CollectionsArts
IN THE NEWS

Arts

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Parking garages rarely merit much architectural discussion. Most of today's designs are no-frills stacks of open floors, laid out to accommodate as many cars as possible. With their shadowy interiors on full display, the naked concrete structures have the melancholy look of buildings that were never finished. Yet, parking garages did not start out as a purely functional architectural form. For evidence, please see the exuberant, art deco garage that stretches for a full block on Chestnut between 11th and 12th Streets.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Frank Fox didn't speak a word of English when he immigrated to the United States from his native Poland as a teenager in 1937. But he got into Central High School two years later and spent the rest of his life learning, writing, teaching, and translating. He was fluent in seven languages. Dr. Fox, 92, who lived at the Quadrangle in Haverford, died Tuesday, Aug. 2, of complications of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. "I could spend hours telling you about him," said his son, Julian.
NEWS
August 11, 2016
ISSUE | DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION Arts can help us get past anger, prejudice During the Democratic National Convention, the arts and culture community's museums and performing-arts venues showed off the beauty and vibrancy of Philadelphia. More importantly, cultural groups stepped up with messages of unity, justice, and civic duty through pop-up performances on Broad Street, a youth art contest to inspire future voters from Fleisher Art Memorial, an issue-based voting display at the Free Library, and political street art. Hundreds of engaging community events and activities allowed locals and convention-goers to use their voice, share their beliefs, and offer social and political solutions.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Kanye: she's a selfie goddess You'd think Kanye West might feel uncomfortable with his wife's propensity to plaster nude pics of her corporeal essence all over the web. You'd be wrong. To him, a Kim Kardashian selfie is art. "Like, I love the ones from the side, the back ones, and the front," West, 39, tells Harper's Bazaar. "I just love seeing her naked. . . . I feel like it's almost a Renaissance thing, a painting. " In true post-feminist fashion, Kanye opines that Kim's bod is her talent: "I think it's important for Kim to have her figure.
NEWS
July 24, 2016
Political party conventions, we are often told, have become exercises in image-making. Each produces two kinds of pictures: the memorable portrait and the cruel cartoon. The first depicts our party's candidate, the strong leader America needs to guide us through these troubled times. The other exposes the foolishness, nay the malevolence, of the opposition, pigheadedly determined to lead the country toward greater chaos and eventual ruin. This same contrast in imagery is visible throughout "Happiness, Liberty, Life?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Murals in Philadelphia have been created, variously, to uplift underserved communities, honor local leaders, fight blight, and amplify grassroots causes. Now, in a swath of the city's Callowhill area, they're advancing a new goal: rebranding a neighborhood. Artists commissioned by the city's Mural Arts Program are installing nine permanent and temporary murals that, collectively, create a revolving outdoor gallery billed as "Spring Arts District. " That also happens to be the identity that developer Craig Grossman, who sought and partially funded the project, is trying to cultivate in this gentrifying stretch between Eighth and 12th, from Noble to Spring Garden Streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I'd like to think the folks attending the Democratic National Convention next week will spend every minute of the day doing intense politicking at the Wells Fargo Center. But I'm willing to bet a few visiting dignitaries, delegates, and volunteers also will strike out to explore the city. My fellow Philadelphians are betting on it, too: Just about every arts and cultural organization in town has an event, exhibit, or performance planned. Here's a taste of what the city will have to offer.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
WHEN PIANIST Sumi Tonooka headlines the 10th annual Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival on Saturday, it will mark her second time at the event, having been a special guest with guitarist Monette Sudler's band at the 2010 installment. But she was far from a stranger to the neighborhood even then; though she's called New York, Boston, and Seattle home over the years, Tonooka was born and raised in Powelton Village. "The festival is literally right down the street from where I grew up," Tonooka said last week, already in Philly and barraged with reminders of her old environs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|