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NEWS
May 15, 2003 | Daily News Staff Report
The Tyler School of Art, Temple University's premier art institution, will move to the university's campus in North Philadelphia from its present location in Elkins Park. A new, four-story building will be built on the site bounded by 12th, Marvine, Norris and Diamond streets. The university hopes to open it in September 2006. Mayor Street hailed the decision by Temple as another example of a reversal of the decades-long trend of institutions and businesses leaving the city.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
Temple University administrators are considering moving the Tyler School of Art from Elkins Park to Temple's main campus in North Philadelphia as part of a plan to consolidate several college arts programs in one building. Temple vice president James Hilty said Thursday that as part of the university's plan to develop the eastern portion of the main campus - a section that stretches east of Broad Street - administrators have considered combining Tyler's program with others offered at the main campus.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard H. Reinhardt, 77, of Newtown Square, a silversmith and jewelry maker who spent more than 50 years at the University of the Arts as a student, teacher of crafts, and school official, died of bladder cancer Dec. 29 at Paoli Memorial Hospital. During the 1950s, Mr. Reinhardt founded the jewelry and metalsmithing programs and was chairman of the crafts department at the Philadelphia Museum School of Art. When the school became the Philadelphia College of Art in the early 1960s, he was chairman of the industrial design department.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the unfurling of a green school banner and a rousing feminist speech at an outdoor convocation at Logan Circle yesterday, students and administrators at Moore College of Art and Design reaffirmed their commitment to retaining its status as a school for women only. Officials of the 146-year-old school formally announced that they had, at least temporarily, abandoned discussions begun last spring of a possible merger with the University of the Arts. The discussions provoked an outpouring of sentiment among students, faculty, alumna and staff, who organized over the summer in opposition to the plan.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
For more than a half-century, it has stood as a symbol of culture in eastern Montgomery County. With its sprawling buildings tucked among 13 acres of verdant hills in the Elkins Park section of Cheltenham, Temple University's Tyler School of Art offers prospective artists a setting that's serene - yet minutes away from the hum and buzz of Center City Philadelphia. "It's easy and carefree to work while you're out here," said Jeff Mitchell, 29, a graduate student at the campus who hails from Seattle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jack Cowart, chief curator of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, had an unusual perspective on the 97th annual exhibition staged by the fellowship of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Cowart was one of two jurors who selected the show; the other, Gregory Gillespie, is an artist who lives in Massachusetts. The Corcoran, like the Pennsylvania Academy, is an art school as well as a museum. Writing in the exhibition checklist, Cowart observes that he often wonders what happens to art students after they leave "structured academics and studios" behind.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A year since a move was first proposed, the fate of Temple University's Tyler School of Art campus in Elkins Park remains unknown because a task force assigned to review the pros and cons missed its April 30 deadline for reporting to university president Peter Liacouras. The task force will be about two weeks late with its report, said Rochelle Toner, Tyler's dean and a task force member. "We're still deliberating," Toner said yesterday. "There are a number of scenarios being considered, and the cost estimates are time-consuming.
NEWS
December 12, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite questions raised by its grant administrator, the Delaware River Port Authority has awarded $250,000 in bridge-toll proceeds to a new Philadelphia art school run by an internationally famous artist whose portraits of the rich and famous fetch six-figure fees. The grant is the largest single award given to an institution by a DRPA fund aimed at boosting arts and cultural organizations in Philadelphia and its suburbs. It will nearly double the school's budget for the next two years.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Ridge comes to Philadelphia today bearing a big gift: $15 million to help fund a major expansion of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Ridge will announce the award this morning at a news conference at the nearly 200-year-old art school and museum, housed in a landmark 1876 Frank Furness building at Broad and Cherry Streets. The money, from the state's capital redevelopment assistance program, will be used to renovate an 11-story office building on Broad Street, just across Cherry Street.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Such a small, simple change: 15 tables, 15 umbrellas, 60 chairs, and a serving cart on the sidewalk outside the Moore College of Art & Design. But those tables, chairs and umbrellas - an actual outdoor cafe on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - may signal that all those years of talk about making the Parkway "pedestrian friendly," a place in which to linger and drink coffee, have begun to bear fruit. Unless it rains, the Diamond Cafe at Moore opens today. It will be open April through October, seven days a week, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is on Logan Square just outside Moore's gallery and art shop.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016
On May 12, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) hosted a preview party for its 115th annual Student Exhibition. PAFA, founded in 1805, is America's first and oldest art school and museum. More than 10,000 people visited the exhibition, which ran from May 13 to June 5, and featured art from certificate and post-baccalaureate students. Art sales totaled $250,000. The preview was followed by cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, and music. causecelebration@philly.com  
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
King Firemarth is falling down a cliff. The drop is long, and the king is certain of his death until a friendly dragon scoops him up and deposits him safely on level ground. The unexpected rescue teaches Firemarth, who had previously feared the dragon - and all different-looking beasts in the kingdom - that "you shouldn't deny someone respect simply because they're different. " So goes The Legend of Firemarth , a children's book written and illustrated by Paulsboro High School sophomore Samson Beaver, who took home first prize this week in B'nai B'rith's "Diverse Minds Writing Challenge" in South Jersey.
