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Art Supplies

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NEWS
February 19, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Presidents Day weekend will offer a variety of auctions. Art equipment, the settlement of a bankruptcy involving Art Etc., a shop in Feasterville, will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow by Barry Slosberg at his gallery at 232 N. Second St. With an inventory divided into lots of manageable size and prices likely to be a fraction of retail, the sale should appeal to art students as well as to commercial buyers. There will be oils in tubes, sketch pads, brushes and easels.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Rubber cement, found in most public school classrooms, is a potentially toxic substance, according to warnings in a booklet compiled for teachers in the Central Bucks School District. "Rubber cement is very hazardous. It should not be used by any schoolchildren," Margie Urban, a Doyle Elementary School teacher who helped write the booklet, told school board members Thursday. Urban put the booklet together with Tom Conboy, a teacher at Central Bucks West High School, and Marilyn Inman, a teacher at Lenape Junior High.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who for 21 years has cleaned the men's and women's locker rooms, mopped floors and emptied garbage at Merck, Sharpe & Dohme has a little secret he'd be happy to share if anyone asked, but they usually don't. He's an artist. Not famous, but talented. Wain Hunter has a certificate from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and although he probably could earn a living as an illustrator or portrait artist, he sees no good reason to struggle for money. "This suits my means," Hunter said as he prepared his morning coffee - at noon - one day last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
After Hurricane Katrina hit, New Orleans-area art teacher Kathy Hughes salvaged art supplies for her students. The students' resulting artworks, on display at Winterthur starting Saturday, capture their unique experiences as children affected by a natural disaster. "Reflections on the Storm" includes 22 works of art created by Hughes' elementary school students from the Jefferson Parish public schools. Hughes recovered what art supplies she could post-Katrina because "I believed that art could serve a therapeutic purpose in helping the students grapple with the many emotions and experiences they had endured.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Easels or AZT: Take your pick. When an artist has HIV or AIDS, art supplies, schooling or work-related activities can become luxury items. The financial drain created by medical expenses often prevent a painter from painting, a sculptor from sculpting. The situation led to the creation of the Working Fund for the Philadelphia Area Artists Living with AIDS/HIV, a program at the Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial. Puerto Rican chanteuse Minnie Acosta, a regular performer at the Hotel Atop the Bellevue, will present "A Heart's Voice," a concert to benefit the Working Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
To walk into the new East Falls print studio of Fresh Artists - with its state-of-the-art copiers, rows of Mac terminals, even a paid staff member or two - is to see a nonprofit that has graduated to the next level. That there is a studio at all is an achievement for the organization, the brainchild of Barbara Chandler Allen and her son Roger Allen, which has funneled $150,000 worth of art supplies into Philadelphia public schools by trading digitally enlarged student artwork for donations from corporations and institutions including Comcast, Independence Blue Cross, and Drexel University.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lou Ann Merkle, Sandy Run Middle School art teacher, called it a goodwill gesture. The Upper Dublin School District called it theft. A Montgomery County Court judge threw out the charges. But the bitter saga that began in August, when Merkle was charged with stealing art supplies she says she intended to donate to a community center, has resurfaced in the form of a $3 million federal lawsuit Merkle has filed against the school district and the township police. The 20-page complaint - received by the school district yesterday - charges the district, Superintendent Clair G. Brown, Sandy Run Middle School principal Margaret Thomas, the Upper Dublin Police Department, and Detective Jack Hahn with violating Merkle's civil and constitutional rights.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
The oldest art center on the Main Line, the Wayne Art Center, 413 Maplewood Ave., will offer 35 adult workshops and courses, and 18 courses for children and teens this fall. The classes, which are to begin Sept. 30, will be taught by 32 instructors and range in fee from a free class for seniors, Plus Art, on Mondays, to a $200 art-experimentation class, Possibilities, on Tuesdays. Most classes will be repeated in the winter period, which is to begin Jan. 27. Classes are held Monday through Friday, days and evenings, and Saturday mornings for children.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2009 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To refresh his corporate offices, Bill George, president of Health Partners Inc., acquired 42 unique works. He was drawn to vibrant colors, minimalist pieces by emerging artists, and powerful primitives unlike any he had seen on business walls. He liked the simplicity, the brightness, the accessibility of his choices. And he loved that they made his workers smile. "It is hard to be in a bad mood when you look up and see these," he said, sounding like a parent who has papered the refrigerator with a child's awkward, but alluring, art. Which isn't far from what he did. Health Partners, an HMO owned by local hospitals and health clinics, was the initial corporate donor to Fresh Artists, an inspired new nonprofit that seeks to solve a problem (finding art supplies for schoolchildren)
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Martha Woodall and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting at a table in the shade of sycamore trees outside the new Barnes museum, Isabella Royal, 5, was a tiny picture of concentration Saturday morning. Henri Matisse's The Red Madras Headdress was on display inside, but Isabella was peering at a small laminated reproduction and using colored pencils to create her own impression of Matisse's iconic image of a seated woman in a patterned headdress. Her parents, Kenya and Peter, watched, rapt. "Normally she's coloring in a coloring book or just using a little notepad and scribbling," Kenya said as her daughter tried to decide between using gold or orange to draw the woman's chair.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
