CollectionsArt Therapy
IN THE NEWS

Art Therapy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By Eric Shimoli, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a 9-year-old growing up in North Philadelphia, Charletta Brown drew made-up characters inspired by her favorite comic books. Today, at 45, her work is vastly more sophisticated - and is winning recognition of a sort. Her creations, including a sculptured castle, an incense burner molded from clay, and drawings of an African mask, were among the major attractions at an art exhibit featuring works by people undergoing art therapy at a mental-health center in Center City. "I already sold three pieces," Brown said last week.
NEWS
December 30, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is an odd cancer support group. During a 2 1/2-hour session earlier this month, no one mentioned cancer - or, for that matter, even illness or pain. That's not unusual, said Caroline Peterson, who runs the experimental group at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital that combines a trinity of alternative stress reducers: yoga, meditation and art therapy. The focus is on developing relaxation skills and self-understanding. "The illness experience comes up, but it's not the predominant approach," said Peterson, an art therapist.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Patricia Ilgren Kapp, 63, of Ridgefield, Conn., an art therapist who worked in and around Philadelphia, died Thursday, Aug. 18, of cancer at Regional Hospice & Home Care in Danbury, Conn. Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Kapp was the daughter of Dr. Herbert and Maxine Ilgren. She lived in Roxborough before moving to Connecticut. A gifted artist, Mrs. Kapp had always wanted to pursue a career in art. She graduated from Lower Merion High School and attended Alfred (N.Y.) University, but took two years off to travel and study art in Europe.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011
Julie Kowalski has played a variety of positions for Gateway's field hockey team, and all of them well. This season, she is the center midfielder on a Gators squad that is a major contender in the Colonial Conference Patriot Division and considered a viable threat in South Jersey Group 1. A second-team all-conference selection as a junior, Kowalski is a member of the National Honor Society. She is undecided on a college, but hopes to play field hockey and major in art therapy.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
The Muellers of Mayfair are firm believers in education. But they differ on their choice of courses. Take June Mueller, 43 - family matriarch - and Dennis, 22, her son. Both graduated last month from La Salle University as religion majors. Their ultimate goal is to teach religion on the college level after doing graduate study at La Salle. Then there are June's two daughters - Joy, 20, and Charity, 17. While both are churchgoers, their main interest lies in art therapy rather than religion.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the intensity of artistic genius, Jacquie Malia worked on her masterpiece, painting her shirt as well as the paper in front of her. "It's looking like a Picasso now," said art therapist Lisa Houck as she leaned over Jacquie's shoulder in the recreational therapy room at Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children. An impish 12-year-old girl in a blue rugby shirt, Jacquie beamed at her creation. Wild black dashes flew across a background of muddy brown in the abstract work she had aptly titled Thunderstorm.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Jenna Bass wrote an autobiography in watercolor. As the Hunterdon County, N.J., artist began to recover from the eating disorders that were ruining her life, blood reds receded and bright pinks proliferated in her work. "Looking back on these paintings is really profound for me," says Bass, 26. "They're so far from where I am now. " I meet the stylish and personable artist at the Mount Laurel offices of the Renfrew Center, a rehabilitation program specializing in eating disorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Caroline Stewart, For The Inquirer
The stars were out Actress Mia Farrow was in town to receive the city's Marian Anderson Award May 10 at the Kimmel Center with an audience of 2,000. Before the award program began, Farrow attended the black-tie dinner for 500 guests, which was chaired by David L. Cohen of Comcast and held at the Kimmel. The gala concert, hosted by Alvin Ailey artistic director Judith Jamison, featured performances by the Philadelphia Orchestra, opera singer Angela Brown, singer-songwriter Carly Simon, the Keystone State Boychoir and Pennsylvania Girlchoir, and Esperanza Spalding, winner of this year's Grammy for best new artist.
