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Arthritis Foundation

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NEWS
November 10, 1995 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Her neatly trimmed red coiffure, manicured nails and matching costume jewelry are evidence that Andrea Burnbauer pays special attention to appearances. Gesturing with hands that display rings on almost ever finger, she confirms, "I'm very vain. " Vanity is what kept the 54-year-old going after being diagnosed with osteoarthritis in 1990 and undergoing hip-replacement surgery in 1992. Among the side-effects of the surgery was the clash of her wardrobe with her new orthopedic cane.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1994 | By Warren King, SEATTLE TIMES Inquirer staff writer Donna Shaw contributed to this article
The introduction of over-the-counter painkillers bearing the name of the national Arthritis Foundation is raising ethical questions about the marketing effort. Beginning this week, "Arthritis Foundation" began appearing as the brand name on four McNeil Consumer Products Co. painkillers: aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen with and without a sleep aid. In return for the use of the foundation's name, McNeil, of Fort Washington, is guaranteeing the foundation $1 million annually for research, and purchasers will receive a free one-year membership in the organization.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the television ad, singer-actress Julie Andrews told of a "new" line of products to ease arthritis pain. But the attorneys general of Pennsylvania and 18 other states saw nothing new about them. The medicines, they said, were repackaged versions of well-known ingredients - aspirin, acetaminophen and ibuprofen - labeled with the name of a prominent patient-advocacy group. Yesterday, the states announced a settlement of nearly $2 million in a deceptive-marketing case brought against McNeil Consumer Products Co., of Fort Washington, and the Arthritis Foundation, an Atlanta nonprofit organization, for marketing the painkillers.
FOOD
November 2, 1988 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. We own a new double-wide mobile home. It was manufactured using formaldehyde. The warning said to beware of the formaldehyde's effects for a short time. The odor is now mostly gone, but in the three closets it's overpowering. Please help. Adele and Irwin Berman Lake Ariel, Pa. A. Formaldehyde is used as a glue or bonding agent in particle board and plywood and gives off a gas. Mobile homes, which are built with a larger amount of plywood and particle board, are more tightly constructed than conventional houses.
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Bonnie Weller
The only things big about the vehicles scooting around the Benjamin Franklin Parkway yesterday were the hearts of the organizers and the drivers. The Mini Grand Prix was a charity event, with proceeds going to the Arthritis Foundation. Thirty souped-down, miniature Indy-style race cars competed in the seventh annual event.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL BRYANT
Without brakes, a bump from behind on a hairpin turn seemed inevitable at yesterday's Mini Grand Prix on the Parkway. Susan Lipschutz's Tinder Box car lost a wing when it hit Eileen Ahern, but both drivers got back in the 45-car race, which benefited the Arthritis Foundation.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
For about 1 percent of those arthritis sufferers who depend on common pain- killers to keep them moving, the very drugs that reduce their pain and inflammation can cause potentially life-threatening stomach ulcers. The problem is serious enough that the Arthritis Foundation is sponsoring a hotline tomorrow to answer questions about arthritis and pain-relievers. One in seven Americans suffers from some form of arthritis, and nearly 13 million of them take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs daily.
NEWS
June 1, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is not just "rheumatism. " The occasional aches and pains of arthritis, which the television commercials say can be soothed by an aspirin, can, if unchecked, become the agony of arthritis. The quicker that proper care begins for the arthritis patient, the more likely the disease will be controlled, said Sheldon Solomon, a Cherry Hill rheumatologist who is president of the New Jersey chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. The earliest symptoms are morning stiffness lasting much longer than normal, swelling in joints and unusually great fatigue, Solomon said.
NEWS
October 15, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
When Matt Maguire goes running, it's usually for more than his health. In high school and at La Salle University, he hit the cross-country course for the honor of his school. As a Philadelphia police officer, the chase involves catching suspects, who sometimes take him on an urban cross-country jaunt. But on Oct. 26 at the Dublin Marathon in Ireland, it will be for an even better cause - to help raise money for research on arthritis - the debilitating condition that crippled his grandmother and also has afflicted his mother.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Marcia Donnelly, 76, of Glen Mills, died of lung cancer Friday, Oct. 19, at her home. Mrs. Donnelly was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer four weeks before her death, but during that time she remained optimistic. "She was always able to squeeze a rainbow from every storm," said her elder daughter, Deborah Urie of Annapolis, Md. A graduate of Pottstown High School, Mrs. Donnelly earned a bachelor of science degree in biology from Immaculata College in 1958. A year later, she was awarded a scholarship from the Arthritis Foundation, and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a master's degree in physical therapy.
