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Art Collector

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NEWS
January 10, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter L. "Billy" Wolf, 93, of Rydal, an executive in his family's packaging business, an art collector, and founder of Prints in Progress, an art enrichment program for disadvantaged children, died Sunday at his home. Mr. Wolf was raised in Jenkintown and graduated from Cheltenham High School. After attending the University of Virginia, he joined the family company Wolf Bros. in Philadelphia, working in sales and marketing. He developed specialty boxes and bags for department stores and patented a hand-locking clasp for shopping bags that became the firm's signature.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Henry Plumer McIlhenny, chairman of the board of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and world-renowned patron of the arts, died yesterday. He was 75 and lived in Center City. He suffered a stroke last week after undergoing heart surgery the previous week at Hahnemann University Hospital. McIlhenny, who had been chairman of the museum since 1976, served as curator of Decorative Arts there from 1935 to 1964, continuing a family tradition in the arts. His father, John Dexter McIlhenny, served as president of the museum from 1920 until his death in 1925, and his mother, Frances Plumer McIlhenny, also was active in the arts.
NEWS
December 3, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vivian Orleans Potamkin, 87, art collector, philanthropist, soldier in the war against breast cancer and "everyday mother," died Nov. 24 of breast cancer at her home in Center City. With her husband, mortgage banker Meyer "Pat" Potamkin, she owned one of the country's most important collections of American art. The Potamkins in 2000 made a significant gift to the Philadelphia Museum of Art of seven oil paintings and one watercolor by members of the artist group known as the Eight.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip I. Berman, a well-known collector of sculpture and other contemporary art, has been nominated to become chairman of the board of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The board of trustees is scheduled to vote Oct. 18 on the nomination, forwarded by the selection committee. Berman is expected to be elected unopposed, several board sources said. Berman, 74, an Allentown multi-millionaire who made his fortune as owner of both a trucking business and the Hess's Inc. retail chain, has been a trustee of the museum since 1980.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Plumer McIlhenny, the world-famous art collector, respected civic leader and renowned social lion whom pop artist Andy Warhol once described as "the only person in Philadelphia with glamour," died yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital of complications resulting from heart surgery. He was 75. Mr. McIlhenny, chairman of the board of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, owned a superb collection of 19th-century French and English art and antiques that caused him to be ranked among the most important American art collectors.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | By Marlyn Margulis, Special to The Inquirer
What does a collector do when his collection becomes too large for his home? Faced with such a situation, Alfred De Martini opened a museum. "Other men like to play golf; that's their hobby," De Martini said. "But I enjoy 'playing' museum. " It is an art museum, with a rather broad definition for the word art. For instance, among the exhibits are not only photographs, sculpture, paintings and macrame wall hangings, but also an antique Singer sewing machine, chairs by three designers, a model of a brownstone apartment building, several soup tureens and mementos of the European travels of De Martini and his wife, Alberta.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philadelphia collector, artist, and philanthropist Linda Lee Alter has donated the lion's share of her collection of art by women - about 400 works - to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, academy officials announced Monday. The works, in a variety of media, span most of the 20th century as well as the last decade in American art. Some of the artists - who include Louise Bourgeois, Kiki Smith, Joan Brown, Viola Frey, Ana Mendieta, Christina Ramberg, and Beatrice Wood - are not currently represented in the academy collection.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came from all over the world, jetting in from Paris and Italy and Texas. They also came by bus from Philadelphia, forking out $15 for a round- trip ride and a box lunch. Some came with heavy pockets, ready to buy marble statues for their front hallways in Palm Beach or Louis XVI furniture for galleries on the Upper East Side. And some came with only spare change by international art standards, eager to watch items from Henry P. McIlhenny's Philadelphia estate being scattered about the world, hoping - just hoping - that maybe they could bring a pillow cushion or snuffbox back to Philadelphia for only a few hundred or a few thousand dollars.
NEWS
October 8, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert Barnes. A name that, 50 years after his death, still lives . . . in infamy. Who was he? Why do people say such scabrous things about him? And what's with the convoluted will he left? These questions about the region's preeminent art collector are at the heart of the debate over whether to move the financially strapped Barnes Foundation collection from a leafy Lower Merion street to Philadelphia's "museum mile. " Yet people have been arguing about Barnes for over a century.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Art collector Leonard E.B. Andrews is offering a $10,000 reward in an effort to track down burglars who cleaned out his Willistown, Chester County, offices last week, taking computer disks with all his personal and business records. Among those records was a detailed history of Andrew Wyeth's controversial "Helga" pictures, which Andrews bought in 1986, then sold three years later to a Japanese collector. The burglary of the Andrews Foundation and Andrews Management Corp., at 699 Sugartown Rd., occurred Thursday night or early Friday, police and Andrews said.
