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NEWS
July 13, 2005
ILOVED KARL Rove's recent remarks on what conservatives did after 9/11. He's a real man's man, tough guy and certified draft-dodger! He stood up there saying that, after 9/11, "we conservatives wanted to go to war. " Well, let me ask you, Mr. Rove, what war did you fight in? It's easy to go to war when it's other people getting killed. What did you ever do? You and your cohorts are all a bunch of draft-dodgers. Starting with the president, vice president, secretary of state, you and Rush Limbaugh.
NEWS
August 11, 1990
You can always tell who the front-runner is in a political campaign. It's the candidate who refuses an opponent's challenge to a public debate. The challenger needs the exposure, and takes the offensive. The front-runner, on the other hand, has little to gain, and in fact, risks jeopardizing the lead he or she has by saying the wrong thing the wrong way in front of thousands of voters. That's why you can expect Gov. Casey to continue to dodge debating his Republican challenger, Auditor General Barbara Hafer.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
"The artist should not be known. The artist should not be seen. The artist should not be felt. " Francesco Clemente has just said this, and it would all mean a bit more, hold a tad more weight, if he weren't sitting in a room filled with images he had painted of himself, in an exhibit so dizzy with miniature Clementes and giant Clementes, Clemente heads and Clemente bodies that it resembles Versailles' great hall of mirrors with reflections of...
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@philly.com 215-854-5928
BETWEEN MIXING margaritas at Northern Liberties' Cantina Dos Segundos, Bob Achilles said he was wary of state legislation that lets bars double the two-hour length of happy hour. "I'm just envisioning people getting drunk then leaving after happy hour ends, and not tipping," said Achilles, 34. "But I'm a worrier. We'll find out soon enough. " Dos Segundos, like many Philly bars, hasn't figured out what to do with the wiggle room afforded by the law, which went into effect yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If the name of the drab, depressing all-night diner in Twist rings a bell, that's because The Three Cripples hails from Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist - the establishment where Fagin went for meetings and drink. Not coincidentally, there's a Fagin in Canadian actor-turned-director Jacob Tierney's Twist - and an Oliver and a Dodge (as in Artful Dodger), too. A modern-day transposition of Dickens' hardscrabble classic to a seedy-looking Toronto, Tierney's movie is set in the world of young male street hustlers.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | By Ben Yagoda, Daily News Movie Critic
People who complain about kids' movies usually have one of two complaints: either they think the films are too disturbing for children or they think that they're not disturbing enough. The second group - the ones that are bothered by sickly-sweet stories about Care Bears and such - will likely have some problems with "Oliver & Company," the new animated feature from the Disney people. The movie, after all, takes one of the most disturbing stories ever penned, "Oliver Twist," and does the following with it: makes Oliver a cute kitten, makes Fagin a nice guy and makes Fagin's gang a group of dogs who aren't really thieves, just good-hearted scavengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Is there a more harrowing scene in Victorian literature than that of the famished Oliver Twist, age 9, fed the table scraps rejected by his employer's dog? Poignant and primal, Roman Polanski's splendid adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic pricks the heart and the conscience. Polanski sets himself (and his audience) the challenge of seeing sunshine through the London soot. The director's Oliver Twist, though inexpressibly hopeless in stretches, is never as pessimistic as Tess, his 1979 adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles, also a story of a wronged innocent.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
The crowd cheered as the metallic-blue limousine pulled up to Elmwood Park in Norristown yesterday. Tommy Lasorda was back home. "Hey, curly. How ya doin?" the gregarious Lasorda said to a balding friend as he stepped out of the car. "Katie, how are you?" he asked, turning to another family friend. Lasorda's arrival in this largely ethnic working-class community that is his home town was nothing short of a major event. At a ceremony in the park, the manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers was named honorary chairman of Norristown's Hello Columbus 1992 Committee, joining an effort that started about 60 years ago to honor the famous Italian explorer.
NEWS
December 8, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfeld FOR THE INQUIRER
It's the right time for Media Theatre to produce Oliver!, the 1960 Lionel Bart musical based on Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist. This is a holiday season that's looking as glum as the faces of a crew of workhouse boys, as dreary as a gray English afternoon. So it's perhaps not by accident director Jesse Cline decided to play up the musical's besmeared visage and play down its devil-may-care grin. It would certainly be tough to find a more ruthless-looking set than Kelly Michelle Leight's.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Thurstlic graduated from high school yesterday ranked 11th of 355 in his class, guaranteed an academic and theater scholarship to help him through college. But Thurstlic, 17, is heading out the doors of Ridley High School into a life of petty crime. In fact, he's hoping to turn it into an art form. "This is my first professional job," he said with complete satisfaction. Tonight, he plays the role of an orphan pickpocket in the Media Theater's production of Oliver!
