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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
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NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Monday was Karen Chigounis' first day on the job - at the place where she's been at work for the better part of four decades. "Day One has been absolutely beyond my wildest dreams," said Chigounis, 66, the new chief administrator of the Perkins Center for the Arts. "One of the most positive experiences of my life. " A Moorestown resident, a mother of four and grandmother of four, Chigounis succeeds Alan Willoughby, a respected ceramist who retired Jan. 29 after 25 years as Perkins' executive director.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
West Philadelphia's 52nd Street is crowded with shops, a somewhat faded commercial corridor that still buzzes with life. Spiffy shoe stores have been recently renovated and, at closing time, a young man in the striped shirt of the Reebok sales clerk attends to the welcome mat with a broom, preserving that shine for the next day's customers. Jamaican bakeries compete for business, alongside purveyors of Muslim fragrance oils. And amid this crowded street of stores is the Urban Art Gallery, a half-mile south of the elevated train stop.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016
Patience. Sergio Martins, a master tailor at Boyds for 16 years, has massive amounts of it. After all, a tailor's work is never done, and he's at the top of his game. About 90 percent of Boyds' clients for men's suits are fitted by Martins. Tailoring, he explains, is an art form that can't be measured in the number of suits or dresses sold. "It's an inner feeling," he said, "that you've done your best work, and a customer is going to look his best. You just know. " But his craft is dying, and others like Martins, 56, who spent years, if not decades, honing their craft in their native countries and taking it to the United States are disappearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Admirers of the seldom-heard 1913 Italo Montemezzi opera L'amore dei tre re ( The Love of the Three Kings ) are used to having to hunt for it, if only because it was so popular in the first half of the 20th century and fell off the map during the second half. But at the intermission during the Academy of Vocal Arts presentation of the opera Tuesday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, I was on a different search - for what I wasn't hearing. All the right things were on stage - a good, 60-strong orchestra under Christofer Macatsoris, a cast who, even if their voices weren't always up to the considerable task at hand, understood the piece so minutely as to know exactly how each scene functioned.
NEWS
January 25, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CULTURE WRITER
Threats of big, bad snow disrupted cultural life in Philadelphia on Saturday - including that annual ritualized civic assembly of arts, business, and political leaders, the Academy of Music Anniversary Concert and Ball. The event, planned for Saturday, was canceled for the first time since its start nearly six decades ago. Other groups nixed concerts Friday and Saturday, and the fates of several Sunday concerts remained in doubt, pending the timing and severity of the storm. Jerry Blavat at the Kimmel was put off until Feb. 28. Fans of Italo Montemezzi's L'amore dei tre re won't be able to hear it Saturday, but the Academy of Vocal Arts is still offering two other performances.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CULTURE WRITER
Threats of big, bad snow disrupted cultural life in Philadelphia on Saturday - including that annual ritualized civic assembly of arts, business, and political leaders, the Academy of Music Anniversary Concert & Ball. The event, planned for Saturday, was canceled for the first time since its start nearly six decades ago. Other groups nixed concerts Friday and Saturday, and the fates of several Sunday concerts remained in doubt, pending the timing and severity of the storm. Jerry Blavat at the Kimmel was put off until Feb. 28. Fans of Italo Montemezzi's L'amore dei tre re won't be able to hear it Saturday, but the Academy of Vocal Arts is still offering two other performances.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
At an April 8 grand opening, a ball of fire will rise from Penn's Landing. A massive South Broad Street fair will follow on April 23, featuring art, music, performance, and a trick or two. Bookended by these attractions, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts will return to the city for its third run, a bit smaller this go-round, more concentrated, but with dozens of events and a decidedly international flavor. The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, organizer of the festival, will release details of many events Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
The Queen Village Neighborhood Association said it had these ugly electrical junction boxes on every street. What could be done about them? On a recent Wednesday, Ryan Psota was the 15th artist to transform the nearly six-foot-tall metal boxes into works of art. Using brushes, a roller, a beaded paddle, and cardboard coffee-cup sleeve, Psota, 26, created a background texture for his line drawings at a box at Seventh and South Street - with the...
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Richard Reiss was 14 and still in school, he began his cooking career at his father's restaurant near his home in Alameda, Calif., according to his autobiographical notes. "His family roots, a combination of Russian, Jewish, and Greek, meant there was a big emphasis on both food and family," the notes say. But for most of his career, he was "running GE's technology division in Maryland," he wrote. Until 2001. At age 55, he decided to become a chef, and enrolled in Johnson and Wales University in Providence, R.I., from which he graduated cum laude.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia advertising executive Marc Brownstein has been appointed chair of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Philadelphia's advisory board to help further collaboration between the region's creative and business communities. Brownstein, president and CEO of the Brownstein Group, succeeds Ray Carballada, president and CEO of ShootersINC, a digital content firm with offices in Philadelphia and New York. Brownstein said he looks forward "to strengthening the links between creativity and workforce innovation, and helping ABC continue to develop nationally renowned programs that incorporate design thinking, employee engagement and social impact.
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