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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | Rathe Miller, for The Inquirer
Ben Newman of Levittown and Ally O'Rourke-Barrett of Yardley are dating. From the more than 3,000 paintings at the Barnes, Newman and O'Rourke-Barrett - he's a techie, she's a teacher - independently picked the same painting as their favorite: Amedeo Modigliani's Readheaded Girl in Evening Dress, from 1918. They stood before the enigmatic lady, discussing her appeal. O'Rourke-Barrett: I just can't stop looking at it. I love the blue and the red against each other. The colors are my favorite part.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
When making a name for yourself in the music business, it helps to have a backstory. And Will Toledo, who records as Car Seat Headrest, not only has a compelling one - he also has a backseat story. That's where the singer and one-man band, now 23, would sit when, seeking privacy while still in high school in Leesburg, Va., he recorded vocals for albums he put out on the internet music store Bandcamp. Initially, the privacy-seeking songwriter called himself Nervous Young Man. Later, he settled on a moniker inspired by the feature of the family Subaru staring him in the face.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
It's not every day that you lose your curator of just about everything except the kitchen sink (and maybe that, too). But, then again, Joseph Rishel is not actually leaving the Philadelphia Museum of Art. After 41/2 decades, much of it spent with the august title of Gisela and Dennis Alter senior curator of European painting before 1900, the John G. Johnson Collection, and the Rodin Museum, Rishel has retired. He's now simply emeritus curator of European painting - a curator who comes in at 10 in the morning, not 9, and doesn't wear a tie, he says.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
For her 50th birthday party last fall, Patty Smith decided not to ask for presents for herself. Instead, the 14-year veteran of the Philadelphia School District asked for a gift for her third graders at Anderson Elementary School. Anderson, in West Philadelphia, has no art teacher; the position has sat vacant all school year. So Smith asked friends and family to donate money to bring the Claymobile - a traveling ceramic arts program - to her classroom. On Thursday night, Smith's students exhibited their work and got a chance to see their creations for the first time after they had been fired in the kiln.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Built during the Depression to make a grand statement, the historic Landis Theater is again at the centerpiece of a plan to rebuild downtown Vineland, N.J. Under a partnership announced Tuesday, the Landis will be the new Cumberland County base for the Bay Atlantic Symphony. Beginning with the 2016-17 season, the orchestra will bring its subscription concert series to the landmark theater. "We think we will bring in some of the most beautiful music in the world," said Paul Herron, executive director of the Bay Atlantic Symphony.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
On April 14, the 2016 Philadelphia Antique & Art Show hosted its 54th annual show and preview party under an enormous tent on the Marine Parade grounds of the Navy Yard. The preview party brought in more than 1,000 committee members, patrons, sponsors, exhibitors, and friends for a sneak peek at the timeless treasures, marking the beginning of the three-day show. This year's beneficiary, the Penn Acute Research Collaboration at Penn Medicine, will use the $500,000 raised to bring together physicians and researchers to develop innovations that improve patient care.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Torrential rains, flooded concert areas, and lots of mud were the dominant images of this year's New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, which came to a soggy end last Sunday. This, however, is the visual the organizers hope will endure: The legendary Ellis Marsalis Jr. and his four musician sons, Branford, Wynton, Delfeayo, and Jason - on piano, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, and drums. Each is framed by a floor-to-ceiling window of a prototypical Garden District home, part of a tableau of greens, blues, and oranges against a night sky slit by a crescent moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016
Friday-Sunday Love and death Sophie Treadwell's grimly expressionistic 1928 drama Machinal reflects the playwright's other career as a journalist. It's based on the era's sensational murder trials of young women, ritualistically telling the story of a downtrodden stenographer who marries her boss, kills him when she falls for a younger man, and ends up on death row. The EgoPo Classic Theater production goes on at the Latvian Society, Seventh and Spring Garden Streets. Times: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A woman who was severely injured after an 18-year-old college student fell on her from an eighth-floor Center City window ledge last year has sued the teen's estate, the property companies, and the Art Institute of Philadelphia. The incident left Erica Goodwin, 45, of Lansdowne, permanently disabled and unable to return to her job at the state Department of Human Services, her lawyer, Joe Tucker, said Wednesday. Goodwin was walking on 16th Street about 6 p.m. on Jan. 15, 2015, when Rebecca Kim fell from an eighth-floor window of an apartment building at 1530 Chestnut St. The building housed students enrolled at the Art Institute; Kim, a Temple University freshman, was there visiting a friend.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Philadelphia's children have lost a lot because politicians in Harrisburg have refused to adequately and equitably fund public education. The injustices have been well-documented, from the loss of school nurses and guidance counselors to the sorry physical state of some district schools. Arts and music programs have always been more fragile in Philadelphia due to the inadequate state funding formula that forces districts to rely on local property taxes - an inequitable system that disadvantages poorer districts.
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