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ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2015
ISSUE | ARTS ECONOMY Cultural learning Yes, Philadelphia needs more arts jobs to "enrich the lives of all Philadelphians," as an Inquirer editorial noted ("A need for more arts jobs," July 20). And it isn't much of a stretch that many of the artists enriching our lives will get their start in the city's public schools, and that the audiences who fill the galleries and concert halls begin their love of the arts in grade school. That's why continuing to remove the arts from the School District curriculum certainly won't add to the enrichment of our lives.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A new report that indicates Philadelphia has lost more jobs than New York, Chicago, and several other big cities in creative industries such as music, theater, and related fields should concern arts leaders and public officials. Some in the arts community disagree with the Center for an Urban Future's assessment in June that Philadelphia experienced a 24 percent decline in creative jobs between 2003 and 2013. They say self-employed workers and workers in related jobs such as graphic design and communications were wrongly left out of the survey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was little talking during X's stand at Underground Arts on Saturday night. Instead, the band that helped define the punk sound of 1980s Los Angeles motored through their catalog. Sticking largely with the earlier material that has categorized the band, they began with "Your Phone Is off the Hook, But You're Not" from their 1980 debut in Los Angeles and barely stopped to catch their breath throughout. X hasn't released any new material in awhile, but that has not stopped it from intermittently touring since going on hiatus.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of the Electric Factory concert venue is part of a plan to renovate a mostly vacant structure in center city next to a Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts building into a mid-rise residential tower. The Logan Square Neighborhood Association held a vote Tuesday on owner Convention Center Parking LP's proposal to add four stories to the dilapidated six-story building at 142 N. Broad St. and to convert it into apartments or condo units, association President Drew Murray said.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
A glance down the hallway toward the gallery of the Woodmere Art Museum, where its 74th Annual Juried Exhibition begins, reveals the quirky aesthetic of jurors and artist brothers Steven and Billy Dufala. In the distance, an enormous, featureless, off-white creature shaped like a cross between a duck and a sheep lies on the floor. Behind it is a large painting of two women standing side by side against a starry night, one holding an ungainly cloudlike form, the other's face hidden by a mass of droopy hair - or something like hair.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederic Howard Toone Bacon, 88, of Pottsville, Pa., former director of art education for the Philadelphia School District, died Tuesday, June 30, at his home. Though he had no children of his own, he was "the father I never had," said his sister Evie Barnwell, whose father died when she was 3. She recalls Pottsville winters when she was a child, when she and Mr. Bacon's three other siblings would trudge through fallen snow to school. "He would go first and break the trail," Barnwell said.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 10 years, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been systematically digitizing its entire collection of about 230,000 paintings, drawings, sculptures, furniture, artifacts, tapestries, rugs, personal artifacts - everything. Photographs, curatorial and conservation details, provenance, and analytical and art-historical minutiae have all been diligently recorded, entered into an increasingly vast database, and placed online. Other museums have also been putting their collections online, but Art Museum officials say they have moved forward with a thoroughness matched by few. Make no mistake, this is a slog.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - A woman sits between two easels in David Kassan's studio, her bony dancer's feet dangling above the hardwood floor, and she's content to simply listen as her nephew tries to demystify what he does with a paintbrush. Kassan, 38, doesn't consider himself a "photorealist" just because his paintings bear an uncanny resemblance to their subjects, he says. His portraits, life-size and often full-body, have a three-dimensional quality that makes one imagine that his aunt, Dale Katzen, visiting on this weekday afternoon last month, will emerge from the canvas at any moment and walk across the room.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
During September's great papal convergence, when well over a million Catholics and associated others are expected to blanket the city from river to river, more than a few visitors might want to see the riches arts and culture groups have worked hard to lay out before them. Right there on the Parkway, at the locus of festivities for Pope Francis' visit, an exhibition of Bibles beckons at the Free Library. The Franklin Institute is flying in treasures from the Vatican. And for a knowing crowd, a postcard-sized 15th-century oil by Jan van Eyck at the Philadelphia Museum of Art awaits the devotional gaze, its title of suddenly modern relevance: Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata . But the ability to take in the city's cultural riches will be hindered.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seemed to Philadelphia Art Commission members a curious notion: SugarHouse Casino was asking for approval to finance a documentary and annual film festival to meet its mandate to invest in public art. Members were receptive Wednesday, but had questions: How does a $100,000 film about the history of Philadelphia as a onetime motion picture mecca constitute public art? How, unlike the LOVE statue, would it be visible to the public? Would such a project endure for years? "What assurances has the city . . . that this is going to be lasting?"
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