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NEWS
June 11, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
In an unorthodox step, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has picked a retired general to return to duty and become the Army's new chief of staff, senior defense officials said yesterday. The officials said Rumsfeld planned to ask President Bush to nominate retired four-star Army Gen. Peter Schoomaker, 57, who previously headed elite Special Operations forces, to succeed Gen. Eric Shinseki, who retires today, as the Army's top officer. Rumsfeld's choice of a retiree to vault past top active Army generals to head the service and become a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff comes against a backdrop of strained relations between Rumsfeld and the Army, Reuters reported.
SPORTS
September 21, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Army wants you - to help it celebrate the 78 members of its 2005 U.S. Army all-Americans. To do that, the Army is conducting a nationwide tour this year to introduce its selectees. And yesterday, upon its arrival here, Callahan Bright, a senior two-way tackle for Harriton High School, was introduced as such a selectee. Today, Marques Slocum, a massive force as an offensive guard for West Catholic High, will join Bright on a roster chosen from a poll of 400 nominees from across the nation.
SPORTS
October 12, 1996 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers would like to settle its quarterback situation and put coach Terry Shea's West Coast offense into high gear today in its game against Army at Giants Stadium. But to do that, the Scarlet Knights (1-4) must contain the Cadets' wishbone offense. And that might not be easy. Army (4-0) is ranked third in the nation with 323 rushing yards per game, and with six backs who have carried the ball 25 times or more, it can wear down opponents. In addition, Army has a passing game, too. Ronnie McAda, who missed Army's last two games because of an ankle injury but might see time against Rutgers, has completed 16 of 25 passes for 332 yards and one touchdown this season.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John Joseph Levine, 72, of Hatfield Township, a retired job counselor and former Army career man who trained Chinese troops during World War II, died Thursday at Grand View Hospital near Sellersville. Mr. Levine, who was born and educated in Philadelphia, enlisted in the Army in December 1942 and went to China to train troops for fighting in the China-Burma-India Theater. He was an Army platoon sergeant during the war in Korea. Later, he was a rifle instructor in Hawaii and was a noncommissioned leader of a group of marksmen at Fort Knox, Ky. His Army career of more than 20 years ended in Germany as the Berlin Wall was going up. He settled in the Lansdale area and was an employment counselor for the Pennsylvania Job Service.
SPORTS
March 12, 2008 | Daily News Staff Report
Temple will face four schools that were in bowl games last season and have five home games, according to the football schedule released yesterday. The Owls open the season Aug. 29 against Army at West Point (7 p.m.). The home opener at Lincoln Financial Field is Sept. 6 against Connecticut, which narrowly defeated Temple last season on a disputed call. In addition to UConn, the other bowl teams on the schedule are Penn State (Sept. 20), Central Michigan (Oct. 11) and Navy (Nov.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The Reagan administration is considering a plan to put a four-star admiral - rather than an Army general as previously planned - in charge of U.S. military operations in the Persian Gulf, the Washington Post reported today. The campaign to strengthen the Navy's role in the gulf by altering command rotation had been under way before last week's shooting down of an Iranian airliner by the cruiser USS Vincennes, officials told the Post, but the incident added impetus to the plan. Under the proposed change, Vice Adm. Henry Mustin, deputy chief of naval operations for plans, policy and operations would become the next head of the U.S. Central Command, officials told the newspaper.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
By David B. Grusky When President Obama announced that 40,000 troops now in Iraq would come home by the end of the year, the initial excitement quickly turned to concern that our struggling economy couldn't easily handle the shock of an additional 40,000 job seekers. Although we should, of course, care deeply about returning Iraq war veterans, we ought not to think for a moment that adding 40,000 workers to the job-seeking pool will break the back of the economy; it's already broken.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - David Petraeus, the general widely credited with rescuing a failing U.S. war in Iraq, retired from the Army yesterday with a word of warning: Coming budget cuts must not impair the U.S. military's ability to fight a full range of conflicts, from major land wars to Iraq-like insurgencies. Petraeus, 58, made clear his concern that political pressures to lighten the nation's debt burden could force the military to retrench in ways that hurt U.S. security and U.S. troops.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Suicides among active-duty soldiers in July more than doubled from June, accelerating a trend throughout the military this year that has prompted Pentagon leaders to redouble efforts to solve a puzzling problem. The Army, which is the only branch of the military that issues monthly press statements on suicides, said that 26 active-duty soldiers killed themselves in July, compared with 12 in June. The July total was the highest for any month since the Army began reporting suicides by month in 2009, according to Lt. Col. Lisa Garcia, an Army spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia doctor who attended college on an ROTC scholarship and then filed for conscientious objector status will not have to serve in the Army, a federal judge ruled yesterday. U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak said an Army review board that rejected Lynda Dianne Reiser's request for discharge had failed to explain its decision that she was not sincere in her anti-war beliefs. An Army chaplain, lay officer and psychiatrist who interviewed the doctor had all found her sincere and recommended that her discharge be approved.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
By Mark Edward Lender Our country just marked the 240th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence with the customary parades, fireworks, and family gatherings that have become American traditions. As welcome as these celebrations are, we should take a few moments to reflect upon the fact that - just 50 miles from Independence Hall, where that momentous document was signed - a modern academic institution is destroying the battlefield where the declaration's lofty ideals were secured by our nation's first soldiers.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
An Army veteran and former Guantanamo Bay guard from Montgomery County has been named one of 25 finalists in a contest that celebrates "the woman behind the uniform. " Erica Walsh, who studies health and physical education at West Chester University and runs her own fitness business, was chosen from about 120 current or former servicewomen nationwide to advance in the Ms. Veteran America competition. Walsh, 29, found out in an email that she read in her car Saturday. "I was speechless," she said.
