CollectionsArt Critic
IN THE NEWS

Art Critic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Former New York Times chief art critic Hilton Kramer, 84, died Tuesday. His wife, Esta, said he had had a blood disease. He had been in an assisted-living facility in Harpswell, Maine. Mr. Kramer started as an art critic in the early 1950s and joined the Times in 1965 as art-news editor. He became chief art critic in 1973. He left the newspaper in 1982 and became founding editor of the New Criterion magazine, a monthly journal that critiques the arts and other topics. - AP  
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Robert Hughes, 74, the eloquent, combative art critic and historian who lived with operatic flair and wrote with a sense of authority that owed more to Zola or Ruskin than to his own century, died Monday at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx. He died after a long illness, said his wife, Doris Downes. With a Hemingwayesque build and the distinctively rounded vowels of his native Australia, Mr. Hughes became as familiar a presence on TV as in print, over three decades for Time magazine, where he was chief art critic and often a traditionalist scourge in an era when art movements fractured into unrecognizability.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis Leon, 65, formerly of Philadelphia, a sculptor, art critic and teacher, died Thursday at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Oakland, Calif. He died unexpectedly a few hours after back surgery, and an autopsy was being performed to determine the cause of death. Mr. Leon was the art critic at The Inquirer from 1959 to 1962, and taught at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art (now the University of the Arts) from 1959 until 1970. He was director of its sculpture department from 1967 to 1970.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By RICK NICHOLS
Jesse Helms, art critic, has won himself another round, this time cowing virtually the entire Senate into joining him in making the walls of publicly funded galleries safe for all-American art. He got the senators to go along with banning federal arts dollars for anything "obscene or indecent," especially things sadomasochistic or homoerotic. And, museums could forget tax money if their art insulted anyone's race, creed, sex, national origin, handicap, age or religion. That last part is new territory for Jesse Helms, civil rights opponent.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Budding art critic Felicia, 4, eyes poster art from children in Project Rainbow, publicizing Meridian Bank's fund-raising campaign for homeless services. Works by artists Nicole Giangiordano (center) and Heather Gibson (right) will be among art the featured on calendars sold by the bank. Lending a hand, too, is Meridian's Delaware Valley division president, David Bright.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Sozanski, 77, art critic for The Inquirer, who over three decades became a major figure in describing and documenting the city's cultural transformation from regional byway to the national main stage, died suddenly Monday, April 14, in Gladwyne. The cause of death has not been determined. Whether writing about America's first sculptor, William Rush, or art from Korea's Joseon dynasty, or the way John Cage's musical "scores" looked on the page, Mr. Sozanski always sought to directly engage the art and provide his readers with an utterly independent critical judgment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Participants in the annual exhibitions organized by the Cheltenham Art Center are spurred by a special incentive: Not only are their works seen by the thousands of visitors to the suburban center's show, but the artists also have a chance at the top prize - inclusion in the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. This year, to mark the 45th anniversary of the Cheltenham Art Center, the museum is mounting an exhibition of 15...
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Sculptor Isamu Noguchi - who provided Philadelphia with its most controversial art object since Claes Oldenberg's Clothespin - died yesterday in New York at age 84. Noguchi's massive "Bolt of Lightning" structure at the base of the Ben Franklin Bridge has been the source of constant praise and bitter criticism since its construction in 1984. Noguchi, born in Los Angeles in 1904, died at New York University Medical Center of heart failure after a short illness early yesterday.
NEWS
September 16, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cyril Gardner, 96, of Wallingford, an artist and a founder of the Wallingford Arts Center, died Sept. 9 at home. In 1956, an art critic wrote that Mr. Gardner had painted "everybody who is anybody. " Over his long career, he painted portraits of the rich and famous, including Mrs. Milton Hershey, wife of the chocolate baron; the children of Walter Annenberg; the children of political columnist Drew Pearson; and members of the du Pont dynasty. His son Edward Gardner said his father often drew portraits of ordinary people as well.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin and Samantha Melamed, CLASSICAL MUSIC AND BEER CRITICS
S teuart and Michelle Pincombe are spending a year living in a trailer, traveling through the United States and Canada, spreading the word about the power classical music can have in surprising places. Tuesday night the couple stopped at Dock Street Brewery at 50th and Baltimore Streets, where Steuart played Baroque cello while an attentive standing-room-only crowd quenched its thirst for Bach and beer chosen to somehow match each other. Our critics weigh in on the evening.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Thomas Hine, CONTIBUTING ART CRITIC
'Why?" is a question every aspiring journalist is taught to ask - and answer. Yet, in my current incarnation as an art critic, when I find myself confronting a work and asking "Why?"