October 12, 2014 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Once Dora Siemel saw the cedar house on the Unami Watershed in Green Lane, Montgomery County, she knew she had found a place Buddha would have yearned for. The setting is calming, verdant and serene. "There is no ugly way to get here," she says of the journey through abundant woodlands, where creeks snake past colossal boulders. The land is home to fox, deer, trout, and several species of salamander. That tranquil spirit also exists inside the two-story, 2,200-square-foot house where Siemel and her husband, Bob Wolfarth, have lived for 22 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billy Blaise Dufala's usual destination for art supplies doesn't offer oil paints, archival paper, or sable brushes. But it does have new inventory daily - tons of it, brought in by the truckload from construction sites and 1-800-GOT-JUNK pickups. As he wanders, wearing a hard hat and reflective vest, among mountains of wood pallets, concrete rubble, and twisted metal at Revolution Recovery in Tacony, he's intrigued by a tattered but, it turns out, functional patio umbrella, a perfectly good roll of roofing vinyl, and a stuffed likeness of a New Kids on the Block-era Jordan Knight, still in its box. Uncovering potential within society's castoffs is at the core of the nonprofit Recycled Artist in Residency (RAIR)
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time has almost run out for CAPA students' hopes of putting on a musical, the centerpiece of their school year. With just a few days left until the deadline to raise enough money to produce a show, the High School for Creative and Performing Arts' parents group is about $6,000 short. That the city's premier arts school will go a second year without its signature performance breaks senior Maya Bjornson's heart. "When we can't do the biggest performance of the year, what does that say?
NEWS
October 2, 2013
TOMS SHOES is a do-gooding company that launched in 2006 with an innovative plan to provide a free pair of shoes to kids in developing countries for every pair bought at retail. So far, thousands of shoes have gone to children in struggling nations like Haiti, Ethiopia and Rwanda. And soon, Philadelphia. Last week, the school district announced that it will give away more than 3,000 pairs of TOMS shoes to Philadelphia's low-income and homeless children. Of course we're thrilled that needy kids in our city will get a new pair of shoes (actually, they'll get two pairs)
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amanda Long is immobile without her wheelchair. She lacks the coordination to lift a fork. And she has not spoken a word since she was 3. Yet Long's powerful artwork hangs on the walls of Tastykake Inc.'s corporate headquarters, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 15 other buildings on the East Coast. Long, 21 of Center Valley, Pa., is one of more than 50 students who attend HMS School for Children With Cerebral Palsy in University City. Like the Irish painter and writer Christy Brown, portrayed in the film My Left Foot , Long and her fellow students have repurposed their bodies to overcome some of the restrictions imposed by their illness.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A handyman and amateur artist with a history of drug addiction pleaded guilty Wednesday to bludgeoning to death a neighbor of Mayor Nutter. Edward Gause, 45, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the Nov. 5, 2010, slaying of Robert Lancaster Sr., who had hired Gause to work on his Wynnefield house. Gause's plea deal with prosecutors resulted in his being sentenced to 20 to 30 years in prison. "I'd like to apologize for my actions to his family," he said to Lancaster's son Robert Jr. and sister Carole Pegrem.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
Jen Bryant lives in Chester County and is the author of "A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin," illustrated by Melissa Sweet In 1933, if you peered through the first-floor window of a certain plain brick house on Gay Street in West Chester, you might see a strongly built African American man, impeccably dressed in pressed white shirt and wool vest, his left hand grasping his right wrist, leaning toward his easel. His gaze is riveted, intense, as he applies from his palette, in thick, short strokes, house paint he's scavenged from the borough's alleys.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
To walk into the new East Falls print studio of Fresh Artists - with its state-of-the-art copiers, rows of Mac terminals, even a paid staff member or two - is to see a nonprofit that has graduated to the next level. That there is a studio at all is an achievement for the organization, the brainchild of Barbara Chandler Allen and her son Roger Allen, which has funneled $150,000 worth of art supplies into Philadelphia public schools by trading digitally enlarged student artwork for donations from corporations and institutions including Comcast, Independence Blue Cross, and Drexel University.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Emily Mendell
The hollering startles me awake. "It's a great morning for skinny dipping!" I open one eye, and my froggy voice can barely croak out, "What time is it?" The answer comes from my equally comatose roommate on the bottom bunk below me: "5:25 a.m. . . .. I think. " She sighs. The ruckus continues right outside our door, with the offenders showing no concern for those of us still sleeping. Their voices get louder. My eyes are now wide open, and I know they will not close again until late that night.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Martha Woodall and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting at a table in the shade of sycamore trees outside the new Barnes museum, Isabella Royal, 5, was a tiny picture of concentration Saturday morning. Henri Matisse's The Red Madras Headdress was on display inside, but Isabella was peering at a small laminated reproduction and using colored pencils to create her own impression of Matisse's iconic image of a seated woman in a patterned headdress. Her parents, Kenya and Peter, watched, rapt. "Normally she's coloring in a coloring book or just using a little notepad and scribbling," Kenya said as her daughter tried to decide between using gold or orange to draw the woman's chair.
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