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Art Deco

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NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
NEWS
January 2, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
From compact studio flats to two-story penthouses with full staircases, two bedrooms, and 2 1/2 baths, the more than 20 floor plans of 1930 Chestnut offer a variety of living styles in a spanking-new environment. The 22-story, historic building (circa 1924), once home to medical offices and Aldine Trust Co., was recently gutted and reconstructed into a residential rental property with 144 apartments and two floors of proposed retail space. Selected units are distinguished by long entrance halls, center-island kitchens, breakfast bars, powder rooms, laundry rooms, skylights and clerestories, lofts and loft-bedroom suites, dining rooms, and dens.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
In its heyday, the Astor Theater in Reading was a fashionable 1920s art deco palace playing host to the Marx Brothers, the Three Stooges and Bob Hope. Today, a decade has passed since the last symphony concert filled the 2,200-seat theater; the music has been replaced by dusty cobwebs, peeling paint and the musty chill of neglect and disuse. When Lou Perugini and Newton A. Perrin walk the empty aisles, however, they look beyond the decay and envision the beauty that once was - and that can be again.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | By David Iams, FOR THE INQUIRER
Two major winter sales next weekend will evoke the evolution of furnishings from the Victorian era to art deco. On the way will be a few curios and collectibles. The Victorian furniture will be one of the features at Ron Rhoads' two-day midwinter antiques auction next weekend at the Kimberton Fairgrounds outside Phoenixville. It will be sold at the second session, beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday. Among the major items are a massive three-piece bedroom suite with a 9-foot queen-size bed; a rare walnut 30-drawer beveled glass spool cabinet incongruously capped with a small mantel clock; marble top washstands, and a Victorian Greek revival center table in rosewood.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Esther Carroll patrolled the auction and flea market trail, buying and selling. Mostly, she just bought. Eventually her acquisitions exceeded the capacity of the garage at the house at 161 Hartford Rd. in Delran, that she shares with her husband, John. Soon they were scattered around the yard as well. Eventually, township officials got tired of the sight of the possession- filled property and told the Carrolls to get rid of the stuff. Today and tomorrow they will do just that, at an auction at the house to be conducted by Michael Chiaccio, a free-lance auctioneer who normally works at S&S Auctions in Repaupo.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a lot more than gangsters in Miami. It's an art town, too. "Streamline Dreamtime" is the theme of this year's Miami Beach Art Deco Weekend Festival, Jan. 14 to 17, scheduled along Ocean Drive in the area that encompasses the city's famous '30s "streamline" hotels that are the essence of art deco: the Cardoza, the Carlyle, the Leslie, the Cavalier, the Waldorf Towers and the Park Central, among others. The area is a federally recognized 20th-century historic district, and it contains the greatest concentration of art deco architecture in the world.
NEWS
July 20, 1996
Every time an old building is refurbished in Center City, there's a chance work crews will make a discovery like one the other week at the Jones New York store at 17th and Walnut Streets. And what a find it was: Under a workaday storefront was revealed a four-story art deco facade with terra-cotta pictures of sailing ships, dating back to the Roaring Twenties. By rights, such a building front should be preserved, and preferably restored to its original condition and showcased.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1986 | By Patricia Leigh Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
He looks like Sam Spade, dressed in his antique calf-length black coat and department-store fedora. But Paul Fuhrman is not in quest of hapless Maltese birds of prey. His mission is to deliver us from contemporary furniture. He has been stockpiling his arsenal in a former Studebaker garage in Easton. His warehouse is a deco heaven, a veritable supermarket containing more than 300 specimens of American art deco furniture - what he calls "the largest selection in the universe. " His timing couldn't be better.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the stalwarts of South Jersey auction houses is the Elmer Auction Co., named after the town in the heart of Gloucester County farmland, but actually located in Monroeville. Every Friday, beginning about 4:30 p.m., proprietors Lana and David Dubin sell furniture, tools, household goods and collectibles. Occasionally Elmer Auction also holds special sales of higher quality goods. Just such a sale is scheduled for Monday at noon, one of many New Year's Day auctions. In addition to oak and mahogany furniture, and art deco items, there is a lot of good porcelain, including Limoges, Wedgwood, Roseville, Rookwood and occupied Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1986 | By Patricia Leigh Brown, Inquirer Design Writer
"In setting out your sideboard, you must study neatness, convenience, and taste; as you must think that ladies and gentlemen that have splendid and costly articles, wish to have them seen and set out to best advantage. . . . " - Robert Roberts, The House Servant's Directory, 1827 There are hundreds of types of furniture in this world, and the sideboard is only one of them. Yet, upon close observation, the sideboard - a kind of table containing drawers and cupboards specifically used in the dining room - represents a compact history of changes in domestic manners and taste.
