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Art History

NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George Cameron Vail is a whirlwind in disguise. You might not know that he exists but for the persistent, colorful stories spun by those who have worked with him - successful artists, a big-name Camden County prosecutor, and the former editor of a once thriving chain of South Jersey weeklies. We found him, this retired art professor, at his home in Audubon, where he still makes a daily trek to the carriage-house studio in his backyard to paint landscapes and portraits, to carve guitars and dulcimers from tiger maple and mahogany, and to restore antique art. "I don't usually do interviews," said Vail, 82, a twinkle in his eyes.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Find me an art gallery with an exhibit of Haitian paintings, and I am nearly giddy with pleasure. The colors, the inventiveness, the exuberance, the poignancy - all of it delights me anew with each exposure. It was a trip to Haiti more than a dozen years ago that ignited my passion for Haitian art, which (now, as then) has an international reputation. Early last year, however, a trip to the Dominican Republic made me feel like a jilting lover. Over time, rationality has prevailed.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When artist, author, and Catholic brother Michael O'Neill McGrath walks around Camden just after dawn, he keeps his eyes wide open - for subjects to sketch. Some of the vivid illustrations inspired by McGrath's early morning walks will be featured in a Stedman Gallery show called "Visions of Camden. " The show will include canvases by the painter William Hoffman; photographs by Camilo Vergara and Ken Hohing; vintage Camden postcards; and artifacts unearthed at a downtown construction site.
NEWS
January 1, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While studying city planning at Harvard University, Abraham A. Davidson had difficulty drawing perspectives correctly. In his autobiography on a Temple University website, Dr. Davidson wrote that a Harvard professor discouraged his thoughts of graduate studies in architecture but, he recalled, "I might be allowed to continue in city planning. "I thought city planning was beset by politics, while art history was something 'purer.' "Little did I then realize . . . " Dr. Davidson, 76, of Center City, who retired as an art history professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art in May after a 43-year career there, died of sepsis Sunday, Dec. 18, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Marjorie K. Sieger, a former educator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art whose field of expertise was Japanese art, died Saturday. She was 73 and lived in East Falls. Though a specialist in Japanese art, she was equally at ease lecturing and teaching Islamic, Indian, Southeast Asian and Chinese art. A museum spokesperson said, "As the museum's first coordinator of public programs for non-Western art, she enriched the lives of thousands of visitors with her great enthusiasm and knowledge of cultures throughout the world.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Grilikhes, 70, who built a University of Pennsylvania library from a fledgling facility into a respected source of information, died Saturday of breast cancer at her home in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. She also was an award-winning poet and novelist who taught at the University of the Arts. As director of Penn's Annenberg School for Communication Library from the late 1960s until she retired in the early 1990s, Ms. Grilikhes "built a real library," said Larry Gross, deputy dean of the Annenberg School.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Sabol, an art history major and football star in college who combined those two passions to help transform the family business, NFL Films, into a modern mythmaking marvel, died Tuesday at 69. Mr. Sabol had been battling brain cancer since 2011. An inoperable tumor had been discovered just days after his father, Ed, the NFL Films founder, was elected to Pro Football's Hall of Fame. A lifelong Philadelphia-area resident who never lost his accent or his boyish idealism, Mr. Sabol forever changed the way Americans view their sports.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wherever Michelle Rein went, Taz, her black Chihuahua, went, too. Taz was trained to nudge her mistress and offer emotional support when bouts of disabling pain washed over her. On Friday, at the Bryn Mawr train station, Rein reacted as one who considers a dog as family. Taz had become agitated and strayed onto the tracks, and Rein stepped off the platform. Before she could cradle the dog and stand up, the train was on her, a witness said. Rein, 44, of Center City, a student of Islamic art and architecture, died instantly of massive injuries, police said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Barnes Foundation has selected Thomas Collins, head of the resurgent PĂ©rez Art Museum in Miami, to be its new chief executive and president, the museum announced Wednesday. A native of the Philadelphia area, Collins, 46, will assume the post in March at an institution that is now in its third year on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He succeeds Derek Gillman, who guided the Barnes from 2006 to 2013, when the Barnes successfully, if sometimes contentiously, moved its spectacular collection of impressionist and early modernist art from its longtime home in Merion to Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Siduri Beckman, 14, swoons over George Eliot's Silas Marner with a passion many girls her age reserve for, say, One Direction boy-band phenom Harry Styles. "I loooove that book," she said, sitting in the auditorium at her school, Julia R. Masterman. Correction. She loves Eliot's Middlemarch first, then Silas Marner . But Philadelphia's first youth poet laureate - Mayor Nutter announced her title this week - has never read Harry Potter. If her tastes seem a little serious, Beckman herself is not. She explains that her parents, Karen and Michael Beckman of West Philadelphia, named her Siduri after the "bartender to the gods" in the Epic of Gilgamesh . The literary Siduri knows the secret of everlasting life, Beckman says.
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