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NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
The union representing 100 instructors at the Art Institute of Philadelphia announced yesterday that it had successfully negotiated its first contract at the school and had won minimum raises of 9 1/2 percent over two years. A ratification vote on the tentative pact is scheduled for March 3. The teachers became affiliated with District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in March. The new group is expected to get a local union number today.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
Creativity blossomed larger than a white water lily at this spring's end-of-year student fashion shows, where young designers sent versions of thrift-store chic and 1960s mod looks down their runways. Moore College of Art & Design senior Amanda Davis showed two collections, among the evening's highlights. Davis' urban-prep women's wear featured lettered sweaters and knee-length pleated skirts; it was voted most saleable. Her out-of-this-world evening wear, inspired by outer space, featured a bell-sleeved electric sheer gown that could outdo J.Lo.
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Mario Malatesta, 76, a longtime instructor at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his home in Center City. For three decades, starting in the 1950s, Mr. Malatesta also worked as a staff or freelance commercial illustrator for a number of major retailers in Philadelphia, New York and Chicago. A versatile craftsman with a keen eye for perspective, he produced stylish line drawings that highlighted the attractiveness and utility of everyday objects, from living-room furnishings to kitchen appliances.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Administrators and faculty at the Art Institute of Philadelphia face one of the toughest design problems in their history. And it isn't pretty. Some 100 instructors at the school have affiliated with a labor union and are asking for a contract in plain, artless black and white. There has been one job action already - when 90 percent of the faculty boycotted the traditional end-of-term meeting with the Institute's president in December - and the faculty's chief negotiator says there's a "possibility" another job action will occur if a contract isn't signed by March.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
YOUR negative portrayal of the Art Institute of Philadelphia ("Colleges that Profit, Students Who Don't," March 25) is far outweighed by the successful and satisfactory experiences of more than 12,000 graduates. For 40 years, the Art Institute has offered opportunities for students desiring degrees that can lead to rewarding careers in applied and creative arts. Unlike traditional colleges, we track and publish placement statistics. Most recent data shows 87.6 percent of all 2009 Art Institute graduates were working in a field related to their program of study within six months of graduation.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bob Koffler's abstracts are about feelings. In a recent series of 15 oil-on-linen and oil-on-canvas paintings, Koffler, who works out of his studio in Cheltenham, depicted how he felt walking through the Himalayan Mountains, as he did in 1988. The paintings, inspired by Buddhist imagery, are now on view at a faculty show at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, where Koffler teaches figure drawing, painting, perspective, art history, anatomy, graphic design and advertising design.
LIVING
March 18, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
School assembly. Lindsey, a cute tween redhead, takes stage behind microphone. Applause. Lindsey: "Today I'm going to talk about Patty. " Pan to Patty, who smiles timidly from behind glasses. Lindsey, matter of factly: "Patty's best characteristics? She's stupid. Stupid and ugly. " Patty grimaces. Lindsey: "Look at her. Greasy hair, dirty fingernails. It makes me want to vomit. " Pan to devastated Patty. Flashes on screen: "If you wouldn't say it in person, why say it online?
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amy Aldridge was bent over at the waist, sweaty and exhausted. In each hand, the 21-year-old soloist with the Pennsylvania Ballet clutched an edge of her tutu's frothy white tulle while she gulped for air. Nutcracker audiences at the Academy of Music rarely see the Sugar Plum Fairy like this. But thanks to an unusual project undertaken by students at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, visitors to the Pennsylvania Ballet's Web site - http://www.paballet.org - should be able to peek behind the scenes of The Nutcracker to see Aldridge rehearsing the role.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2004 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The art world turns its attention back to Norristown today as the second - and, most likely, decisive - hearing on the future of the financially troubled Barnes Foundation opens in ornate Courtroom A of the Montgomery County Orphans' Court. The Barnes case "is a biggie," said Ildiko DeAngelis, director of museum studies at George Washington University and a former assistant general counsel at the Smithsonian Institution. "A lot of people are very worried about this generally," she said.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An effort by the Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial to expand into a building near its South Philadelphia complex has run into serious difficulties, forcing an expensive alternative installation of an imminent exhibition and threatening an anticipated capital fund-raising campaign. Fleisher signed an agreement of sale to buy the Achille A. Ingenito Funeral Home in the 700 block of Christian Street in August last year. The $250,000 sale was supposed to close at the end of March. It didn't.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Most of the windows were broken. There were holes in the floors. The sense of an abandoned, unlovely, and unloved place was palpable. But when two young, newly married artists stepped inside this hulking home in West Philadelphia in 1975, they saw something else. "I not only saw potential - I knew that someday we would truly come to love this house," Deborah Gross Zuchman remembers. Today, this four-story twin home, vintage 1892, is the belle of their University City neighborhood, at once grand, graceful, and slightly wild.