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NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Historians will debate whether Ralph Bencker was a modernist or Art Deco architect. Like so many practitioners in the 1920s and '30s, he combines the sensibility of both in his work, which can be found throughout Philadelphia. But his best-known design, the N.W. Ayer Building on Washington Square, now the Ayer condos, is distinguished by its emphasis on sculptural embellishment. Bencker's decoration is visible before you open the front door of the 14-story limestone tower. Completed in 1929, the building was designed to serve as the headquarters for Ayer, which was the city's premier advertising agency in the pre- Mad Men era. The door's dark surface is encrusted with a checkerboard of bronze bas-reliefs featuring a vignette of the skills used in the advertising trade.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This has been a heartbreaking year for Philadelphia's historic cultural venues. Chestnut Street's Boyd Theater, the glittering survivor of Hollywood's golden age, is being hacked apart and turned into a development site. Developers have been granted permission by the Nutter administration to do the same to South Street's Royal Theater and Broad Street's Blue Horizon, as long as they retain the facades as two-dimensional tokens of their former glory. That makes it all the more amazing that one important member of this grand theater crew has managed to escape the wrecking ball: the Uptown Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The emerald-cut diamond, in all of its hot, white engagement-ring splendor, has some sparkling new competition this wedding season. Colored stones, art deco rings inspired by vintage pieces, and glitzy halo settings are giving the once-coveted classic a run for its money. "We are seeing a lot of new trends emerging in the diamond industry," said Harvey Rovinsky, president of Philadelphia-based Bernie Robbins. "Rounded and square diamonds are by far still the most popular shape, but brides are being influenced by celebrities.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Suzette Laboy, Associated Press
MIAMI - With its sizzling beaches and steamy nightlife, it's no wonder Miami is a top vacation spot for snowbirds, spring breakers, international tourists, and passengers heading out on cruises from Florida ports. More than 13 million people visited the city in 2011, according to the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau. Getting past sticker shock, though, can be difficult for anyone on a budget. Expect to pay $20 for a burger at trendy restaurants, the same for cocktails. Just getting past the velvet ropes of a popular nightclub can run $300.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | By David Iams and FOR THE INQUIRER
In the online catalog for its "town and country" sale Saturday, Kamelot Auctions candidly describes one of the 800 lots to be offered as "bizarre. " While not going to that extreme in their sales descriptions, at least three other auction houses will offer items over the next few days that could be called "distinctive. " Kamelot's explicitly bizarre item is "an antique horn-and-brass dresser, smoke or pen stand," about 11 by 13 inches, with what appears to be a small mirror hung between the two horns.
NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
NEWS
November 6, 2009 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There comes a point in the life of our workhorse industrial buildings when we stop seeing them for the marvels they perform, and soon after that, we stop seeing them altogether. In Philadelphia, which abounds with the unused relics of a mighty industrial past, it's all too easy to forget that these are the structures that made the city modern. Such has been the sad fate of the art deco steam plant behind 30th Street Station, built in 1929 by the architects of the rail terminal, with the same progressive ideas and design skill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Fall is fashion's most exciting time of year. But it also raises the most questions: What's the in shoe? Will belts be important? Are we still in a dress season? So, to guide us, I asked some of New York's hottest designers: Isaac Mizrahi, the man who chic-ified Target and stars in the brand-new Bravo reality series The Fashion Show; Jason Wu, best known for his soon-to-inhabit-the-Smithsonian inaugural gown for first lady Michelle Obama; and Tracy Reese, the delicate hand behind Plenty and her girly self-named label.
REAL_ESTATE
August 30, 2009 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber FOR THE INQUIRER
Eric Reisman went house-hunting because he wanted a dog. "I really just wanted a backyard," he said. "The house just happened to be attached to it. " Reisman had rented apartments in Chestnut Hill and Fort Washington for years, but on their initial outing, his real estate agent introduced him to quaint Ambler and he fell in love with the first house he saw, a sweet Victorian with an ample backyard that could be his on a limited budget. "I saw great potential in renovating that house," said Reisman, a copywriter who ran his own business for 25 years before joining United Healthcare in the spring.
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