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NEWS
May 26, 1993 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If women in the corporate realm think they've got it tough, they should ask a female artist what it's like to navigate through the art world's treacherous straits. Or better yet, query a Guerrilla Girl. A band of women artists who wear ape suits, pun simian, and call attention to sexism in the art world, the Guerrilla Girls: Have plastered the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City with posters when the institutions neglected to include women in major exhibitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | BY ROBERTA FALLON, For the Daily News
THERE ARE some new CSAs in town, but the only veggies or fruits that participants are likely to find in their shares will be still lifes or sculpture. "CSA" usually refers to community supported agriculture, in which you pay a fee to receive shares of a farm's seasonal produce. The fees help support the farm, while shareholders get fresh goods at good prices. Now that model is taking root in the art world, but it's called "community supported art" instead. Two Philadelphia programs launched last month: the Philadelphia Folklore Project CSA and a joint CSA by alternative galleries Tiger Strikes Asteroid and Grizzly Grizzly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Courtney Curtis and Pete Stengel are strolling on Walnut Street, chatting and occasionally glancing in the shop windows, when suddenly they do a double- take. On the other side of the pane of glass, in the empty storefront in the 1700 block, is a colorful, three-dimensional installation that is definitely not a display of merchandise. Peering in, they see several small windows that seem to open on to a penthouse party, with here a man sitting at a table, there a couple whispering over drinks, over there a dancing couple silhouetted against the skyline - 10 windows in all. What do they think of it?
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Exit Though the Gift Shop" is a funny romp through the art world, and while I don't know if it's a bona fide documentary, I know what I like. The movie is the purported record of a friendship between notorious U.K. street-art renegade Banksy and a goofball camera bug named Thierry Guetta. They met as Guetta assembled a video archive of the street-art movement in Europe and the United States. Or so says Banksy, who does not inspire confidence as a reliable narrator. He lives an anonymous life and appears on camera in shadow, underneath a hoodie.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Thomas Ferrick Jr. and Marc Kaufman contributed to this article
Two women who have helped shape the Philadelphia art world - one on the bricks and stone of city walls and buildings, the other within the sanctified confines of a world-class museum - will share the Philadelphia Award. Jane Golden, artistic director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, and Anne d'Harnoncourt, director and chief executive officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, have been named to receive the award that honors the local citizen who has done the most to "advance the best and largest interests of the community," according to award guidelines.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
Some weeks ago I let loose in this space an admittedly sensation-seeking, largely unprovoked, shotgun blast aimed at the current arts scene in America. The result was a most heartening fusillade of return fire that has left me, truth to tell, enjoying what Winston Churchill described as one of life's most exhilarating circumstances - that of being shot at, and missed. Emboldened, I thought I would return to the subject today. For those who may have forgotten, repressed or missed the original outrage, I was writing in response to the recent victories of the forces of free expression over the hordes of censorious darkness in such matters as whether the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe were legally obscene.
NEWS
May 30, 2006 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The art world can be intimidating. Not the impressionists or Andrew Wyeth, or a third grader's cubist interpretation of Stegosaurus With Amputated Leg, or the portraitists who commit Elvis to black velvet. Those, we get. But in many galleries, and some museums as well, visitors get the feeling that unless they have a degree in fine arts, a hand in the business, or an intuitive misanthropic bent, they're not welcome. "People feel there's this sense of 'otherness' in the art world," says Shelley Spector, a Philadelphia sculptor and gallery owner.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud, 76, the seemingly indefatigable founder and director of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia and the Acadia Summer Arts Program - a.k.a. "Kamp Kippy" - in Maine, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine. She was, said Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, of great significance both to the Art Museum, where she was a long-serving trustee, and to the world of contemporary art, where she championed textiles as a medium and, ultimately, all things fashioned by hand.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Irene Lacher, Special to The Inquirer
You are holding an original Mark Kostabi. That is, the article in your hands is his latest piece, given that Kostabi himself is a master of press hype - or "an adolescent hotdogging in and out of the studio," depending on your point of view. At the moment, Kostabi, witheringly dubbed "the next superstar hype artist" by the Village Voice, is holding court in a 15,000-square-foot space in Hell's Kitchen that he has humbly christened Kostabi World. He is yammering about his dream of conquering the wall space above every couch on the face of the planet.
