Friday night in the city's Gateway neighborhood who witnessed a transaction, police said. PCP, also known as "wet" or "angel dust," has a hallucinogenic effect and has been associated with violent acts. Fernando Perez, 28, of Camden, was charged with unlawful possession of a weapon, certain persons not to have weapons, possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute, and possession with intent to distribute within 500 feet of a park.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Siarhei Baltutski claims he sold at least 100 pieces of military hardware with names like Thermal Eye Renegade 320 and Scorpion thermal weapon sights to pig hunters in his native Belarus. But a federal judge in Philadelphia didn't buy the 41-year-old arms exporter's story and sentenced him Thursday to more than 25 years in prison for violations of federal arms-control and money-laundering laws. Baltutski, a Minsk businessman who pleaded guilty in January, led an international arms network that recruited U.S. straw buyers, including Belarusians living as legal permanent residents in Philadelphia, to purchase military-grade rifle scopes, goggles, and other similar devices for resale on the black market.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
AS THE second World Trade Center fell at 10:28 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, so, too, did the old world order. Almost immediately, a new order arose in its place, in the form of the war on terror, a domestic infrastructure called homeland security, a new kind of military engagement with volatile new enemies, and a heightened surveillance culture in which notions of privacy have also been turned upside down. At least initially, few doubted such actions were necessary to curb terrorism, and even doubters felt the trade-off between, say, civil liberties and government scrutiny was a necessary price.
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