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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
Jeff Larson, Caleb Hammons, and Andrew Dinwiddie are Brooklyn-based curators of absurd performance. Their aesthetics and tastes are disparate, unconventional, and, well, Brooklyn-y. The seven performances, a one-off FringeArts production at the former Bok Technical High School in South Philadelphia, were not interconnected or thematically bound by any commonality. But somehow they worked together as an event, though some soared far higher than their peers. Cynthia Hopkins began the night with a haunting darkness, a tone that would not reappear.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | Thomas Hine, FOR THE INQUIRER
For art museums, this season is all about the Big Picture, in more ways than one. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is providing a visual panorama of how Americans responded to one of the most catastrophic events of the 20th century. And at its heart is an epic, CinemaScope-scale painting of a grotesque event, Gassed by John Singer Sargent, on loan from the Imperial War Museum in London. The great 20th-century Mexican muralists also produced some big pictures, often on big subjects, such as The Epic of American Civilization , by José Clemente Orozco.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
If any musician / composer could lay claim to a been-there-done-that badge, it's Jah Wobble. An old friend of Johnny Rotten, Wobble cofounded Public Image Ltd. when his singer pal left the Sex Pistols. Together, Rotten (now going by his real name, John Lydon) and Wobble (born John Joseph Wardle) crafted a hauntingly atmospheric ensemble, with the latter creating the rhythm of post-punk with the dub-reggae-infused pulse that filled albums such as Public Image and Metal Box / First Edition . Wobble's bass lines were as aggressive as they were laconic, as harsh as they were balming.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Sometimes you eat the catfish, and sometimes the catfish falls from the sky and smacks you in the face. Lisa Lobree learned that lesson Labor Day morning when she was walking to meet her CoreFitness class near the Art Museum, heard a "rustling" in the trees, and then -. "Suddenly I was slammed by something," Lobree recalled Friday. "I was like, 'What?!' I was freaking out. " The injuries: Minor. The trauma: Immeasurable. The theory: A bird was flying with the fish in its mouth and accidentally dropped it. On her face.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
Ian McEwan was ranked by the Times of London among the 50 greatest British writers since 1945. His novels, including Amsterdam , which won the 1998 Man Booker Prize, and Atonement , a 2001 novel made into a 2007 Oscar-winning movie, have attracted a large worldwide audience. McEwan visits the Free Library on Wednesday for a conversation about his new novel, Nutshell . The book is based on the story of Hamlet , told from the point of view of a fetus. McEwan talked about his new book and his writing life.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, STAFF WRITER
By 1987, the terrifying and mysterious new syndrome afflicting gay men had become a deadly epidemic with a name: AIDS. That year, 28,000 Americans would get HIV. One was 19-year-old Brian Sanders, infected by a man in New Hope who got sick shortly afterward. "I thought it was the flu. Then I heard he died three months later. I never really put that together," said Sanders, now 49 and artistic director of the dance-theater company Brian Sanders' JUNK. "Maybe I just never wanted to. " Today, Sanders is marking 30 years of living with HIV - and, with the benefit of perspective, finally putting the pieces together.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
Arts smarts. What is the job of arts journalists today - to be mere cheerleaders, or to ask tough questions about what we are hearing on stage, what we are missing, and why? A group of Philadelphia arts leaders and journalists consider the question at the Kimmel Center's free open house at 10 a.m. Sept. 10. Howard Shapiro of WHYY's Newsworks leads a panel that includes Philadelphia chief cultural officer Kelly Lee, Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance president Maud Lyon, Karin Copeland of the Arts and Business Council, and other arts administrators.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Patricia Ilgren Kapp, 63, of Ridgefield, Conn., an art therapist who worked in and around Philadelphia, died Thursday, Aug. 18, of cancer at Regional Hospice & Home Care in Danbury, Conn. Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Kapp was the daughter of Dr. Herbert and Maxine Ilgren. She lived in Roxborough before moving to Connecticut. A gifted artist, Mrs. Kapp had always wanted to pursue a career in art. She graduated from Lower Merion High School and attended Alfred (N.Y.) University, but took two years off to travel and study art in Europe.
NEWS
September 3, 2016
Sweet deal Every first Sunday of the month, the Barnes Foundation offers free admission for its stunning collection of some of the greatest art ever created. But this free Sunday is sweeter than the rest. Weckerly's Ice Cream, the small-batch purveyor in West Philadelphia, has set up a pop-up shop at the Barnes so you can fuel your love of art and your sweet tooth. In addition to such flavors as nectarine- rosemary sorbet, caramel corn, and peaches and cream, the Weckerly's pop-up will also sell an exclusive ice cream sandwich called the Barnes Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Recently, some have noted that a statue of Frank Rizzo — police chief, law-and-order mayor, and lifelong South Philly scrapper — makes for a charged presence , looming nine feet tall on the steps of the Municipal Services Building. Rizzo - whose enduring image may be rushing to quell a riot, nightstick in his cummerbund - is a complicated fixture in the public square. But his likeness is just one quirk of a public art collection that looks very little like Philadelphia today, and a lot like a Main Line country club circa 1950.
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