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Arthur Conan Doyle

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NEWS
May 19, 2011
Edward Hardwicke, 78, who played Dr. John Watson opposite Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes on television in the 1980s and '90s, has died of cancer. Mr. Hardwicke died Monday at a hospice in Chichester in southern England, the Conway van Gelder Grant talent agency said Wednesday. The English actor, who took on the Watson role in the second year of the series after David Burke dropped out, was an unflappable counterpoint to Brett's nervy characterization of the detective. Mr. Hardwicke played Watson from 1986-88 in The Return of Sherlock Holmes and also played the character in the later series from 1991.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
Britain will issue a se-tenant strip of five 24-pence commemoratives Tuesday on the centennial of the death of Sherlock Holmes. The British Post dates Holmes' "death" to 1893 when the world's most famous detective plunged from the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland while wrestling with his longtime nemesis, Professor Moriarty. The scene of Holmes and Moriarty grappling near the falls (from the story "The Final Problem") is depicted on one of the stamps. Holmes remained dead for 10 years until his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, bowed to public pressure and resurrected his detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Jeremy Brett, the definitive Sherlock Holmes, returns to this classic role tonight in a two-hour production titled Sherlock Holmes: The Master Blackmailer. The plot is inferior, but Brett is not. In Sherlock Holmes: The Master Blackmailer, beginning at 9 p.m. on WHYY (Channel 12), Edward Hardwicke returns as Holmes' sidekick, Dr. John Watson, and Rosalie Williams as Holmes' housekeeper, Mrs. Mary Hudson. If you don't recognize The Master Blackmailer as the title of anything that Arthur Conan Doyle ever wrote, give yourself a gold star.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
SHERLOCK HOLMES liked to say that his unique method of investigation was based on the observation of trifles. The new screen version of the venerable movie staple is based on an observation of its own - that no franchise will nowadays succeed without the enthusiastic support of young males. And so Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.), before he has a chance to make a single brilliant deduction, is tossed into a bare-knuckle brawl with a hairy heavyweight. The scene takes us inside Holmes' head, where he uses his big brain to plot out the sequence of athletic maneuvers that will allow him to duck a punch, break the man's knee, crack his rib, puncture his kidney.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014
NOW THAT "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit" movies are finally wrapped, the filmmakers involved seem more exhausted than elated. At least their post-"Hobbit" interviews make it seem that way. So I asked the opinion of Martin Freeman, who plays the title character in director Peter Jackson's "Hobbit" trilogy. (Jackson also did the "Rings" trilogy.) "I'm probably not as exhausted as Peter is, who has spent every day and every night on it for many, many years," the actor said.
NEWS
December 24, 2009 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The game is not afoot. Sherlock Holmes , with a ripped Robert Downey Jr. in the title role and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels ' Guy Ritchie at the controls, presents Arthur Conan Doyle's celebrated consulting detective in a new light. No longer the wiry icon in houndstooth cape coat and deerstalker, the reimagined Holmes is a moody, muscular figure, an action hero who dashes around grimy old London town in 1891 dodging fireballs and exiting edifices in great haste - once by diving headlong into the Thames.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010
MASTERPIECE MYSTERY!: SHERLOCK. 9 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 7, Channel 12. ARE YOU in "Mad Men" withdrawal? Not sure what you'll have to look forward to on Sundays, now that AMC's admen (and women) have disappeared for another season, taking their tortured lives and their tawdry secrets with them? Sherlock Holmes may be no Don Draper, but he's reinvented himself far more often. This weekend, he does it again, as PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery!" introduces Benedict Cumberbatch ("Atonement")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Made in a fog that is far more dense than the one that always envelops Baker Street when Sherlock Holmes sets out on a case, Without a Clue puts the peerless detective in a hansom cab, but tells us that in reality he was a handsome cad. As humor, what follows is, well, elementary. From the very infancy of movies - the first Sherlock Holmes film was a one- reeler shot in 1903 - Hollywood has been infatuated with Arthur Conan Doyle's sleuth. In most cases, the movies have demonstrated what so many felons learned to their cost: Holmes is indestructible.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
They didn't come to bury Moriarty. How could they? His body was somewhere at the bottom of a Swiss waterfall. They didn't come to praise him, although they paid grudging respect to his genius, evil though it was. No, they came to snicker at his effigy, laid out on Joan Kerins' dining room table, covered with a white tablecloth and looking pretty ridiculous in a cardboard skull mask. "He's been dead at least 12 hours," pronounced Dr. Watson, who surveyed the corpse. The merry mourners laughed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014
NOW THAT "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit" movies are finally wrapped, the filmmakers involved seem more exhausted than elated. At least their post-"Hobbit" interviews make it seem that way. So I asked the opinion of Martin Freeman, who plays the title character in director Peter Jackson's "Hobbit" trilogy. (Jackson also did the "Rings" trilogy.) "I'm probably not as exhausted as Peter is, who has spent every day and every night on it for many, many years," the actor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They make up more than half the world's population, yet women have not yet taken their rightful place in Hollywood as directors. Not that there's a paucity of brilliant female directors, as is evident from Female Gaze: Contemporary Films by Women , an impressive seven-disc boxed set featuring seven feature films and seven shorts by contemporary female directors from around the world. Inch'Allah Dimanche , by Algerian French artist and politician Yamina Benguigui, is about a woman from the former French colony of Algeria who joins her husband in France, where he emigrated more than 25 years earlier.
