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Art Education

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LIVING
October 27, 1993 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"What do you see?" asks Noreen Scott Garrity, pointing to the painting. Hands shoot up. Voices call out. "I see a boy sleeping and someone throwing up on him. " "A boy sleeping and a monster beating on his head. " After some gentle prodding, someone suggests that it is a sleeping boy and his guilty conscience. A guilty conscience, muses Garrity. "If you had to draw your conscience, how would you do it?" "It would have blue hair, a blue face, three toes and three fingers.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Cortes
Horticulture and art are related fields, but in bonsai, they are one. As curator of the bonsai collection at Longwood Gardens, Mary Allinson makes use of her art education and her childhood experience on her family's farm. She is teaching two sessions in bonsai at Longwood this month that already are filled. Bonsai is the art of growing plants as dwarf, picturesque specimens in containers. The technique originated in China and was developed further in Japan.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul B. Flick, 73, a retired Glassboro State College (now Rowan College of New Jersey) art professor and Mickleton resident, died Thursday when he was hit by a car near his home. "He was deeply involved with art and teaching art at Glassboro State College," said Burton Wasserman, a senior art professor at Rowan since 1960. "It was central to his life. " While there, the bulk of Mr. Flick's work consisted of teaching art- appreciation courses to non-art majors. "It is a special challenge to make art interesting to students who aren't art majors," said George Neff, chairman of Rowan College's art department.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Deborah Ann Deery, 49, of Philadelphia, an artist and college teacher whose love of nature helped shape her artistic vision, died of pancreatic cancer Monday, Aug. 19, at Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Deery was appointed in May as an assistant professor at Moore College of Art & Design in Center City, where she had numerous roles throughout her career. "Whatever Deb was doing, she was always an ambassador for Moore," said Moore president Cecelia Fitzgibbon. "It is an understatement to say that she occupies a special place in our hearts; she will be truly missed.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deborah Warner, 64, a textile artist and faculty member at the Moore College of Art and Design from 1970 until she retired in 2010, died of lung cancer Saturday, July 7, at her home in East Falls. Ms. Warner was chair of the Moore textile design department for several years and dean of the college from 1990 to 1993. Inquirer art critic Edward J. Sozanski noted in a 1997 review that "fiber art has been transformed in recent years by imagination, technical adaptation, and willingness to move beyond utility and traditional forms.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | By Bernice Z. Heron, Special to The Inquirer
The Chamber Players of America Ltd. is seeking classical musicians and listeners to participate in a chamber music conference Feb. 17-20 at Eagle Lodge conference center in Lafayette Hill. Cellist Jeanne Kelly will be music director of the event. The Chamber Players was formed to bring together professional and amateur musicians in an environment suited for well-matched ensemble play while providing other leisure and recreational activities, according to Ira Gutzeit, president.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have a bachelor's degree in marketing, but I'm seeking a career change in a fine-arts-related field. I am enrolled at Kutztown University to obtain certification in art education. What's the future for art teachers, where are the best opportunities and what are the salary levels? Will art-teaching positions be more limited due to preference for math, science and computers? Will my age (28) and my marketing degree limit my employment opportunities? - J.R., Forty Fort, Pa. The job outlook for art teachers in Pennsylvania is better than ever, due to a new state requirement of two credits in arts or humanities in secondary schools.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
Every spring for 35 years, the School District of Philadelphia has mounted its annual spring art show at the museum of the Philadelphia Civic Center. Featuring 1,500 pieces of art work representing students from kindergarten through senior high at 200 schools, the show is a moving and impressive display of creative energy and talent. It is the largest show of its kind in the nation - a perennial jewel in the tarnished crown of public education. But under budget cuts that will be made unless the bailout promised by the mayor and the president of City Council materializes, "Young Artists 1994" will be the district's last student exhibition.
