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NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
LAURA ARAUJO had her whole life ahead of her. Then it was all around her. Clothes, photographs, jewelry, all the worldly belongings of the 23-year-old college graduate were packed in bags and dumped near an abandoned house in North Philadelphia. Laura was in one of them. "She was placed in a trash bag and then was folded into a blanket and ultimately stuffed into a duffel bag," Homicide Unit Capt. James Clark said yesterday. Araujo, a New York native who graduated last year from the Art Institute of Philadelphia, was discovered by a trash-picker about 5:30 a.m. Monday on 3rd Street near Susquehanna Avenue following a "brutal attack" that likely occurred four to eight hours earlier, Clark said.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
JEREMIAH JAKSON was a lousy security guard. He wasn't good at casing robbery victims, either. The 22-year-old Mantua resident was fired last month from AlliedBarton Security Services "due to performance reasons," the company said last night. So he decided last weekend to rob Laura Araujo, 23, a recent graduate of the Art Institute of Philadelphia who was living in the same rooming home on 40th Street near Brown, police said. Jakson, who has at least four aliases and prior arrests on robbery, theft and gun charges, figured that Araujo had money because she drove a 2011 Toyota RAV4.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IN THE WEEKS leading up to Laura Araujo's slaying, Jeremiah Jakson's life seemed to be spiraling out of control. Or he was on the cusp of greatness. It depended on the day and the hour, but it was all on display on Jakson's Facebook page, a constant barrage of selfies, street cliches and grandiose delusions. The spotlight-grabbing narcissist is the polar opposite of Araujo, 23, a shy college grad who never wanted much attention. "Im a good dude at heart but im done being a good dude," Jakson wrote on June 26. Jakson, 22, was a security guard with AlliedBarton Security Services, but was fired last month for performance reasons.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
The union representing 100 instructors at the Art Institute of Philadelphia announced yesterday that it had successfully negotiated its first contract at the school and had won minimum raises of 9 1/2 percent over two years. A ratification vote on the tentative pact is scheduled for March 3. The teachers became affiliated with District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in March. The new group is expected to get a local union number today.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
Creativity blossomed larger than a white water lily at this spring's end-of-year student fashion shows, where young designers sent versions of thrift-store chic and 1960s mod looks down their runways. Moore College of Art & Design senior Amanda Davis showed two collections, among the evening's highlights. Davis' urban-prep women's wear featured lettered sweaters and knee-length pleated skirts; it was voted most saleable. Her out-of-this-world evening wear, inspired by outer space, featured a bell-sleeved electric sheer gown that could outdo J.Lo.
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Mario Malatesta, 76, a longtime instructor at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his home in Center City. For three decades, starting in the 1950s, Mr. Malatesta also worked as a staff or freelance commercial illustrator for a number of major retailers in Philadelphia, New York and Chicago. A versatile craftsman with a keen eye for perspective, he produced stylish line drawings that highlighted the attractiveness and utility of everyday objects, from living-room furnishings to kitchen appliances.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Administrators and faculty at the Art Institute of Philadelphia face one of the toughest design problems in their history. And it isn't pretty. Some 100 instructors at the school have affiliated with a labor union and are asking for a contract in plain, artless black and white. There has been one job action already - when 90 percent of the faculty boycotted the traditional end-of-term meeting with the Institute's president in December - and the faculty's chief negotiator says there's a "possibility" another job action will occur if a contract isn't signed by March.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
YOUR negative portrayal of the Art Institute of Philadelphia ("Colleges that Profit, Students Who Don't," March 25) is far outweighed by the successful and satisfactory experiences of more than 12,000 graduates. For 40 years, the Art Institute has offered opportunities for students desiring degrees that can lead to rewarding careers in applied and creative arts. Unlike traditional colleges, we track and publish placement statistics. Most recent data shows 87.6 percent of all 2009 Art Institute graduates were working in a field related to their program of study within six months of graduation.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bob Koffler's abstracts are about feelings. In a recent series of 15 oil-on-linen and oil-on-canvas paintings, Koffler, who works out of his studio in Cheltenham, depicted how he felt walking through the Himalayan Mountains, as he did in 1988. The paintings, inspired by Buddhist imagery, are now on view at a faculty show at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, where Koffler teaches figure drawing, painting, perspective, art history, anatomy, graphic design and advertising design.