NEWS
May 19, 2011
Edward Hardwicke, 78, who played Dr. John Watson opposite Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes on television in the 1980s and '90s, has died of cancer. Mr. Hardwicke died Monday at a hospice in Chichester in southern England, the Conway van Gelder Grant talent agency said Wednesday. The English actor, who took on the Watson role in the second year of the series after David Burke dropped out, was an unflappable counterpoint to Brett's nervy characterization of the detective. Mr. Hardwicke played Watson from 1986-88 in The Return of Sherlock Holmes and also played the character in the later series from 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010
MASTERPIECE MYSTERY!: SHERLOCK. 9 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 7, Channel 12. ARE YOU in "Mad Men" withdrawal? Not sure what you'll have to look forward to on Sundays, now that AMC's admen (and women) have disappeared for another season, taking their tortured lives and their tawdry secrets with them? Sherlock Holmes may be no Don Draper, but he's reinvented himself far more often. This weekend, he does it again, as PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery!" introduces Benedict Cumberbatch ("Atonement")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The game is not afoot. Sherlock Holmes, with a ripped Robert Downey Jr. in the title role and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels' Guy Ritchie at the controls, presents Arthur Conan Doyle's celebrated consulting detective in a new light. No longer the wiry icon in houndstooth cape coat and deerstalker, the reimagined Holmes is a moody, muscular figure, an action hero who dashes around grimy old London town in 1891 dodging fireballs and exiting edifices in great haste - once by diving headlong into the Thames.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By John Rossi
He is the most celebrated figure in English literature. No, not William Shakespeare or King Arthur, but the lean, hawkeyed inhabitant of 221B Baker Street, Mr. Sherlock Holmes - perhaps the only fictional character who is the subject of a full-blown biography. Arthur Conan Doyle, a bored English physician harassed by creditors, created Holmes in 1887 to while away the time as he waited for patients to show up. Now Holmes is the central figure of a major film opening on Christmas and starring Robert Downey Jr. as the world's greatest consulting detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
SHERLOCK HOLMES liked to say that his unique method of investigation was based on the observation of trifles. The new screen version of the venerable movie staple is based on an observation of its own - that no franchise will nowadays succeed without the enthusiastic support of young males. And so Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.), before he has a chance to make a single brilliant deduction, is tossed into a bare-knuckle brawl with a hairy heavyweight. The scene takes us inside Holmes' head, where he uses his big brain to plot out the sequence of athletic maneuvers that will allow him to duck a punch, break the man's knee, crack his rib, puncture his kidney.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Beverley Potter is a book sleuth. Ask her for an obscure title that you have been after for years, and Potter's on the case. She is the proprietor of The Title Page, a small shop on Summit Grove Avenue. Her used books not only fill its horizontal shelves, but rise in vertical stacks off the floor and spill across her desk, threatening to swallow the telephone. Potter has filled her shelves by scouring thrift shops, community-library sales and house sales of personal collections.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
Britain will issue a se-tenant strip of five 24-pence commemoratives Tuesday on the centennial of the death of Sherlock Holmes. The British Post dates Holmes' "death" to 1893 when the world's most famous detective plunged from the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland while wrestling with his longtime nemesis, Professor Moriarty. The scene of Holmes and Moriarty grappling near the falls (from the story "The Final Problem") is depicted on one of the stamps. Holmes remained dead for 10 years until his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, bowed to public pressure and resurrected his detective.
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