NEWS
September 27, 2003
As the drive to move the Barnes Foundation from Lower Merion to Philadelphia gathers momentum, one worthy group could get passed by the parade. That would be Barnes students - those who over the decades have used this great art collection as the basis for an art education, just as Albert C. Barnes intended. Yes - and this bears repeating - the Barnes Foundation is an art collection and a school. (Don't call it a museum.) Students have studied there, at low-cost tuition, since Barnes was alive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A painter deeply influenced by Albert E. Sandecki, whose name was once familiar in South Jersey and beyond, is helping organize the first retrospective of the late artist's work. Opening Sept. 18 at the Markheim Arts Center in Haddonfield, the show "is kind of a farewell," says Jim Repenning, who owns Repenning Fine Arts in Audubon. Sandecki died last year, at 78, after a long battle with cancer. He made his reputation with moody, oil-on-canvas landscapes of Maine. Bateman's Hill , perhaps his best-known painting, is owned by the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
J   ILL MARKOVITZ, 40, of Fairmount, is founder and director of Philly Art Center, with locations in Queen Village and Fairmount. The centers hold art classes, after-school programs and summer camps for kids as young as 18 months, as well as workshops for adults.   Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My background is art education, and it was always my dream to have an arts center. We just celebrated 10 years in Fairmount, and [Queen Village] opened in 2011.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE ART stays. The School Reform Commission voted unanimously last night to oppose the sale of an esteemed art collection, prompting surprise and joy among advocates for the artwork. The resolution would have authorized the sale of 60 paintings that have been locked away since about 2004. The proceeds would have gone to the general fund and not toward an education fund, which was a sticking point with SRC member Feather Houstoun. She said she received many phone calls asking that if the art had to be sold that any proceeds should go toward art education.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Deborah Ann Deery, 49, of Philadelphia, an artist and college teacher whose love of nature helped shape her artistic vision, died of pancreatic cancer Monday, Aug. 19, at Methodist Hospital. Mrs. Deery was appointed in May as an assistant professor at Moore College of Art & Design in Center City, where she had numerous roles throughout her career. "Whatever Deb was doing, she was always an ambassador for Moore," said Moore president Cecelia Fitzgibbon. "It is an understatement to say that she occupies a special place in our hearts; she will be truly missed.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SKINNED, headless rabbit hung upside down above a wood table, its feet bound and its arms outstretched as if it were racing toward the ground. The table was adorned with lavender baby's breath flowers, a glass of white wine and the ingredients used in Osteria's signature dish, casalinga , or rabbit with polenta: kosher salt, butter, rosemary, sage and pancetta . For fine diners at the Spring Garden restaurant, this is dinner. For visiting art teacher Deva Watson and her four students from Southwest Leadership Academy Charter School, in the Paschall section of Southwest Philly, this is art. Food linked with art is one of Watson's out-of-the-box ideas that excite her bosses, nonprofit officials and, most significantly, her students.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
She doesn't look like a revolutionary. Now in her early 70s, Linda Lee Alter is diminutive, gracious, and soft-spoken, with a fringe of white hair and rimless glasses. During an interview in her light-filled Center City apartment, she was dressed simply and conservatively: charcoal sweater vest, pearl-gray blouse, black slacks, flats. Yet with one bold gesture, Alter has transformed Philadelphia into a must-visit city for anyone interested in the work of female artists. Alter spent a quarter-century assembling an impressive collection: approximately 400 works made during the last four decades by more than 150 American women.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
  When Justin Mitchell and Karina Restrepo created the Mi Cumbia Spa on 17th Street, they didn't hire a decorator. Mitchell, an artist, approached the task as Albert C. Barnes would have evaluated a piece of art. To appreciate Mitchell's approach - and that of so many others who have studied the Barnesian method - you must understand Barnes. Imagine you have never seen or heard of the Mona Lisa or its creator. When you do get to view the painting at the Louvre, you admire the artist's use of color, the lines or shapes he has created, the illusion of distance, and the marvelous light he installed on the subject's face and breast and in the background.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Alan M. "Mike" Kriegsman, 84, a critic for the Washington Post whose prose style earned the first Pulitzer Prize for dance coverage, died Aug. 31 of heart ailments at his home in Chevy Chase, Md. The death was confirmed by Suzanne Carbonneau, a dance critic and historian. In an interview, Mikhail Baryshnikov, the Soviet-born dancer and former artistic director of the American Ballet Theatre, called Mr. Kriegsman "one of the best writers" on dance. He said that Mr. Kriegsman was an accomplished pianist whose educational background in music "brought an intelligent approach to writing about music in choreography.
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