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NEWS
June 11, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
In an unorthodox step, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has picked a retired general to return to duty and become the Army's new chief of staff, senior defense officials said yesterday. The officials said Rumsfeld planned to ask President Bush to nominate retired four-star Army Gen. Peter Schoomaker, 57, who previously headed elite Special Operations forces, to succeed Gen. Eric Shinseki, who retires today, as the Army's top officer. Rumsfeld's choice of a retiree to vault past top active Army generals to head the service and become a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff comes against a backdrop of strained relations between Rumsfeld and the Army, Reuters reported.
SPORTS
September 21, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Army wants you - to help it celebrate the 78 members of its 2005 U.S. Army all-Americans. To do that, the Army is conducting a nationwide tour this year to introduce its selectees. And yesterday, upon its arrival here, Callahan Bright, a senior two-way tackle for Harriton High School, was introduced as such a selectee. Today, Marques Slocum, a massive force as an offensive guard for West Catholic High, will join Bright on a roster chosen from a poll of 400 nominees from across the nation.
SPORTS
October 12, 1996 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers would like to settle its quarterback situation and put coach Terry Shea's West Coast offense into high gear today in its game against Army at Giants Stadium. But to do that, the Scarlet Knights (1-4) must contain the Cadets' wishbone offense. And that might not be easy. Army (4-0) is ranked third in the nation with 323 rushing yards per game, and with six backs who have carried the ball 25 times or more, it can wear down opponents. In addition, Army has a passing game, too. Ronnie McAda, who missed Army's last two games because of an ankle injury but might see time against Rutgers, has completed 16 of 25 passes for 332 yards and one touchdown this season.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John Joseph Levine, 72, of Hatfield Township, a retired job counselor and former Army career man who trained Chinese troops during World War II, died Thursday at Grand View Hospital near Sellersville. Mr. Levine, who was born and educated in Philadelphia, enlisted in the Army in December 1942 and went to China to train troops for fighting in the China-Burma-India Theater. He was an Army platoon sergeant during the war in Korea. Later, he was a rifle instructor in Hawaii and was a noncommissioned leader of a group of marksmen at Fort Knox, Ky. His Army career of more than 20 years ended in Germany as the Berlin Wall was going up. He settled in the Lansdale area and was an employment counselor for the Pennsylvania Job Service.
SPORTS
March 12, 2008 | Daily News Staff Report
Temple will face four schools that were in bowl games last season and have five home games, according to the football schedule released yesterday. The Owls open the season Aug. 29 against Army at West Point (7 p.m.). The home opener at Lincoln Financial Field is Sept. 6 against Connecticut, which narrowly defeated Temple last season on a disputed call. In addition to UConn, the other bowl teams on the schedule are Penn State (Sept. 20), Central Michigan (Oct. 11) and Navy (Nov.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The Reagan administration is considering a plan to put a four-star admiral - rather than an Army general as previously planned - in charge of U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf, the Washington Post reported today. The campaign to strengthen the Navy's role in the gulf by altering command rotation had been under way before last week's shooting down of an Iranian airliner by the cruiser USS Vincennes, officials told the Post, but the incident added impetus to the plan. Under the proposed change, Vice Adm. Henry Mustin, deputy chief of naval operations for plans, policy and operations would become the next head of the U.S. Central Command, officials told the newspaper.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
By David B. Grusky When President Obama announced that 40,000 troops now in Iraq would come home by the end of the year, the initial excitement quickly turned to concern that our struggling economy couldn't easily handle the shock of an additional 40,000 job seekers. Although we should, of course, care deeply about returning Iraq war veterans, we ought not to think for a moment that adding 40,000 workers to the job-seeking pool will break the back of the economy; it's already broken.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - David Petraeus, the general widely credited with rescuing a failing U.S. war in Iraq, retired from the Army yesterday with a word of warning: Coming budget cuts must not impair the U.S. military's ability to fight a full range of conflicts, from major land wars to Iraq-like insurgencies. Petraeus, 58, made clear his concern that political pressures to lighten the nation's debt burden could force the military to retrench in ways that hurt U.S. security and U.S. troops.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Suicides among active-duty soldiers in July more than doubled from June, accelerating a trend throughout the military this year that has prompted Pentagon leaders to redouble efforts to solve a puzzling problem. The Army, which is the only branch of the military that issues monthly press statements on suicides, said that 26 active-duty soldiers killed themselves in July, compared with 12 in June. The July total was the highest for any month since the Army began reporting suicides by month in 2009, according to Lt. Col. Lisa Garcia, an Army spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia doctor who attended college on an ROTC scholarship and then filed for conscientious objector status will not have to serve in the Army, a federal judge ruled yesterday. U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak said an Army review board that rejected Lynda Dianne Reiser's request for discharge had failed to explain its decision that she was not sincere in her anti-war beliefs. An Army chaplain, lay officer and psychiatrist who interviewed the doctor had all found her sincere and recommended that her discharge be approved.