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NEWS
May 15, 2003 | Daily News Staff Report
The Tyler School of Art, Temple University's premier art institution, will move to the university's campus in North Philadelphia from its present location in Elkins Park. A new, four-story building will be built on the site bounded by 12th, Marvine, Norris and Diamond streets. The university hopes to open it in September 2006. Mayor Street hailed the decision by Temple as another example of a reversal of the decades-long trend of institutions and businesses leaving the city.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
Temple University administrators are considering moving the Tyler School of Art from Elkins Park to Temple's main campus in North Philadelphia as part of a plan to consolidate several college arts programs in one building. Temple vice president James Hilty said Thursday that as part of the university's plan to develop the eastern portion of the main campus - a section that stretches east of Broad Street - administrators have considered combining Tyler's program with others offered at the main campus.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard H. Reinhardt, 77, of Newtown Square, a silversmith and jewelry maker who spent more than 50 years at the University of the Arts as a student, teacher of crafts, and school official, died of bladder cancer Dec. 29 at Paoli Memorial Hospital. During the 1950s, Mr. Reinhardt founded the jewelry and metalsmithing programs and was chairman of the crafts department at the Philadelphia Museum School of Art. When the school became the Philadelphia College of Art in the early 1960s, he was chairman of the industrial design department.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the unfurling of a green school banner and a rousing feminist speech at an outdoor convocation at Logan Circle yesterday, students and administrators at Moore College of Art and Design reaffirmed their commitment to retaining its status as a school for women only. Officials of the 146-year-old school formally announced that they had, at least temporarily, abandoned discussions begun last spring of a possible merger with the University of the Arts. The discussions provoked an outpouring of sentiment among students, faculty, alumna and staff, who organized over the summer in opposition to the plan.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
For more than a half-century, it has stood as a symbol of culture in eastern Montgomery County. With its sprawling buildings tucked among 13 acres of verdant hills in the Elkins Park section of Cheltenham, Temple University's Tyler School of Art offers prospective artists a setting that's serene - yet minutes away from the hum and buzz of Center City Philadelphia. "It's easy and carefree to work while you're out here," said Jeff Mitchell, 29, a graduate student at the campus who hails from Seattle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Jack Cowart, chief curator of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, had an unusual perspective on the 97th annual exhibition staged by the fellowship of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Cowart was one of two jurors who selected the show; the other, Gregory Gillespie, is an artist who lives in Massachusetts. The Corcoran, like the Pennsylvania Academy, is an art school as well as a museum. Writing in the exhibition checklist, Cowart observes that he often wonders what happens to art students after they leave "structured academics and studios" behind.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A year since a move was first proposed, the fate of Temple University's Tyler School of Art campus in Elkins Park remains unknown because a task force assigned to review the pros and cons missed its April 30 deadline for reporting to university president Peter Liacouras. The task force will be about two weeks late with its report, said Rochelle Toner, Tyler's dean and a task force member. "We're still deliberating," Toner said yesterday. "There are a number of scenarios being considered, and the cost estimates are time-consuming.
NEWS
December 12, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite questions raised by its grant administrator, the Delaware River Port Authority has awarded $250,000 in bridge-toll proceeds to a new Philadelphia art school run by an internationally famous artist whose portraits of the rich and famous fetch six-figure fees. The grant is the largest single award given to an institution by a DRPA fund aimed at boosting arts and cultural organizations in Philadelphia and its suburbs. It will nearly double the school's budget for the next two years.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Ridge comes to Philadelphia today bearing a big gift: $15 million to help fund a major expansion of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Ridge will announce the award this morning at a news conference at the nearly 200-year-old art school and museum, housed in a landmark 1876 Frank Furness building at Broad and Cherry Streets. The money, from the state's capital redevelopment assistance program, will be used to renovate an 11-story office building on Broad Street, just across Cherry Street.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Such a small, simple change: 15 tables, 15 umbrellas, 60 chairs, and a serving cart on the sidewalk outside the Moore College of Art & Design. But those tables, chairs and umbrellas - an actual outdoor cafe on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - may signal that all those years of talk about making the Parkway "pedestrian friendly," a place in which to linger and drink coffee, have begun to bear fruit. Unless it rains, the Diamond Cafe at Moore opens today. It will be open April through October, seven days a week, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is on Logan Square just outside Moore's gallery and art shop.