REAL_ESTATE
March 7, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
If 119-year-old houses could talk, Travis and Dana Hanmer's rowhouse in Old Richmond would brag that two art school graduates decided it had "good bones" and bought it. The couple, who graduated from the Art Institute of Boston, moved to Philadelphia after Dana finished postgraduate work at Cranbrook Academy of Art near Detroit. "We are happy to be in on an upscaling of a neighborhood, as we were in Detroit," says Travis Hanmer, who hails from eastern Texas and works at home as a graphic artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | Elizabeth Wellington, Staff Writer
John Wind loved David Bowie's music, but it was the musician's glam-rock style - the fiery red hair, eyelids painted teal blue, metallic skinny pants, and long, dramatic trench coats - that gave Wind the OK he needed to embrace his outsider status as a teen and young adult. "I was so attracted to his outrageousness, independence, and sexual ambiguity," said Wind, 54, remembering how Bowie's irreverent fashion choices inspired him during his nerdy days at Harriton High School in Lower Merion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In his 1965 book, A Dialogue With Solitude , Philadelphia-born photographer and master printmaker Dave Heath looked at the loneliness of the soldier in Korea, of the sullen beatnik in the coffeehouse, the motherless child alone in a park, the lovers turned away from each other, City Hall in darkly uneasy repose. That withdrawal from society even in the midst of a swarming crowd is what has always informed his aesthetic judgments in chiaroscuro tones. You can see them at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in "Multitude, Solitude" which focuses on Heath's work from the 1940s through the '60s.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are investigating the possibility that a transgender woman slain in Logan on Tuesday morning was killed during an attempted robbery. Homicide Capt. James Clark said police had fielded several tips since asking for the public's help in finding the group of men who beat 22-year-old Kiesha Jenkins and shot her twice in the back as she lay on the ground. Several of those tips suggested that Jenkins had been the victim of a robbery, Clark said. And the area where she was found dead - 13th and Wingohocking Streets, near Hunting Park - had seen several robberies recently, he said.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
YOLANDA JENKINS doesn't mince words, especially now, in the throes of devastating grief. "I want them to find the motherf-----s who killed my son," she told the Daily News last night. "He didn't deserve this," she said of Stephen Jenkins, a transgender woman gunned down in cold blood near a park in Logan early Tuesday. "He loved all people. " Despite her loss, she swelled with pride at talking about her son, who graduated with honors from Benjamin Franklin High School.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY STEPHAN SALISBURY, Inquirer Staff Writer ssalisbury@phillynews.com, 215-854-5594
COMMUNITY COLLEGE of Philadelphia is not usually thought of as an art school. And strictly speaking, with more than 34,000 full- and part-time students studying everything from English as a second language to computer science, it isn't. Which makes the college's art program that much more remarkable. Though its students are counted in the hundreds, the art department has very quietly had a big impact on those it teaches - and on the larger art world. "I believe CCP is a very under-the-radar institution that does a great deal of good for Philly but never gets the acknowledgment deserved," said highly regarded painter and photographer Diane Burko, who taught there from 1970 to 2000.
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