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Art History

NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Find me an art gallery with an exhibit of Haitian paintings, and I am nearly giddy with pleasure. The colors, the inventiveness, the exuberance, the poignancy - all of it delights me anew with each exposure. It was a trip to Haiti more than a dozen years ago that ignited my passion for Haitian art, which (now, as then) has an international reputation. Early last year, however, a trip to the Dominican Republic made me feel like a jilting lover. Over time, rationality has prevailed.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Marjorie K. Sieger, a former educator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art whose field of expertise was Japanese art, died Saturday. She was 73 and lived in East Falls. Though a specialist in Japanese art, she was equally at ease lecturing and teaching Islamic, Indian, Southeast Asian and Chinese art. A museum spokesperson said, "As the museum's first coordinator of public programs for non-Western art, she enriched the lives of thousands of visitors with her great enthusiasm and knowledge of cultures throughout the world.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Grilikhes, 70, who built a University of Pennsylvania library from a fledgling facility into a respected source of information, died Saturday of breast cancer at her home in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. She also was an award-winning poet and novelist who taught at the University of the Arts. As director of Penn's Annenberg School for Communication Library from the late 1960s until she retired in the early 1990s, Ms. Grilikhes "built a real library," said Larry Gross, deputy dean of the Annenberg School.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Haverford College will wait more than a year to get its first choice for a new leader, Lafayette College president Daniel H. Weiss. The prestigious Main Line liberal arts college on Tuesday announced that Weiss, an art history scholar who has led Lafayette since 2005, would become Haverford's 14th president in July 2013. Weiss, 54, asked for the time to finish his eighth year with Lafayette and oversee projects he had started, including the design and building of a new center for global education and a new arts campus.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By Happy Craven Fernandez
"Why have there been no great women artists?" Linda Nochlin asked this explosive question in 1971 and changed the study of art history. Then and now, her seminal essay, published in Art News, posed a question that still provokes debate. Do the names Peeters, Neel, Frankenthaler and Lin - all accomplished women artists - trip off your tongue like Van Gogh, Picasso, Eakins and Calder? If challenged to name the top 10 best-known or contemporary artists, how often would you include a woman on the list?
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I have been looking for a job in graphic arts for more than two years. I suspect my resume is not taken seriously because I am deaf. I know this is indirect discrimination, but don't know what to do about it. I have an excellent portfolio and good references. How can I get through the door? I have a bachelor's degree in advertising design and am interested in going to graduate school for a master's in art history or fine arts administration. Which colleges have these programs?
NEWS
February 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Walker McCoubrey, 86, an emeritus professor in the department of art history at the University of Pennsylvania, died of kidney failure Tuesday at his home in University City. Dr. McCoubrey was awarded a Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching just four years after joining Penn's faculty in 1964. That same year he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to study in London. He had previously studied in Paris on a Fulbright Fellowship. He was also recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A preliminary plan for the sale of artworks in the collection of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary should be announced by the end of March, seminary officials say. The seminary is home to about 200 paintings, including six portraits of clerics by Thomas Eakins and others by Alice Neel and Philip Pearlstein. The Inquirer reported Monday that the seminary was considering sales from its collection to help defray the costs of consolidation and renovation of its Wynnewood campus on City Avenue.
NEWS
March 14, 2012
Francis X. Gildea, 69, formerly of Radnor, a Vietnam War veteran and shopping mall manager, died Saturday, March 10, of complications from cancer at Waverly Heights, a retirement community in Gladwyne. A native of Lackawanna County, Mr. Gildea graduated from Scranton Preparatory School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton. From 1966 to 1968, he served in the Army and completed a tour of duty, including jungle operations in Vietnam. After his discharge, he was an analyst for the National Security Agency in Washington, where he met his future wife, Joyce Asher.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone visiting the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts hoping to see both of its Edward Hopper paintings will be disappointed. The academy sold Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken (1934) in December for $40.5 million to raise funds for other art. Only his Apartment Houses (1923) remains. A trip to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary on City Avenue to view its six Thomas Eakins oils will also disappoint. In March, the seminary announced the portraits will be sold to fund renovations.
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