SPORTS
August 10, 2012 | By Daniel Carp and Daily News Staff Writer
DAYS OFF are few and far between in major league baseball, but the Phillies did not waste their rare reprieve, taking time instead to support a charitable cause. The Rollins Family Foundation hosted its seventh annual Celebrity BaseBOWL Tournament at Lucky Strike Bowling Lanes on Thursday evening. Proceeds benefited the Northeast Region of the Arthritis Foundation, with Jimmy Rollins' foundation specifically hoping to assist children suffering from arthritic conditions. Many of Rollins' Phillies teammates, including Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Carlos Ruiz, Kyle Kendrick and Roy Halladay, attended the event.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Colette Barr Heldring, 85, a former board member of the Friends of the Council of International Visitors, died Saturday, March 3, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at her home in Wayne. She was the wife of Frederick Heldring, chairman and chief executive officer of the former Philadelphia National Bank from May 1986 to April 1989. Born in Chicago, Mrs. Heldring graduated from Sacred Heart Academy there in 1944. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Dominican University in River Forest, Ill., in 1948 and graduated from the Swiss campus of Loyola University of Chicago, at the University of Fribourg, in 1949.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010
Friday Rocking to support homes Hard Rock Cafe Philadelphia is hosting a series of music events this month to support Habitat for Humanity. Every Friday night, the cafe will have live performances by bands such as Evro and The John Salamone Band this week, Panic Years, The Victor Victor Band, Sounds from Atlantis and Third Wire. All funds raised will support Habitat for Humanity, an organization that builds and rehabilitates houses for local families in need. Doors open at 9:30 p.m., show begins 30 minutes later at the cafe, 1113-31 Market St. Admission is free but a donation is suggested.
NEWS
May 28, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The American Diabetes Association, a leading patient health group, privately enlisted an Eli Lilly & Co. executive to chart its growth strategy and write its slogan. The National Alliance on Mental Illness, an outspoken patient advocate, lobbies for treatment programs that also benefit its drug-company donors. The National Gaucher Foundation, a supporter of people suffering from a horrific rare disease, gets nearly all its revenue from one drugmaker, Genzyme Corp. Although patients seldom know it, many patient groups and drug companies maintain close, multimillion-dollar relationships while disclosing limited or no details about the ties.
NEWS
May 28, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned that drug companies may be tainting nonprofit groups, some - including members of Congress - are calling for stricter disclosure and tax enforcement of corporate donations. But many patient groups and drug companies say they have safeguards and worry that new limits may choke off funds for the nonprofits. "There is a mindfulness now to have your ducks in order," said Laura Otten, director of the Nonprofit Center at La Salle University. "At the same time, there is a sense that there is enough self-watching going on already.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centocor Inc. said yesterday that preliminary results from a study of its experimental rheumatoid arthritis treatment found the compound worked to reduce joint pain and inflammation. The drug, CNTO-148, is a human monoclonal antibody being developed by the Horsham biotechnology company as a successor to Remicade, which is approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis and nine other inflammatory conditions. Remicade had sales of $2.12 billion last year. A human monoclonal antibody is derived from a human protein, as opposed to an animal protein.
NEWS
June 10, 2004 | By Patti Sparacio
Restoring state budget cuts to help people afflicted with arthritis is important to families like ours. My 4-year-old son, Zachary, is one of the many children in New Jersey who suffer from arthritis. He has had systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis since he was 3 months old. We had no idea that arthritis could be so devastating. In addition to pain and swollen joints, he experiences soaring fevers, rashes and fatigue. Zachary has been in and out of the hospital countless times.
NEWS
October 14, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Penny Solomon, artist and good-deed doer, it all began in a basement cafeteria after it was suggested that her region was a remote outpost with no art community to speak of. So you'll excuse the Cherry Hill woman if she takes special pride this weekend in the 19th South Jersey Art Show, which has developed into both a major fund-raiser and an annual display of works of the finest artists in the region. Eighteen years ago, the Arthritis Foundation's state chapter approached Solomon - whose husband, Sheldon, has treated arthritis patients for years at Hahnemann University Hospital and Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Voorhees - about launching a small fund-raiser with her artist friends.
NEWS
September 12, 2002 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Training leaders for the future is the goal of "Leadership Main Line," a program starting this fall sponsored by the Main Line Chamber of Commerce. Bob Pucci, president and chief executive officer of the chamber, said the aim was to nurture prospective leaders. "Great leadership happens when bright, promising people are exposed to the issues that affect a community, when they are given the kind of training that helps them become better leaders, and when they fully understand the impact good leadership can have on a community," he said.
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