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NEWS
August 29, 2013
Just no room for this inn Even though Inga Saffron's suggestions would improve the Dranoff tower, the building will, alas, remain a behemoth squeezed uncomfortably into its space along the Schuylkill ("Suggestions for One Riverside," Aug. 23). As Saffron pointed out, normally there is a street separating buildings of this size from the waterfront. The mistake was made in 2010 by allowing developer Carl Dranoff this zoning designation, and there should still be a way to challenge this.
NEWS
July 23, 2012
Herbert Vogel, 89, a retired New York postal worker who, with his wife, Dorothy, created one of the world's most unlikely - and most significant - collections of modern art, then bequeathed much of it to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, died Sunday at a nursing home in New York City. His death was confirmed by Anabeth Guthrie, a spokeswoman for the National Gallery. The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. In 1962, when Mr. Vogel and Dorothy Hoffman were married, they went to Washington on their honeymoon and spent several days visiting the National Gallery and other museums.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The general public gets its first views of the Center City iteration of the Barnes Foundation on Saturday, but cultural leaders and donors to the new building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway saw, and feted, their handiwork Friday night. About 875 philanthropists, politicians, business leaders and others went through the galleries, and then promenaded down a garden path to an enormous tent set up on the Parkway for dinner. Tickets went for $5,000 a head - tables for $50,000 - and sold out quickly.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat, 90, who built a billion-dollar fortune with her late husband's Argentine cement companies and became a leading art collector, died Saturday in her luxury apartment in Buenos Aires. Ms. Fortabat became one of Argentina's wealthiest women at age 54, when her second husband, Alfredo Fortabat, 27 years her senior, died in 1976. At the time, Argentina had just fallen under a dictatorship with close ties to the country's wealthy business elites, and the Loma Negra cement businesses flourished through government contracts with the military junta.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Kathryn Canavan, For The Inquirer
Manayunk turns into a tent city filled with art this weekend with hundreds of booths selling everything from drop earrings to couch paintings. When the 22d annual Manayunk Arts Festival opens Saturday morning, the neighborhood's Main Street will be closed to traffic - except foot traffic. Organizers say they expect the usual crowd of nearly 200,000, despite gas prices and the sluggish economy. They hope two trends will buoy attendance - more families skipping expensive vacations and more people looking for free events.
NEWS
April 3, 2011
Wanamaker's Pursuit In 1911, a (fictional) Philadelphia department store heir, Nathan Wanamaker, travels to Paris on a learning trip to become a buyer for his family's store. Invited to an over-the-top party thrown by Paul Poiret, the self-proclaimed "King of Fashion," Nathan is smitten by the joie-de-vivre lifestyle. But when - uh-oh! - it's time to come home, what to do? This world premiere is commissioned by the Arden Theatre Company from playwright Rogelio Martinez. At the Arden Theatre Company, through May 22. The Credeaux Canvas Kevin Bunin's play involves love, intimacy, and friendship - and the betrayal of all that - as three struggling New York friends swindle an art collector.
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 16th-century portrait was a bargaining chip in the spring of 1943. Friedrich and Louise Gutmann, a Jewish couple from a prominent banking family, hoped to trade it for their lives. Adolf Hitler's art dealer ordered the painting, along with others from the famous Gutmann collection, shipped to Germany in exchange for the couple's safe passage from the Netherlands to Italy. But the Nazis reneged on the deal. The Gutmanns ended up in concentration camps, where they died, and their 1509 painting - Portrait of a Young Man by the German artist Hans Baldung Grien - mysteriously disappeared on the way to Berlin.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philadelphia collector, artist, and philanthropist Linda Lee Alter has donated the lion's share of her collection of art by women - about 400 works - to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, academy officials announced Monday. The works, in a variety of media, span most of the 20th century as well as the last decade in American art. Some of the artists - who include Louise Bourgeois, Kiki Smith, Joan Brown, Viola Frey, Ana Mendieta, Christina Ramberg, and Beatrice Wood - are not currently represented in the academy collection.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
Rudolf Leopold, 85, who assembled Austria's largest private art collection, including works allegedly stolen by the Nazis, died Tuesday in Vienna. Mr. Leopold is credited with assembling the country's largest and most important private art collection, which includes more than 5,000 works by artists such as Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. But the collection, which draws art aficionados from around the world, has been criticized in recent years by Austria's Jewish community and others who say it contains works seized by the Nazis that should be returned to their rightful owners or heirs.
NEWS
November 27, 2005 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the heart of this resort town's historic district, 1,200 miles from its former home in Pennsylvania, a stunning building facade is getting star billing as an icon of 1930s art deco design. "It's a masterwork of its kind," said art collector Micky Wolfson Jr., who bought the intricate terra-cotta artifact for the unique museum bearing his name. But in Norristown, where that gem of commercial architecture welcomed patrons to the Norris Theater for 52 years, there remains only a parking lot. In March 1983, the borough lost the window grille facade and six remarkable stained-glass windows when the remainder of the cultural treasure was razed to make way for a McDonald's.
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