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Art Education

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LIVING
October 27, 1993 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"What do you see?" asks Noreen Scott Garrity, pointing to the painting. Hands shoot up. Voices call out. "I see a boy sleeping and someone throwing up on him. " "A boy sleeping and a monster beating on his head. " After some gentle prodding, someone suggests that it is a sleeping boy and his guilty conscience. A guilty conscience, muses Garrity. "If you had to draw your conscience, how would you do it?" "It would have blue hair, a blue face, three toes and three fingers.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen-year-old David Jones, who'll be a senior this fall at West Philadelphia High, was not surprised when he learned he had been named Philadelphia's next youth poet laureate. "It was super cool," he said after receiving the honor during a City Hall ceremony in front of his family, friends, and city officials including Mayor Nutter. "Honestly, I kind of expected it. " Jones, who has been writing poetry for years, was calm and confident as he recited one of his poems, Birds , an homage to Maya Angelou's famous work.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending an often testy and sometimes distant 25-year coexistence, the Barnes Foundation will merge with the foundation established by the estate of Violette de Mazia, Albert C. Barnes' longtime colleague. The Violette de Mazia Foundation - whose sole purpose has been to promulgate and support art education based on the formalist pedagogical principles of Barnes, de Mazia, and the philosopher John Dewey - will form the core of the Barnes-de Mazia Education Program, to be based at the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Cortes
Horticulture and art are related fields, but in bonsai, they are one. As curator of the bonsai collection at Longwood Gardens, Mary Allinson makes use of her art education and her childhood experience on her family's farm. She is teaching two sessions in bonsai at Longwood this month that already are filled. Bonsai is the art of growing plants as dwarf, picturesque specimens in containers. The technique originated in China and was developed further in Japan.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul B. Flick, 73, a retired Glassboro State College (now Rowan College of New Jersey) art professor and Mickleton resident, died Thursday when he was hit by a car near his home. "He was deeply involved with art and teaching art at Glassboro State College," said Burton Wasserman, a senior art professor at Rowan since 1960. "It was central to his life. " While there, the bulk of Mr. Flick's work consisted of teaching art- appreciation courses to non-art majors. "It is a special challenge to make art interesting to students who aren't art majors," said George Neff, chairman of Rowan College's art department.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
J   ILL MARKOVITZ, 40, of Fairmount, is founder and director of Philly Art Center, with locations in Queen Village and Fairmount. The centers hold art classes, after-school programs and summer camps for kids as young as 18 months, as well as workshops for adults.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My background is art education, and it was always my dream to have an arts center. We just celebrated 10 years in Fairmount, and [Queen Village] opened in 2011.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deborah Warner, 64, a textile artist and faculty member at the Moore College of Art and Design from 1970 until she retired in 2010, died of lung cancer Saturday, July 7, at her home in East Falls. Ms. Warner was chair of the Moore textile design department for several years and dean of the college from 1990 to 1993. Inquirer art critic Edward J. Sozanski noted in a 1997 review that "fiber art has been transformed in recent years by imagination, technical adaptation, and willingness to move beyond utility and traditional forms.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | By Bernice Z. Heron, Special to The Inquirer
The Chamber Players of America Ltd. is seeking classical musicians and listeners to participate in a chamber music conference Feb. 17-20 at Eagle Lodge conference center in Lafayette Hill. Cellist Jeanne Kelly will be music director of the event. The Chamber Players was formed to bring together professional and amateur musicians in an environment suited for well-matched ensemble play while providing other leisure and recreational activities, according to Ira Gutzeit, president.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have a bachelor's degree in marketing, but I'm seeking a career change in a fine-arts-related field. I am enrolled at Kutztown University to obtain certification in art education. What's the future for art teachers, where are the best opportunities and what are the salary levels? Will art-teaching positions be more limited due to preference for math, science and computers? Will my age (28) and my marketing degree limit my employment opportunities? - J.R., Forty Fort, Pa. The job outlook for art teachers in Pennsylvania is better than ever, due to a new state requirement of two credits in arts or humanities in secondary schools.