LIVING
March 18, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
School assembly. Lindsey, a cute tween redhead, takes stage behind microphone. Applause. Lindsey: "Today I'm going to talk about Patty. " Pan to Patty, who smiles timidly from behind glasses. Lindsey, matter of factly: "Patty's best characteristics? She's stupid. Stupid and ugly. " Patty grimaces. Lindsey: "Look at her. Greasy hair, dirty fingernails. It makes me want to vomit. " Pan to devastated Patty. Flashes on screen: "If you wouldn't say it in person, why say it online?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
JEREMIAH JAKSON was a lousy security guard. He wasn't good at casing robbery victims, either. The 22-year-old Mantua resident was fired last month from AlliedBarton Security Services "due to performance reasons," the company said last night. So he decided last weekend to rob Laura Araujo, 23, a recent graduate of the Art Institute of Philadelphia who was living in the same rooming home on 40th Street near Brown, police said. Jakson, who has at least four aliases and prior arrests on robbery, theft and gun charges, figured that Araujo had money because she drove a 2011 Toyota RAV4.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
IN THE WEEKS leading up to Laura Araujo's slaying, Jeremiah Jakson's life seemed to be spiraling out of control. Or he was on the cusp of greatness. It depended on the day and the hour, but it was all on display on Jakson's Facebook page, a constant barrage of selfies, street cliches and grandiose delusions. The spotlight-grabbing narcissist is the polar opposite of Araujo, 23, a shy college grad who never wanted much attention. "Im a good dude at heart but im done being a good dude," Jakson wrote on June 26. Jakson, 22, was a security guard with AlliedBarton Security Services, but was fired last month for performance reasons.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
LAURA ARAUJO had her whole life ahead of her. Then it was all around her. Clothes, photographs, jewelry, all the worldly belongings of the 23-year-old college graduate were packed in bags and dumped near an abandoned house in North Philadelphia. Laura was in one of them. "She was placed in a trash bag and then was folded into a blanket and ultimately stuffed into a duffel bag," Homicide Unit Capt. James Clark said yesterday. Araujo, a New York native who graduated last year from the Art Institute of Philadelphia, was discovered by a trash-picker about 5:30 a.m. Monday on 3rd Street near Susquehanna Avenue following a "brutal attack" that likely occurred four to eight hours earlier, Clark said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seeds of Meei-Ling Ng's future life as an artist and urban farmer in Philadelphia were planted early, and far away, in the village of Lim Chu Kang, in a rural corner of Singapore. With three siblings, she grew up on a five-acre farm, where the family grew orchids, raised ducks, turkeys, chickens, and pigs, and pets - cats, dogs, rabbits, parrots - were plentiful. "It was heaven for us," recalls Ng, pronounced ung , who smiles wistfully at the memory of her grandmother's rambutan, mango, coconut, and jackfruit trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Just before Temple's Class of 2014 walked across the Liacouras Center stage Thursday morning, Betsy Manning shot stills of their shoes for Twitter, Flickr, and posterity. No pump - or toe - was turned away, because Manning's work has little to do with surnames Blahnik or Louboutin and everything to do with documenting the seniors' final show of self-expression as college students. "In the last five years, shoes worn at graduation have gotten so much more radical," said Manning, who has worked as the Temple University photographer for 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Most of the windows were broken. There were holes in the floors. The sense of an abandoned, unlovely, and unloved place was palpable. But when two young, newly married artists stepped inside this hulking home in West Philadelphia in 1975, they saw something else. "I not only saw potential - I knew that someday we would truly come to love this house," Deborah Gross Zuchman remembers. Today, this four-story twin home, vintage 1892, is the belle of their University City neighborhood, at once grand, graceful, and slightly wild.
FOOD
February 28, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Vetri venturing up Things are looking up at Vetri - Marc Vetri and Jeff Benjamin's tiny flagship restaurant at 1312 Spruce St. It is expanding upstairs, taking over the apartment that for decades has benefited from the aromas that wafted up not only from Vetri but from such gems as predecessors Two Quails, Le Bec-Fin, Chanterelles, and Ciboulette. The opening, pegged for May, will also mean Sunday dinner at Vetri, something that the restaurant has not offered in its 15-plus years.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The residential portion of the 17-story Beaux Arts-style Avenue of the Arts building at Broad and Chestnut Streets is being sold for an undisclosed amount. MRP Residential, of Washington, and Principal Real Estate Investors, of Des Moines, Iowa, said they had purchased 176,000 square feet of the building at 1338-48 Chestnut St. and will renovate the space as 220 rental apartments. While the buyers declined to disclose the amount they will pay, sources say the sale price would be in the range of $175 to $200 per square foot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 7, Philadelphia video artist Joshua Mosley will have his first show ever in New York. He's making quite an entrance: His work will be part of the Whitney Museum of American Art's 2014 Biennial, the prestigious survey exhibition that runs through May 25. He's not the only one. While Philadelphia has, over the years, sent a handful of works up I-95 to Manhattan for contemporary American art's big dance, this year's exhibition includes an...
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art will announce Wednesday that it has successfully completed a five-year, $54 million campaign to endow 29 staff positions across the full range of museum departments, from painting and sculpture to digital technology. The campaign began in 2008 when H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, then chairman of the museum's board of trustees, and his wife, Marguerite, offered a $27 million grant and challenged donors to match it, million for million, for the right to endow and name the positions.
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