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NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
The union representing 100 instructors at the Art Institute of Philadelphia announced yesterday that it had successfully negotiated its first contract at the school and had won minimum raises of 9 1/2 percent over two years. A ratification vote on the tentative pact is scheduled for March 3. The teachers became affiliated with District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in March. The new group is expected to get a local union number today.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013
Creativity blossomed larger than a white water lily at this spring's end-of-year student fashion shows, where young designers sent versions of thrift-store chic and 1960s mod looks down their runways. Moore College of Art & Design senior Amanda Davis showed two collections, among the evening's highlights. Davis' urban-prep women's wear featured lettered sweaters and knee-length pleated skirts; it was voted most saleable. Her out-of-this-world evening wear, inspired by outer space, featured a bell-sleeved electric sheer gown that could outdo J.Lo.
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Mario Malatesta, 76, a longtime instructor at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his home in Center City. For three decades, starting in the 1950s, Mr. Malatesta also worked as a staff or freelance commercial illustrator for a number of major retailers in Philadelphia, New York and Chicago. A versatile craftsman with a keen eye for perspective, he produced stylish line drawings that highlighted the attractiveness and utility of everyday objects, from living-room furnishings to kitchen appliances.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Administrators and faculty at the Art Institute of Philadelphia face one of the toughest design problems in their history. And it isn't pretty. Some 100 instructors at the school have affiliated with a labor union and are asking for a contract in plain, artless black and white. There has been one job action already - when 90 percent of the faculty boycotted the traditional end-of-term meeting with the Institute's president in December - and the faculty's chief negotiator says there's a "possibility" another job action will occur if a contract isn't signed by March.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
YOUR negative portrayal of the Art Institute of Philadelphia ("Colleges that Profit, Students Who Don't," March 25) is far outweighed by the successful and satisfactory experiences of more than 12,000 graduates. For 40 years, the Art Institute has offered opportunities for students desiring degrees that can lead to rewarding careers in applied and creative arts. Unlike traditional colleges, we track and publish placement statistics. Most recent data shows 87.6 percent of all 2009 Art Institute graduates were working in a field related to their program of study within six months of graduation.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bob Koffler's abstracts are about feelings. In a recent series of 15 oil-on-linen and oil-on-canvas paintings, Koffler, who works out of his studio in Cheltenham, depicted how he felt walking through the Himalayan Mountains, as he did in 1988. The paintings, inspired by Buddhist imagery, are now on view at a faculty show at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, where Koffler teaches figure drawing, painting, perspective, art history, anatomy, graphic design and advertising design.
LIVING
March 18, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
School assembly. Lindsey, a cute tween redhead, takes stage behind microphone. Applause. Lindsey: "Today I'm going to talk about Patty. " Pan to Patty, who smiles timidly from behind glasses. Lindsey, matter of factly: "Patty's best characteristics? She's stupid. Stupid and ugly. " Patty grimaces. Lindsey: "Look at her. Greasy hair, dirty fingernails. It makes me want to vomit. " Pan to devastated Patty. Flashes on screen: "If you wouldn't say it in person, why say it online?
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amy Aldridge was bent over at the waist, sweaty and exhausted. In each hand, the 21-year-old soloist with the Pennsylvania Ballet clutched an edge of her tutu's frothy white tulle while she gulped for air. Nutcracker audiences at the Academy of Music rarely see the Sugar Plum Fairy like this. But thanks to an unusual project undertaken by students at the Art Institute of Philadelphia, visitors to the Pennsylvania Ballet's Web site - http://www.paballet.org - should be able to peek behind the scenes of The Nutcracker to see Aldridge rehearsing the role.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2004 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The art world turns its attention back to Norristown today as the second - and, most likely, decisive - hearing on the future of the financially troubled Barnes Foundation opens in ornate Courtroom A of the Montgomery County Orphans' Court. The Barnes case "is a biggie," said Ildiko DeAngelis, director of museum studies at George Washington University and a former assistant general counsel at the Smithsonian Institution. "A lot of people are very worried about this generally," she said.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An effort by the Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial to expand into a building near its South Philadelphia complex has run into serious difficulties, forcing an expensive alternative installation of an imminent exhibition and threatening an anticipated capital fund-raising campaign. Fleisher signed an agreement of sale to buy the Achille A. Ingenito Funeral Home in the 700 block of Christian Street in August last year. The $250,000 sale was supposed to close at the end of March. It didn't.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
At the F.A.N. Gallery over more than a decade, I've watched the evolution of the work of Philadelphia realist painter Carlo Russo, particularly the stunning still lifes he's known for. He's showing those, along with some figurative and landscape works, at F.A.N. through March 26. Over the years, one could see Russo - who studied fashion design at the Art Institute and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, from which he graduated in 2004 – aggressively attack complex subject matter across several paintings.