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NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventeen-year-old David Jones, who'll be a senior this fall at West Philadelphia High, was not surprised when he learned he had been named Philadelphia's next youth poet laureate. "It was super cool," he said after receiving the honor during a City Hall ceremony in front of his family, friends, and city officials including Mayor Nutter. "Honestly, I kind of expected it. " Jones, who has been writing poetry for years, was calm and confident as he recited one of his poems, Birds , an homage to Maya Angelou's famous work.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SALLY GUARIGLIA believes that eyes are portals to a person's true self, so when she first saw Savannah Harvey's sea-green peepers, she knew that the sophomore from Moore College of Art & Design was a kindred soul. "Look at those eyes!" Guariglia, 75, exclaimed while she and Harvey worked on Guariglia's memory book of digital photographs at the South Philadelphia Older Adult Center, on East Passyunk Avenue near Dickinson Street. Harvey is among Moore College art-education majors teaching digital photography to 16 senior citizens at the center and helping them handcraft memory books with their photos.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending an often testy and sometimes distant 25-year coexistence, the Barnes Foundation will merge with the foundation established by the estate of Violette de Mazia, Albert C. Barnes' longtime colleague. The Violette de Mazia Foundation - whose sole purpose has been to promulgate and support art education based on the formalist pedagogical principles of Barnes, de Mazia, and the philosopher John Dewey - will form the core of the Barnes-de Mazia Education Program, to be based at the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A painter deeply influenced by Albert E. Sandecki, whose name was once familiar in South Jersey and beyond, is helping organize the first retrospective of the late artist's work. Opening Sept. 18 at the Markheim Arts Center in Haddonfield, the show "is kind of a farewell," says Jim Repenning, who owns Repenning Fine Arts in Audubon. Sandecki died last year, at 78, after a long battle with cancer. He made his reputation with moody, oil-on-canvas landscapes of Maine. Bateman's Hill , perhaps his best-known painting, is owned by the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
J   ILL MARKOVITZ, 40, of Fairmount, is founder and director of Philly Art Center, with locations in Queen Village and Fairmount. The centers hold art classes, after-school programs and summer camps for kids as young as 18 months, as well as workshops for adults.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My background is art education, and it was always my dream to have an arts center. We just celebrated 10 years in Fairmount, and [Queen Village] opened in 2011.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE ART stays. The School Reform Commission voted unanimously last night to oppose the sale of an esteemed art collection, prompting surprise and joy among advocates for the artwork. The resolution would have authorized the sale of 60 paintings that have been locked away since about 2004. The proceeds would have gone to the general fund and not toward an education fund, which was a sticking point with SRC member Feather Houstoun. She said she received many phone calls asking that if the art had to be sold that any proceeds should go toward art education.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Deborah Ann Deery, 49, of Philadelphia, an artist and college teacher whose love of nature helped shape her artistic vision, died of pancreatic cancer Monday, Aug. 19, at Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Deery was appointed in May as an assistant professor at Moore College of Art & Design in Center City, where she had numerous roles throughout her career. "Whatever Deb was doing, she was always an ambassador for Moore," said Moore president Cecelia Fitzgibbon. "It is an understatement to say that she occupies a special place in our hearts; she will be truly missed.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SKINNED, headless rabbit hung upside down above a wood table, its feet bound and its arms outstretched as if it were racing toward the ground. The table was adorned with lavender baby's breath flowers, a glass of white wine and the ingredients used in Osteria's signature dish, casalinga , or rabbit with polenta: kosher salt, butter, rosemary, sage and pancetta . For fine diners at the Spring Garden restaurant, this is dinner. For visiting art teacher Deva Watson and her four students from Southwest Leadership Academy Charter School, in the Paschall section of Southwest Philly, this is art. Food linked with art is one of Watson's out-of-the-box ideas that excite her bosses, nonprofit officials and, most significantly, her students.
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