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NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Swan had a remarkable eyewitness source for her 1989 book, The Lost Children: A Russian Odyssey. Her first husband was Alfred P. Swan, a Red Cross worker who helped guide 800 Russian children far from the revolutionary chaos of St. Petersburg, starting in 1918. Alfred Swan, her music history professor at Swarthmore College, was the prime source for her master's thesis and doctoral dissertation at the University of Pennsylvania. Decades later, the book was based on those papers.
NEWS
January 1, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While studying city planning at Harvard University, Abraham A. Davidson had difficulty drawing perspectives correctly. In his autobiography on a Temple University website, Dr. Davidson wrote that a Harvard professor discouraged his thoughts of graduate studies in architecture but, he recalled, "I might be allowed to continue in city planning. "I thought city planning was beset by politics, while art history was something 'purer.' "Little did I then realize . . . " Dr. Davidson, 76, of Center City, who retired as an art history professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art in May after a 43-year career there, died of sepsis Sunday, Dec. 18, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George Cameron Vail is a whirlwind in disguise. You might not know that he exists but for the persistent, colorful stories spun by those who have worked with him - successful artists, a big-name Camden County prosecutor, and the former editor of a once thriving chain of South Jersey weeklies. We found him, this retired art professor, at his home in Audubon, where he still makes a daily trek to the carriage-house studio in his backyard to paint landscapes and portraits, to carve guitars and dulcimers from tiger maple and mahogany, and to restore antique art. "I don't usually do interviews," said Vail, 82, a twinkle in his eyes.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Find me an art gallery with an exhibit of Haitian paintings, and I am nearly giddy with pleasure. The colors, the inventiveness, the exuberance, the poignancy - all of it delights me anew with each exposure. It was a trip to Haiti more than a dozen years ago that ignited my passion for Haitian art, which (now, as then) has an international reputation. Early last year, however, a trip to the Dominican Republic made me feel like a jilting lover. Over time, rationality has prevailed.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Marjorie K. Sieger, a former educator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art whose field of expertise was Japanese art, died Saturday. She was 73 and lived in East Falls. Though a specialist in Japanese art, she was equally at ease lecturing and teaching Islamic, Indian, Southeast Asian and Chinese art. A museum spokesperson said, "As the museum's first coordinator of public programs for non-Western art, she enriched the lives of thousands of visitors with her great enthusiasm and knowledge of cultures throughout the world.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexandra Grilikhes, 70, who built a University of Pennsylvania library from a fledgling facility into a respected source of information, died Saturday of breast cancer at her home in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia. She also was an award-winning poet and novelist who taught at the University of the Arts. As director of Penn's Annenberg School for Communication Library from the late 1960s until she retired in the early 1990s, Ms. Grilikhes "built a real library," said Larry Gross, deputy dean of the Annenberg School.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toward the end of her tenure as superintendent of the Philadelphia School District, Constance E. Clayton received a visit from the leader of another well-known city institution. Unaware of Clayton's lifelong interest in art, Robert Montgomery Scott, then president and chief executive of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, asked her to join the board of trustees, hoping to mine her expertise in education and diversity issues. Since that day over 20 years ago, museum officials say, Clayton has used her board position to help expand the museum's audience and collection, with a persistence characteristic of her years with the district.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Haverford College will wait more than a year to get its first choice for a new leader, Lafayette College president Daniel H. Weiss. The prestigious Main Line liberal arts college on Tuesday announced that Weiss, an art history scholar who has led Lafayette since 2005, would become Haverford's 14th president in July 2013. Weiss, 54, asked for the time to finish his eighth year with Lafayette and oversee projects he had started, including the design and building of a new center for global education and a new arts campus.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of Lafayette College in Easton will become Haverford College's 14th president, but he won't start the job for over a year, Haverford officials announced Tuesday. Dan Weiss, who has been president of Lafayette since 2005, was approved by Haverford's Board of Managers on Saturday, following a national search that began last fall. He starts at the 1,200-student liberal arts college in July 2013, which allows him to complete his eighth year of presidency at Lafayette, Haverford said.
NEWS
October 27, 2006 | By Happy Craven Fernandez
"Why have there been no great women artists?" Linda Nochlin asked this explosive question in 1971 and changed the study of art history. Then and now, her seminal essay, published in Art News, posed a question that still provokes debate. Do the names Peeters, Neel, Frankenthaler and Lin - all accomplished women artists - trip off your tongue like Van Gogh, Picasso, Eakins and Calder? If challenged to name the top 10 best-known or contemporary artists, how often would you include a woman on the list?
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