NEWS
January 20, 2013
Previously best known for his entertaining YouTube skewerings of the art world, "Art Thoughtz With Hennessy Youngman," Jayson Musson, now having his first show with Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, has since become an official member of that sector. He's been cutting up Coogi sweaters (the colorful patterned cotton knitwear sported by Bill Cosby on The Cosby Show and more recently by various rappers) into strips of fabric that he assembles and stitches into patterns of his own. Pulled over stretchers, the finished tapestrylike works look as though they must be based on particular paintings, and their titles hint at such connections, but Musson's fabric manipulations are so subtle it's difficult to pinpoint specific forebears.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
In 1960, pop art was nowhere. But POW! By 1970, it was everywhere. It was coast to coast in the States. It consumed Britain. It hit Brazil and Latin America, Japan, and even the Eastern Bloc dominated by the dread Soviet Union. On Wednesday, the Philadelphia Museum of Art opens "International Pop," a giant exhibition that explores how pop art zipped all over the world like a tsetse fly, spreading images and groans and money and pronouncements - glib and maybe even profound - wherever it showed up. Largely focused on the period from 1956 to 1972, "International Pop" represents a "a moment of informational connectivity unlike anything before," said Erica Battle, associate curator of contemporary art at the museum.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Tom DiNardo, For The Inquirer
Long after he first jarred the art world with Campbell's Soup cans, Brillo Boxes, and silk-screened Marilyns, Andy Warhol's print of Eight Elvises sold in 2008 for $100 million. Was this guy, dead since 1987, an authentic pop art genius or a charlatan getting over on show-off collectors? The question lingers, and it helps drive Opera Philadelphia's world premiere of Andy: A Popera , which opens Thursday. The idea for the opera grew out of a collaboration between the company's general director, David Devan, and the self-described "queer experimental troupe" Bearded Ladies Cabaret and its director, John Jarboe.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud, 76, the seemingly indefatigable founder and director of the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia and the Acadia Summer Arts Program - a.k.a. "Kamp Kippy" - in Maine, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, at her home in Northeast Harbor, Maine. She was, said Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, of great significance both to the Art Museum, where she was a long-serving trustee, and to the world of contemporary art, where she championed textiles as a medium and, ultimately, all things fashioned by hand.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY BECKY BATCHA & LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writers batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
GENGHIS KHAN rides into town, gay rights get celebrated, "Deep Throat" (the Watergate informant, not the smut) appears in a very '70s photo show and the great painter Horace Pippin gets a great big retrospective - his first in 20 years. So stop bellyaching that there's nothing to do. Richard Avedon: Family Affairs, April 1-Aug. 2. Rare exhibit resurrects the fashion photographer's 1976 political statement - a portfolio he shot for Rolling Stone featuring 69 black-and-white portraits of that era's power elite.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norma Jarrett, 88, of Jenkintown, art curator for a suburban synagogue and mother-in-law of the newscaster Larry Kane, died Monday, Jan. 12, of leukemia at Abington Hospice at Warminster. Although it was a volunteer position, Mrs. Jarrett took seriously her work as art curator and director of the Olitsky Gallery at Congregation Beth Or, where she and husband Irvin were members. Before she retired last December after 35 years, Mrs. Jarrett told the Jewish Exponent that she set the bar very high for the artists whose work she displayed.
NEWS
November 17, 2014
ZEN LEN likes feng shui, but doesn't like to be categorized. As an artist, Leonard Bazemore works in wood and clay - and watercolor, oil and acrylic, too. Before his ascent into art, he built his bankroll as a real estate agent - and real estate remains a key in his strategy for success in the art world. It seems contradictory. Commerce and art are usually mutually exclusive, but not for Zen Len. When he was about 10, he delivered newspapers and bought himself sneakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Carolee Schneemann may never be a household name. Though a well-known member of New York's downtown avant-garde in the 1960s, the performance artist, now 75, didn't even get a retrospective in that city until 1996, when the New Museum's then-curator Dan Cameron corrected the omission. But the art world is feeling nostalgic for the ferment of the '60s, and Schneemann was one of its most conspicuously ardent pot-stirrers, using her brains and her often-naked body in solo and collaborative performances that rattled audiences with their outspoken sexuality.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROLAND AYERS was one of those kids who seemed to be studiously bent over his schoolbooks in class, but in reality was hard at work drawing airplanes. Although he did well in school, Roland loved airplanes, and his schoolbooks were filled with drawings of all kinds of planes. His airborne pen-and-ink work dates back to the first grade, and his wife, Sheila Whitelaw Ayers, has drawings with his name written in a child's scrawl at the bottom. Of course, Roland went far beyond airplanes in a long and distinguished art career, creating what one critic called "magically surreal" works in pen and ink, watercolor, gouache and collage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time she was 6, Swarthmore novelist Rachel Pastan knew she would become a writer. Her decision wasn't the result of a blinding artistic epiphany: Nothing seemed more natural for Pastan, who grew up watching her mother, acclaimed Maryland poet Linda Pastan, sit for hours every day at her IBM Selectric. For Rachel, her future simply was a matter of entering "the family business. " And so she did. Pastan, 48, recently wrapped up a book tour for her third novel, Alena , a story about the art world told through a unique, clever reworking of Daphne du Maurier's famous Gothic romance Rebecca . The writing life came easily for the young Pastan.
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