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Art Pottery

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NEWS
January 9, 1999 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the most popular pottery collectibles is Roseville; one of the foremost authorities on it is David Rago. At a one-day two-session sale on Jan. 30 at his Lambertville auction house, Rago will sell nearly 1,500 pieces of fine porcelain, including a 1,000-piece single consignment of Roseville from a collector in Portland, Ore. Roseville was made in Zanesville, Ohio. Rago was a guest expert on a recent broadcast of the Antiques Road Show in Cincinnati, where he held forth on Roseville and other art pottery.
LIVING
August 9, 1987 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Like caviar, art pottery from the turn of the century is a cultivated taste. To distinguish between the gutsy and the klutzy in art pottery - and it is often a fine line - takes an educated eye, and the best place this summer for such schooling is at an exhibition of 200 pieces from the collections of American Ceramic Arts Society members, on view through this month at Christie's, 502 Park Ave., in New York. (The pots are not to be auctioned; Christie's simply made exhibition space available to the society during a time when no sales are scheduled.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coinciding with the Philadelphia Craft Show, which opens next week, several auction houses will be holding sales that also will feature crafts. Country sales late next week, for instance, will offer buttons, which like other crafts combine art and utility, and art pottery. The buttons, all from a single local collector and in a wide variety of materials, will be offered by Dale L. Putt in a two-day sale beginning at 10 a.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday in Ephrata. The 900-lot sale will offer buttons by the card, some with 60 to 100 buttons a card, others with only one. The top items in the sale, according to Putt, are buttons made in the 18th century.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
"For every bear that ever there was, will gather there for certain becuz" . . . well, not at the Teddy Bears' picnic, as the venerable children's song puts it - but at the Kimberton Fairgrounds, where Ron Rhoads will feature more than 150 teddies at an auction beginning at 9 a.m. tomorrow. The bears are mostly Steiff, a well-known name in the stuffed-toy animal business. Some that will be offered tomorrow may sell for $400 to $500, including a Red Alfonzo and a Teddy Rose, both by Steiff.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Rago, the Lambertville specialist in Arts and Crafts collectibles, will be doing what he's best at beginning at 11 a.m. tomorrow with a sale featuring more than 850 lots of art pottery. Of that, 350 lots are from a single collection of Roseville, Weller, Owens and other potteries in the Ohio town of Zanesville. The auction also will include more than 50 Stangl birds as well as Arts and Crafts wrought metal furniture and accessories, some modern items and some Victorian items.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
The Renninger antique and collector show, which has been held in various locations since 1975, will run tomorrow through Sunday at the Valley Forge Convention Center, with more than 200 exhibitors expected. It will be Renninger's first show in the area. "We have markets in Kutztown, Adamstown and in Florida. We decided to try Valley Forge because we feel the Philadelphia area could use another good antique show. Also, I think the Valley Forge area is a good center, because it is relatively close to New York and Philadelphia," said Jim Renninger, owner of the Renninger markets.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: I have a table 30 inches high and 19 1/2 inches wide, with two drawers above a simple pedestal base. Some of the mahogany veneer is chipped. How old is it and what's it worth? Answer: Your circa-1840s American "pillar and scroll"-style table or night stand is a plain and functional piece, likely made by a provincial craftsman. It wasn't intended to be very grand or costly, but nevertheless has nicely grained drawer fronts. A closer examination would reveal whether its drawer pulls and escutcheons (the plates around the key holes)
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Art glass, American Indian artifacts and industrial-strength gold chains from that increasingly popular consigner, the district attorney's office, will be offered at a variety of sales next week - including two on Monday, Memorial Day. That is when the art glass will be offered at the Arp Auction Co., 156 Fallsington Ave., Tullytown, starting at 10 a.m. Perhaps the most important piece is a Duffner and Kimberly leaded lamp on a Gorham base...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Rookwood Pottery Co. operated in Cincinnati from its founding in 1880 until 1960, and in Mississippi from that year until it closed in 1967. Its first five decades were the glory years, when the company's artists and artisans created many of the designs that elevated Rookwood to the pinnacle of American art pottery. Philadelphia is intrinsic to Rookwood's history. Maria Longworth Nichols was inspired to found the pottery after seeing an extensive display of ceramics from around the world at the 1876 Centennial Exposition here.
LIVING
September 8, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
It is tempting to regard the Declaration of Independence as a document in which the long-smoldering resentment of the American colonists against the English crown finally burst into a blaze of grievances. But it was not the first time the Continental Congress took collective pen to hand to advocate revolution. On July 6, 1775, almost exactly a year before the Declaration of Independence, the body adopted "A Declaration of the Representatives of the United Colonies of North America, now met in General Congress at Philadelphia, setting forth Causes and Necessity of their taking up Arms.