REAL_ESTATE
March 7, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
If 119-year-old houses could talk, Travis and Dana Hanmer's rowhouse in Old Richmond would brag that two art school graduates decided it had "good bones" and bought it. The couple, who graduated from the Art Institute of Boston, moved to Philadelphia after Dana finished postgraduate work at Cranbrook Academy of Art near Detroit. "We are happy to be in on an upscaling of a neighborhood, as we were in Detroit," says Travis Hanmer, who hails from eastern Texas and works at home as a graphic artist.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John F. Duffy, 85, of Springfield, Delaware County, a childhood artist who blossomed into a graphic designer, illustrator, and teacher, died Wednesday, Dec. 30, of multiple myeloma at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. Mr. Duffy was admired for his artistic talent and appealing personality, as well as his red hair, his family said in a tribute. Born in Philadelphia, "Jack," as he was called, was the son of Thomas W. and Helen Roller Duffy. He graduated from West Catholic High School in 1949, and attended Temple University, where he met Jane Simpkins.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Art Institute of Philadelphia is among a network of for-profit colleges nationwide that will forgive nearly $103 million in student loans under a multistate settlement of complaints that the company used high-pressure tactics to enroll unqualified students. In Pennsylvania, 2,683 students stand to benefit from a total of more than $4 million in debt relief, said Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, whose office noted that 39 state attorneys general joined the settlement with Pittsburgh-based Education Management Corp., which enrolls more than 100,000 students online and at 110 locations in 32 states and Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The verb taking - as in, taking pictures - has, perhaps, never been more apt than when applied to street photographer Mark Cohen. He walks by a subject, snaps a photo without a glance through the viewfinder, and is gone. He does not ask permission. "When you ask permission to take a picture," he said, "it destroys the subtlety and the chance and the drama of the small theft that happens. " Cohen has stolen thousands of such moments - more than 50 years' worth of daily life in the small cities of northeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY STEPHAN SALISBURY, Inquirer Staff Writer ssalisbury@phillynews.com, 215-854-5594
COMMUNITY COLLEGE of Philadelphia is not usually thought of as an art school. And strictly speaking, with more than 34,000 full- and part-time students studying everything from English as a second language to computer science, it isn't. Which makes the college's art program that much more remarkable. Though its students are counted in the hundreds, the art department has very quietly had a big impact on those it teaches - and on the larger art world. "I believe CCP is a very under-the-radar institution that does a great deal of good for Philly but never gets the acknowledgment deserved," said highly regarded painter and photographer Diane Burko, who taught there from 1970 to 2000.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James E. Buckley, 71, of Chestnut Hill, a fine-arts appraiser and auctioneer, died Thursday, Sept. 3, of pancreatic cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born in Chicago, Mr. Buckley graduated from South Shore High School there in 1963. He went on to study at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1964 and at the Cleveland Institute of Technology in 1968. While serving in the Air Force from 1964 to 1968, he was an illustrator for the military police at the Oscoda, Mich., Air Force base.
NEWS
September 8, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not a secret garden. But people are still surprised to see it - sprouting from a parking lot, the vines climbing a cinder-block wall in Chinatown North. "I used to think it was just flowers when I walked by," said Joyce Randell, who lives not far away. Set between a Shell station and a Catholic school, this small, corner-store-sized farm has big ambitions: to provide food to the homeless, purpose to the aimless, and satisfaction to everyone willing to get their hands dirty.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
To Monica Ippolito, family meant hours of listening to her grandfather's stories: how he'd fought in World War II; how, after he eloped with her grandmother, his mother-in-law chased them with the wooden spoon she called her "macaroni stick. " For Tim McIntire, family ties were equally fierce. His sister, born with special needs, defied doctors' predictions that she would never walk or talk. "I had a pretty big hand in helping to raise her," Tim says. When they met, he was a first-year student and Monica was a senior at Philadelphia's High School for the Creative and Performing Arts.
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