LIVING
August 26, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Pharoah, 12, whistles in every room of the house and the universe, too. He's more secure, now, after living in many homes and responds well to flexible rules. He longs for a permanent family and a dad who will take him on deep-sea fishing trips. In his heart, he has a wish for a dog, too, plus younger brothers and sisters. And if the family allowed him be on a football team - that would be the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. There are neglect, trauma and instability in Pharoah's background, and he is receiving therapy to help him cope with issues of depression, loss, anger and abandonment.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Patricia Ilgren Kapp, 63, of Ridgefield, Conn., an art therapist who worked in and around Philadelphia, died Thursday, Aug. 18, of cancer at Regional Hospice & Home Care in Danbury, Conn. Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Kapp was the daughter of Dr. Herbert and Maxine Ilgren. She lived in Roxborough before moving to Connecticut. A gifted artist, Mrs. Kapp had always wanted to pursue a career in art. She graduated from Lower Merion High School and attended Alfred (N.Y.) University, but took two years off to travel and study art in Europe.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four teenage girls - all of whom have been raped or abused, overdosed on pills or cut themselves, or lived in foster care or detention homes - came to some place Friday none had ever been. The Barnes Foundation. The teens live now in a residential facility in Rosemont called theVillage for 60 girls like them. These girls were the four for whom art therapy this year has been the most healing, who have best used art projects at theVillage to help them control their emotions and be present in the moment.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Jenna Bass wrote an autobiography in watercolor. As the Hunterdon County, N.J., artist began to recover from the eating disorders that were ruining her life, blood reds receded and bright pinks proliferated in her work. "Looking back on these paintings is really profound for me," says Bass, 26. "They're so far from where I am now. " I meet the stylish and personable artist at the Mount Laurel offices of the Renfrew Center, a rehabilitation program specializing in eating disorders.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
You'd recognize the faces: mob boss Tony Soprano, chemistry teacher-turned-meth-chef Walter White, and everyone's favorite dad, Homer Simpson. You may not recognize the name of the artist, Peter Somenshein, 28, of Narberth. But with his forthcoming solo show at the Oasis Art Center, that, too, may change. "It's been really cool working with Peter," says Maggie Mills, one of the artists who instruct aspiring talents at Oasis in North Philadelphia. "He's made amazing progress in the time he's been here.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
She doesn't look like a revolutionary. Now in her early 70s, Linda Lee Alter is diminutive, gracious, and soft-spoken, with a fringe of white hair and rimless glasses. During an interview in her light-filled Center City apartment, she was dressed simply and conservatively: charcoal sweater vest, pearl-gray blouse, black slacks, flats. Yet with one bold gesture, Alter has transformed Philadelphia into a must-visit city for anyone interested in the work of female artists. Alter spent a quarter-century assembling an impressive collection: approximately 400 works made during the last four decades by more than 150 American women.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011
Julie Kowalski has played a variety of positions for Gateway's field hockey team, and all of them well. This season, she is the center midfielder on a Gators squad that is a major contender in the Colonial Conference Patriot Division and considered a viable threat in South Jersey Group 1. A second-team all-conference selection as a junior, Kowalski is a member of the National Honor Society. She is undecided on a college, but hopes to play field hockey and major in art therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Caroline Stewart, For The Inquirer
The stars were out Actress Mia Farrow was in town to receive the city's Marian Anderson Award May 10 at the Kimmel Center with an audience of 2,000. Before the award program began, Farrow attended the black-tie dinner for 500 guests, which was chaired by David L. Cohen of Comcast and held at the Kimmel. The gala concert, hosted by Alvin Ailey artistic director Judith Jamison, featured performances by the Philadelphia Orchestra, opera singer Angela Brown, singer-songwriter Carly Simon, the Keystone State Boychoir and Pennsylvania Girlchoir, and Esperanza Spalding, winner of this year's Grammy for best new artist.
NEWS
August 21, 2010 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disclosure was eye-opening to Philadelphia School District art teacher Alisha Hagelin. An 11th grader with emotional behavior problems matter-of-factly told her: "In art class, I take my anger out on the art. And in the other class, I don't have anything, so I take it out on the teacher. " Hagelin, a graduate student at Moore College of Art and Design and the art teacher at Germantown High School last year, was interviewing the student for her thesis project. "I already believed that art helps kids with emotional behavioral disturbance," she said.
NEWS
August 7, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lori Gibbs paints by dictation, following step-by-step instructions from artists who cannot use their hands and some who cannot speak. Asking "yes and no" questions and using a yardstick, pencil, color chart, and a bucket of brushes, she translates the visions of severely disabled students at the Bancroft School at Voorhees Pediatric Facility. She's a "tracker" trained in artistic realization technologies (A.R.T.), developed in the 1990s by painter Tim Lefens of Belle Mead, N.J., who is based at Princeton University.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|