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LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer food columnist
My eye would always light as a child on the chipped redware pie plate in the corner cupboard, my parents' names scratched forever in the glaze. That same pottery - one of the earliest folk arts of the Pennsylvania Dutch - captivates me to this day. And I've vowed this year to get up to the old stone schoolhouse in rural Reinholds where since 1962, Ned Foltz (who at 67 is cutting back) has used local clays in his treasured, hand-thrown homages to those pieces of tradition. Foltz's platters, bowls and lidded pots are sold at Village Pottery in Intercourse, among other shops, and will be on sale at the workshop from noon until 3 p.m. Dec. 1 and 2, and roughly those hours each Saturday until Christmas.
LIVING
September 8, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
It is tempting to regard the Declaration of Independence as a document in which the long-smoldering resentment of the American colonists against the English crown finally burst into a blaze of grievances. But it was not the first time the Continental Congress took collective pen to hand to advocate revolution. On July 6, 1775, almost exactly a year before the Declaration of Independence, the body adopted "A Declaration of the Representatives of the United Colonies of North America, now met in General Congress at Philadelphia, setting forth Causes and Necessity of their taking up Arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Rookwood Pottery Co. operated in Cincinnati from its founding in 1880 until 1960, and in Mississippi from that year until it closed in 1967. Its first five decades were the glory years, when the company's artists and artisans created many of the designs that elevated Rookwood to the pinnacle of American art pottery. Philadelphia is intrinsic to Rookwood's history. Maria Longworth Nichols was inspired to found the pottery after seeing an extensive display of ceramics from around the world at the 1876 Centennial Exposition here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
It was just a couple of weeks ago that antiques dealer David Rago was emotionally moved as he stood in front of a Kandinsky painting in a Madrid art museum. Art does that to Rago. He'll probably have such a visceral experience again tomorrow as he sends nearly 1,000 pieces of exquisite art pottery across his Lambertville, N.J., auction block in his semi-annual Roseville/Zanesville sale. At the turn of the 20th century, Zanesville, Ohio, was smack in the middle of the arts and crafts movement.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
"For every bear that ever there was, will gather there for certain becuz" . . . well, not at the Teddy Bears' picnic, as the venerable children's song puts it - but at the Kimberton Fairgrounds, where Ron Rhoads will feature more than 150 teddies at an auction beginning at 9 a.m. tomorrow. The bears are mostly Steiff, a well-known name in the stuffed-toy animal business. Some that will be offered tomorrow may sell for $400 to $500, including a Red Alfonzo and a Teddy Rose, both by Steiff.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the most popular pottery collectibles is Roseville; one of the foremost authorities on it is David Rago. At a one-day two-session sale on Jan. 30 at his Lambertville auction house, Rago will sell nearly 1,500 pieces of fine porcelain, including a 1,000-piece single consignment of Roseville from a collector in Portland, Ore. Roseville was made in Zanesville, Ohio. Rago was a guest expert on a recent broadcast of the Antiques Road Show in Cincinnati, where he held forth on Roseville and other art pottery.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Rago, the Lambertville specialist in Arts and Crafts collectibles, will be doing what he's best at beginning at 11 a.m. tomorrow with a sale featuring more than 850 lots of art pottery. Of that, 350 lots are from a single collection of Roseville, Weller, Owens and other potteries in the Ohio town of Zanesville. The auction also will include more than 50 Stangl birds as well as Arts and Crafts wrought metal furniture and accessories, some modern items and some Victorian items.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Rago is best known for his ceramics auctions. But his next sale, beginning at 11 a.m. tomorrow at his hall at 333 N. Main St., Lambertville, N.J., also features other arts and crafts categories. There are, for instance, 25 lots of Mission furniture, including pieces by Limbert and by Stickley, whose name has become synonymous with the style. There also is 20th-century furniture by Bertoia and George Nelson. Art glass is another category that will be featured. There are 30 lots, including pieces by Galle, Loetz and Tiffany.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coinciding with the Philadelphia Craft Show, which opens next week, several auction houses will be holding sales that also will feature crafts. Country sales late next week, for instance, will offer buttons, which like other crafts combine art and utility, and art pottery. The buttons, all from a single local collector and in a wide variety of materials, will be offered by Dale L. Putt in a two-day sale beginning at 10 a.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday in Ephrata. The 900-lot sale will offer buttons by the card, some with 60 to 100 buttons a card, others with only one. The top items in the sale, according to Putt, are buttons made in the 18th century.
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