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SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
RYAN HILBURN is built like a battering ram, but on the lacrosse field he is a speedster. Think Denver Broncos slot receiver Wes Welker, but in a fullback's body. And with a nickname like "Sparkplug" you know you won't have to wait long for Hilburn to make his presence felt. Yesterday, the senior attacker from Malvern Prep netted the Friars' first four goals and later added an assist in a 15-6 conquest of host Springside Chestnut Hill. So, just how tall is he? "I'll say 5-8," Hilburn said, smiling, "but I'm barely 5-8. " Add 195 pounds, Popeye-sized forearms and calves and you have a problem for opposing defenses.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Twenty years ago, sitting in a suburban movie theater watching Steven Spielberg's film Schindler's List , I had an awakening. The kind that ignites nerve endings. I knew that Jews, my people by birth and heritage, had been systematically killed by the Nazis simply because they were Jewish. But there was so much I didn't know. Certainly, one missing piece was Oskar Schindler, originally a war profiteer and member of the Nazi Party who ultimately turned hero, trying desperately to put a proverbial finger in the dike by hiring Jews to work in his factories.
FOOD
November 29, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Three Starr veterans have created a modest-priced BYOB about five minutes from the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge in the cute town of Riverton. District 611 (710 Broad St., Riverton, 856-829-1552) partners Brian Baglin (a former general manager at Pod), Catherine Piotrowski (a former general manager at Continental in Old City), and executive chef David Perini (also from Continental) in airy, rustic quarters where the dining room features a wood-burning pizza oven, a polished concrete floor, a "living wall" of plants tucked into niches in the barn-wood walls, and a window to a climate-controlled pizza room where dough is made.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@philly.com 215-854-5928
BETWEEN MIXING margaritas at Northern Liberties' Cantina Dos Segundos, Bob Achilles said he was wary of state legislation that lets bars double the two-hour length of happy hour. "I'm just envisioning people getting drunk then leaving after happy hour ends, and not tipping," said Achilles, 34. "But I'm a worrier. We'll find out soon enough. " Dos Segundos, like many Philly bars, hasn't figured out what to do with the wiggle room afforded by the law, which went into effect yesterday.
NEWS
December 8, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfeld FOR THE INQUIRER
It's the right time for Media Theatre to produce Oliver!, the 1960 Lionel Bart musical based on Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist. This is a holiday season that's looking as glum as the faces of a crew of workhouse boys, as dreary as a gray English afternoon. So it's perhaps not by accident director Jesse Cline decided to play up the musical's besmeared visage and play down its devil-may-care grin. It would certainly be tough to find a more ruthless-looking set than Kelly Michelle Leight's.
NEWS
January 24, 2006 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When L. Paul Bremer was the head of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq, according to his newly released memoir, he called himself the "most threatened American official anywhere in the world. " In one episode in late 2003, he describes how his armored motorcade was ambushed in Baghdad. The window of his car blown out by a roadside bomb, Bremer and an aide ducked as bullets whipped through, and the driver sped off at 80 m.p.h. Once clear, Bremer brushed himself off and resumed the conversation - he had been discussing Swiss travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Is there a more harrowing scene in Victorian literature than that of the famished Oliver Twist, age 9, fed the table scraps rejected by his employer's dog? Poignant and primal, Roman Polanski's splendid adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic pricks the heart and the conscience. Polanski sets himself (and his audience) the challenge of seeing sunshine through the London soot. The director's Oliver Twist, though inexpressibly hopeless in stretches, is never as pessimistic as Tess, his 1979 adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles, also a story of a wronged innocent.
NEWS
July 13, 2005
ILOVED KARL Rove's recent remarks on what conservatives did after 9/11. He's a real man's man, tough guy and certified draft-dodger! He stood up there saying that, after 9/11, "we conservatives wanted to go to war. " Well, let me ask you, Mr. Rove, what war did you fight in? It's easy to go to war when it's other people getting killed. What did you ever do? You and your cohorts are all a bunch of draft-dodgers. Starting with the president, vice president, secretary of state, you and Rush Limbaugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If the name of the drab, depressing all-night diner in Twist rings a bell, that's because The Three Cripples hails from Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist - the establishment where Fagin went for meetings and drink. Not coincidentally, there's a Fagin in Canadian actor-turned-director Jacob Tierney's Twist - and an Oliver and a Dodge (as in Artful Dodger), too. A modern-day transposition of Dickens' hardscrabble classic to a seedy-looking Toronto, Tierney's movie is set in the world of young male street hustlers.
NEWS
June 11, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Thurstlic graduated from high school yesterday ranked 11th of 355 in his class, guaranteed an academic and theater scholarship to help him through college. But Thurstlic, 17, is heading out the doors of Ridley High School into a life of petty crime. In fact, he's hoping to turn it into an art form. "This is my first professional job," he said with complete satisfaction. Tonight, he plays the role of an orphan pickpocket in the Media Theater's production of Oliver!
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