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NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
POLICE THIS WEEK arrested one driver for a drunken-driving accident last summer that killed a pedestrian and another driver for a hit-and-run collision last month that grievously injured a Temple University senior. Capt. John Wilczynski, commander of the Accident Investigation Division, said yesterday that Erica Zanczuk, 30, of Morrell Park, was charged in last summer's death of Justin Reidy, 22. Reidy was standing on the sidewalk, waiting for a bus, on Academy Road near the Northeast Philadelphia Airport just after 3 a.m. on Aug. 1 when Zanczuk lost control of her speeding 1997 Nissan Pathfinder, jumped the curb, hit Reidy and then slammed into a utility pole, knocking it to the ground, police said.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A public memorial service will be held Monday, Dec. 8, for Frances Elliot Storey, 81, an artist and supporter of the arts in Philadelphia, who died Sunday, Oct. 5, of cancer at her Spring Garden home. The service is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Burial was private. Born in Boston in 1933, Mrs. Storey grew up in Needham and Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass. She attended Foxcroft School, then Radcliffe College, and graduated in 1956 with a degree in fine arts.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As president of Moore College of Art and Design, Cecelia Fitzgibbon manages a budget of $20.2 million and a staff of 177. How can it be, she wonders, that she has a 27-year-old son when she feels like she's still 26 years old? How can it be that she's actually celebrating her 60th birthday this Monday? Maybe she'll be able to relax, because her weekend was busy. On Saturday, she presided over Moore's second annual Leadership Conference for Women in the Arts, a gathering that drew many of the region's female leaders in arts and cultural organizations to share their experiences with female students from Moore and the region's other art colleges.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Art students commonly learn to draw by sketching a model who is not wearing clothes. In the dim, after-hours light at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Jason Poole's students are drawing from a model without flesh: a dinosaur skeleton. How can you draw a creature no one has ever seen? The bones are key, providing a framework for artists to envision fully formed prehistoric beasts with muscle and skin. Every Monday night for 10 weeks this fall, the 13 adult students enter a side entrance of the venerable natural history museum, sign in with a security guard, and head off to Dinosaur Hall, where they squat on the floor in the shadows of Tyrannosaurus rex . Poole, 44, of East Oak Lane, is their guide, equal parts art teacher and anatomy instructor.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Laura Araujo had lived in the West Philadelphia rooming house only for a short time, but it was long enough to convince her housemate that she had money, Philadelphia police say. The man who rented the room next to hers, Jerry Jakson, had seen her car - a 2011 Toyota RAV4 - and took it as an indication of her wealth, Lt. Walter Bell said Wednesday. Police believe Jakson had planned to rob Araujo, a 23-year-old graduate of the Art Institute of Philadelphia who was about to move from the house.
SPORTS
October 30, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stefanie Ulmer's pre-championship preparation was the same as it has been for the last four years. Before Monday's Public League girls' soccer Class AAA championship against Central, Ulmer and her teammates waited in Franklin Towne Charter's auditorium for two hours in silence. Ulmer knew going home would produce nerves, so she and her teammates stayed together before heading to Northeast for the game. By the time it started, the senior showed no signs of stress, scoring three goals to lead Franklin Towne Charter to a third straight championship with a 5-1 win against Central.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Two years out of Yale University's art school, Jennifer Bartlett moved to New York City and began to think deeply "about what I could do that wasn't copying somebody else. " Nine years later, the consequences of that intense contemplating emerged spectacularly at Paula Cooper Gallery as a monumental painting titled Rhapsody , now owned by the Museum of Modern Art. The painting announced a breakthrough not only in its broad intellectual reach and its mix of abstraction and representation but also in its systematic gridded structure and particularly in its medium.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Tycoons hoping to better society from beyond the grave might consider living (and dying) somewhere other than Pennsylvania. This is, after all, the state where Albert Barnes' idiosyncratic suburban art school was repurposed as a downtown museum, and where the school underwritten by Milton Hershey's fortune has become mired in inexplicable investments and state investigations. Yet another dead capitalist's construct is unraveling at Philadelphia's Girard College. The boarding school for needy children, built in the mid-19th century with the massive fortune of financier Stephen Girard, is undergoing a radical restructuring.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Bryan's accomplishments were many and varied. She was a talented artist, majoring in painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She spoke fluent Spanish. She volunteered with Habitat for Humanity and at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and moonlighted as a vegetarian cook. On Thursday, her family was reeling from her death. Ms. Bryan, 24, of Lower Merion, was killed Wednesday, June 5, while shopping at the Center City Salvation Army thrift store crushed when the building next door collapsed during demolition work.
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