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge is considering a defense motion that would bar prosecutors from using the results of blood tests on the excavator operator involved in 2013's building collapse that flattened a Salvation Army thrift store, killing six people. Common Pleas Court Judge Glenn B. Bronson ordered defense lawyer William Davis and Assistant District Attorney Edward Cameron to return to court Thursday, when he might rule. In a hearing Wednesday, Davis argued that police did not have probable cause to order a hospital nurse to test the blood of Sean Benschop as he lay on a gurney shortly after the June 5, 2013, collapse at 2136 Market St. Benschop, 43, and Griffin Campbell, 51, the demolition contractor who hired Benschop, were each charged with six counts of third-degree murder - one for each person killed - and 13 counts of reckless endangerment for each of those injured.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOB HIGGINS is coming home. After 63 years, the remains of the young Fishtown soldier, who was captured in a bloody battle at the height of the Korean War in 1951, will be returned here for proper ceremony and burial. His remains will arrive at Philadelphia International Airport from Hawaii on Thursday. A military escort will accompany the coffin to St. Ephrem Catholic Church in Bensalem for the funeral on Saturday. The escort will then accompany the coffin to Washington Crossing National Cemetery in Newtown, Bucks County, for burial with full military honors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Children are invited to join the Continental Army, see what it was like to be a continental soldier, and learn army essentials Saturday at Valley Forge National Historical Park. First, kids will receive enlistment papers and old-time continental-style cash. They will then learn how to load, fire, and carry a dummy musket just as soldiers did in George Washington's day. Park rangers in full continental uniform will train the young recruits. Join the Continental Army Junior Ranger Program, 11 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Visitor Center at Valley Forge National Historical Park, 1400 N. Outer Line Dr., King of Prussia.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamal Parker and Evan Powell both said the offer was kind of "random. " But neither player was complaining about his first NCAA Division I football scholarship offer. Parker, a junior all-purpose athlete at Camden Catholic, and Powell, a junior linebacker at Cherokee, both received offers this week from Army. Both players said they were contacted by Army assistant coach Orlando Mitjans. "I was very surprised," said Parker, who also was a standout point guard for the Camden Catholic basketball team this season.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LITTLE DID Robert Dixon know when he saw the attractive girl walking past the playground of Edison High School that getting to know her would change his life. Robert was in 11th grade at the time, and he was instantly attracted to the girl as she walked by the playground, her head down, arms loaded with books. He called out a greeting a couple of times, before deciding he'd better introduce himself. She was Hester Eliza Burgess, who was attending Kensington High School, but, more important, and life-altering for both of them, was that she was involved with the Salvation Army.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Gabe Polsky's Red Army is a documentary about hockey - call it a hockumentary, or a puckumentary, if you must. (I must, apparently.) But this madly entertaining account of the Soviets' historic domination of the game - repeatedly winning Olympic gold, then famously losing it to the upstart Americans at the 1980 Winter Games in Lake Placid - is much more than a sports movie. It's about Cold War politics, about national pride, about how we affix our hopes and dreams to athletes and athletic competitions, how we identify with sports and sports identifies us. It is about one charismatic Russian, Vyacheslav Fetisov, whose skating and shooting - and diplomatic - skills have proved remarkable.
SPORTS
February 27, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
GABE POLSKY loves hockey. Got good at it. Played at Yale. Wasn't good enough to play in the NHL, which is just as well. "I can't watch it," he told the Daily News yesterday. "It's chippy and choppy, and they can barely complete three passes in a row. " Polsky likes his hockey fast and fluid, which is part of the reason he wrote and directed the critically acclaimed "Red Army" documentary that opens tomorrow at the Ritz Five in Society Hill. Another reason is he's the son of Russian immigrants who, he said, came to America with "$500 and two suitcases.
SPORTS
January 27, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
MIKE KRZYZEWSKI got his 1,000th career win yesterday, which caused colleague Bob Vetrone Jr., purveyor of all things statistical, to reminisce about the best Big 5 moments he put together a decade ago. Vetrone, aka Boop (follow him on twitter @BoopStats), noted that Krzyzewski's first win in Philly came not as a coach, but as a player. It was Jan. 6, 1968. Coach K was Guard K back then, playing for Bobby Knight at Army against Temple in the first game of Palestra doubleheader (remember those?
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Army narrative describes how Jeffrey F. Zauber, a Cherry Hill native, earned a Distinguished Service Cross for "exceptionally valorous actions" in South Vietnam on Feb. 2, 1969. "While serving as company medic during a mission to relieve a sister unit engaged with an enemy force," Mr. Zauber showed "extraordinary heroism," the June 25, 1969, account reads. "Approaching the combat area, Specialist Zauber's company came under intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2014 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
By the beard of Gandalf the Grey, I swear I was conscious for the entirety of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies , that not a minute of its seemingly endless titular tiff - the rain of flying arrows, the marauding Orcs, the screeching bats, the Elven king Thranduil and his antlered steed, the galloping Wargs and the prosthetic noses of a baker's dozen dwarves, the clang and thwack of computer-generated combatants of every Middle-earthian stripe...
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