NEWS
July 3, 2016
Tens of thousands of American lives could be saved each year with a concerted national effort to emulate top military and civilian trauma centers, a panel of medical experts has reported. "It is time for a national goal owned by the nation's leaders: zero preventable deaths after injury," said a committee from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in a report released in the aftermath of the mass shooting in Orlando that killed 49 and injured dozens. Citing the U.S. Army's 75th Ranger Regiment's performance in Afghanistan and Iraq, the report praised the special operations force for its successes in treating combat casualties under difficult conditions while virtually eliminating preventable deaths.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Swiss Army Man is a big existential fart joke. That's good news if you like fart jokes, not so good otherwise. It should be noted, however, that this fearless oddity of an indie, written and directed by Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert and starring Paul Dano and Daniel Radcliffe (the power of Dans!), is propelled by more than mere flatulence. This is a movie about the safe haven of imagination, about loneliness and despair and resilience, about obsession and, um, stalking. It begins on a desert isle, where a lone castaway, Hank (Dano)
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
CARLISLE, Pa. - There's no doubt that Earnest Knocks Off, son of a Sioux chief, lies buried among nearly 200 children in the Indian cemetery here. The question is, where? He seems to have two separate headstones. Other grave markers on the grounds of what was the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, now the Army War College, contain partial or misspelled names, wrong dates of death, and missing birth dates. The supporting paper archive is incomplete. Now, as the Army begins to meet tribal demands to return the remains of boys and girls who died in a harsh, turn-of-the century experiment in forced assimilation, both sides face a dilemma: When century-old records are lacking and even headstones can be unreliable, how to fully account for the dead?
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Supreme Court has refused to block a judge's order requiring the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office to surrender three cellphones for examination by lawyers in litigation from the deadly 2013 Salvation Army collapse. In a one-sentence ruling Friday, the high court unanimously rejected the district attorney's request to stay a May 23 order by Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein punishing prosecutors for not turning over the cellphones. The ruling is final, and the District Attorney's Office on Monday released a statement saying it would comply with Bernstein's order.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Best friends since grade school, Neshaminy High School seniors Parker Minotti and Tyler Marks decided in middle school what they would do when they grew up. Join the military. The two 18-year-olds stayed true to their dream. Marks is headed to the Marines. Minotti has signed up for the Army and will enter the U.S. Military Academy at West Point after a year at the Academy's prep school. They were among 11 Neshaminy students honored Thursday for their decision to join the military after graduation, with seven going into the Army and four into the Marines.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | JEFF GAMMAGE, STAFF WRITER|, CHARLES FOX, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
ROSEBUD, S.D. - Lila Kills In Sight grew up not knowing that she had a relative buried in far-off Pennsylvania, a boy who went away to boarding school and never came back. His loss simply wasn't discussed in her home. Only recently did she learn of her tie to the child who died at the Carlisle Industrial Indian School - news she found as staggering as if she discovered she'd lost a family member in the Holocaust. "Now I have all kinds of questions," Kills In Sight, 45, said during an interview on the Rosebud Sioux reservation in South Dakota.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
ROSEBUD, S.D. - Her hands didn't shake when she took the microphone, nor did her voice tremble when she spoke. Yufna Soldier Wolf had waited a long time to speak to these people from the Army, these men and women from the federal government, come all the way to this Indian reservation on the far southern edge of South Dakota. It was their turn to listen. Across the room stood a portrait of a boy, Soldier Wolf's great-uncle. He was 14 when he died at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania, after being taken from his Northern Arapaho family and tribe.
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