FOOD
February 28, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Vetri venturing up Things are looking up at Vetri - Marc Vetri and Jeff Benjamin's tiny flagship restaurant at 1312 Spruce St. It is expanding upstairs, taking over the apartment that for decades has benefited from the aromas that wafted up not only from Vetri but from such gems as predecessors Two Quails, Le Bec-Fin, Chanterelles, and Ciboulette. The opening, pegged for May, will also mean Sunday dinner at Vetri, something that the restaurant has not offered in its 15-plus years.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The residential portion of the 17-story Beaux Arts-style Avenue of the Arts building at Broad and Chestnut Streets is being sold for an undisclosed amount. MRP Residential, of Washington, and Principal Real Estate Investors, of Des Moines, Iowa, said they had purchased 176,000 square feet of the building at 1338-48 Chestnut St. and will renovate the space as 220 rental apartments. While the buyers declined to disclose the amount they will pay, sources say the sale price would be in the range of $175 to $200 per square foot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 7, Philadelphia video artist Joshua Mosley will have his first show ever in New York. He's making quite an entrance: His work will be part of the Whitney Museum of American Art's 2014 Biennial, the prestigious survey exhibition that runs through May 25. He's not the only one. While Philadelphia has, over the years, sent a handful of works up I-95 to Manhattan for contemporary American art's big dance, this year's exhibition includes an...
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art will announce Wednesday that it has successfully completed a five-year, $54 million campaign to endow 29 staff positions across the full range of museum departments, from painting and sculpture to digital technology. The campaign began in 2008 when H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, then chairman of the museum's board of trustees, and his wife, Marguerite, offered a $27 million grant and challenged donors to match it, million for million, for the right to endow and name the positions.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By A.M. Weaver, For The Inquirer
For a group of young, culturally diverse artists, the epiphany came two years ago. Sharing a workspace in the emerging creative haven of Port Richmond, the five decided pooling their talents and opportunities would pay off faster than individual struggle. Amber Art & Design was born, and already the public-art collective has left an impressive imprint, including the Roots mural honoring the Philly hip-hop neo-soul ensemble presented over the summer at Broad and South Streets.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roger W. Anliker, 89, of Elkins Park, a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art for 25 years, died Wednesday, Sept. 25, of complications from dementia at the Abramson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales. Born in Akron, Ohio, Mr. Anliker distinguished himself early, winning awards and prizes for outstanding artwork. Mr. Anliker studied at the Cleveland Institute of Art, where he graduated in 1947 with the Agnes Gund Memorial Scholarship for travel. His schooling was interrupted by service as a mapmaker during World War II with the Army's 16th Armored Division.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
M IKE GREENSPOON, 29, is creative director of Brand Revive, a digital-marketing firm. Greenspoon, an Art Institute of Philadelphia grad, started the company in February 2012 in his Fitler Square home. In May, he moved it from co-op space in Old City into an old thrift store on 4th Street near Kauffman in Queen Village. His wife, Liza, 29, handles the books and oversees networking. I spoke with Mike. Q: How's the biz model work? A: A lot of companies get a website designed in one place, SEO [search-engine optimization]
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Clark DeLeon
My friend Van Youngman is a devout and vocal atheist, which serves him well as a college professor who teaches logic to art students and future sous chefs at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. White-bearded and endlessly opinionated, Youngman states those opinions in a rich, broadcast-quality baritone. He explains his enthusiastic nonbelief in religion with the ease and moral certainty of a monsignor who knows that he has won the trip to Ireland in next Sunday's parish raffle. Youngman argues that individual human existence is brutish, short, and meaningless.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
Creativity blossomed larger than a white water lily at this spring's end-of-year student fashion shows, where young designers sent versions of thrift-store chic and 1960s mod looks down their runways. Moore College of Art & Design senior Amanda Davis showed two collections, among the evening's highlights. Davis' urban-prep women's wear featured lettered sweaters and knee-length pleated skirts; it was voted most saleable. Her out-of-this-world evening wear, inspired by outer space, featured a bell-sleeved electric sheer gown that could outdo J.Lo.
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