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brother Daniel Burke, 89, former president of La Salle College and founder-director of the La Salle University Art Museum, died Saturday, Nov. 14, from cardiac problems at De La Salle Hall, a nursing home for members of the Christian Brothers in Lincroft, N.J. Born in Pittsburgh, he received bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees, all in English, from Catholic University of America. He taught English at West Catholic High School and elsewhere before joining the faculty at La Salle, now a university, in 1957 as an assistant professor of English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | Reprinted from Thursday's editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'With your big eyes and your big lies . . . ," Lana Del Rey purrs over the end titles of Tim Burton's Big Eyes . It's a sultry, albeit hardly subtle coda to a wondrously strange true story about art and heartbreak, intellectual property theft, and the subjugation of women. Specifically, the subjugation of one Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) by husband Walter Keane (Christoph Waltz), who in the 1960s claimed his wife's paintings of saucer-eyed waifs as his own. Signed simply "Keane" (often followed by a copyright symbol)
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Sozanski, 77, art critic for The Inquirer, who over three decades became a major figure in describing and documenting the city's cultural transformation from regional byway to the national main stage, died suddenly Monday, April 14, in Gladwyne. The cause of death has not been determined. Whether writing about America's first sculptor, William Rush, or art from Korea's Joseon dynasty, or the way John Cage's musical "scores" looked on the page, Mr. Sozanski always sought to directly engage the art and provide his readers with an utterly independent critical judgment.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, curators at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts began planning an all-female art exhibition. Organizers hoped it would facilitate a debate about whether feminism is still needed in modern art, but they weren't sure audiences would find the topic worthy of debate. Then came Ken Johnson, a New York Times art critic who in only six sentences sparked an impassioned controversy that has played out for months on his Facebook page, arts blogs, an online petition and, on Sunday evening, a sold-out panel discussion at PAFA on the very topic the curators wanted to discuss all along.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Murray Dessner, 77, a tall and handsome painter whose canvases were suffused with light and color and who deployed a keen and supportive critical judgment to the benefit of generations of students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, died Saturday in Philadelphia. His wife of 27 years, Linda, said the cause was cancer. Mr. Dessner was born in South Philadelphia, attended the academy in the 1960s, and began teaching there in 1970, becoming one of the most respected and beloved faculty members until illness forced his retirement at the end of 2011.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Robert Hughes, 74, the eloquent, combative art critic and historian who lived with operatic flair and wrote with a sense of authority that owed more to Zola or Ruskin than to his own century, died Monday at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx. He died after a long illness, said his wife, Doris Downes. With a Hemingwayesque build and the distinctively rounded vowels of his native Australia, Mr. Hughes became as familiar a presence on TV as in print, over three decades for Time magazine, where he was chief art critic and often a traditionalist scourge in an era when art movements fractured into unrecognizability.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Former New York Times chief art critic Hilton Kramer, 84, died Tuesday. His wife, Esta, said he had had a blood disease. He had been in an assisted-living facility in Harpswell, Maine. Mr. Kramer started as an art critic in the early 1950s and joined the Times in 1965 as art-news editor. He became chief art critic in 1973. He left the newspaper in 1982 and became founding editor of the New Criterion magazine, a monthly journal that critiques the arts and other topics. - AP  
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2011
TAKE YOUNGMAN (PLEASE!) Think of Jayson Musson as the Sacha Baron Cohen of the art world and Hennessy Youngman as an art critic Ali G (see youtube.com/user/Youngman). "The Grand Manner," Musson's exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts through Feb. 5, features Youngman's criticism of their great works via cellphone tour. Youngman will do one of his typically hysterical presentations at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at PAFA, 128 N. Broad St. It's free. 215-972-7600, pafa.org. OTHERWORLDLY DANCE Chunky Move's riveting, 60-minute work "Connected" launches Dance Celebration's 29th season, "Out of this World.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|