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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
Inquirer critic and culture writer Peter Dobrin tells you who's making news, noise and splash in the Philadelphia arts world and beyond at
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
The Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia became the Please Dance Museum yesterday when Tap Team Two & Company stepped in. The duo helped inaugurate "PNC Bank of Stars," a program designed to bring performing arts to the museum. Mayor Rendell, singer Gary Rosen and Chaku the Children's Chuckler were also on the opening bill.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
A new American operetta is debuting at McCarter Theatre in Princeton tomorrow. It is as American as it is unexpected, and the story of its coming-to-be is a good example of how the arts ought to work in a country so often art-averse. The title of the piece is Night Governess, and its brilliant, witty composer is Polly Pen. It's based on Behind a Mask, a suspense tale Louisa May Alcott wrote under the pseudonym of A.M. Bernard. (And you thought she did only Little Women.) The tale concerns a family's newly hired governess - who seems to have some devious ends in view.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
The Fleisher Art Memorial opens its fall season with its first three-artist exhibit, showing the works of Todd Noe, a metal sculptor who makes familiar yet whimsical objects; sculptress Mei-Ling Hom, who draws on Chinese-American culture in her installation, and Stuart Shils, a painter of city and rural landscapes. The three artists are the first of 15 selected from the Fleisher's prestigious Challenge Series, a competition that drew nearly 500 applicants. The gallery will continue its three-person exhibits through the year until all 15 artists have been exhibited.
NEWS
November 7, 2000 | by Linda Wright Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
Miguel-Angel Corzo was inaugurated yesterday as the second president of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Corzo - one of just a handful of Latino college or university presidents in the United States - was formerly the director of the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles. He's also an accomplished scholar, educator and international consultant for the visual arts who has written and edited more than 20 books and organized one of the three most successful museum exhibitions in U.S. history.
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NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
          More than $2.6 million was awarded Wednesday to 284 arts and cultural organizations around the city by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund, about the same number as last year.       Of those, 20 are receiving their first grants, fund officials said.       Since its founding in 1991, the fund has distributed $40 million in unrestricted operating funds to hundreds of groups, large and small.       The fund also announced that the Georgia E. Gregory Interdenominational School of Music is winner of the Councilman David Cohen Award, a noncash award recognizing an arts organization for its economic and social justice work.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A man was found dead near the Philadelphia Museum of Art Wednesday morning in what police believe to have been a suicide. The man, in his 30s, had a gunshot wound to his chest that police believe was self-inflicted. He was found outside by a runner at 8:23 a.m. near 24th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, near the Philadelphian condominium building, at 2401 Pennsylvania Avenue, and across from the Art Museum. The man, whose name was not released, was pronounced dead by medics at 8:30 a.m. Police say a gun was recovered.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Patricia Stewart Walsh's life appeared to be on the same track as other Chestnut Hill debutantes': private schools, good marriage, charity events, and lots of tennis. But then she met Richard Walsh, a future spy, and her life took a turn for the adventurous. Mrs. Walsh, 88, of Lafayette Hill, died Thursday, April 7, at her home, four years after suffering a stroke. She spent most of her married life in Europe, where her husband worked for the CIA. A graduate of Springside Chestnut Hill Academy, she was dating Walsh's younger brother when she caught the eye of her future husband.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
An abandoned firehouse on the 1800 block of Broadway has been renovated as the latest anchor in a South Camden neighborhood trying to make a comeback. Heart of Camden has spent three years transforming the building into an art gallery to attract youngsters, artists, and developers to the city. On a busy stretch of Broadway, not far from the Delaware River, the soon-to-open arts center sits on a block dotted with a mixture of abandoned storefronts and renovated homes. "It's been a long adventure," said Lisa Kiernan, executive director of the housing and community nonprofit.
SPORTS
April 18, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
He didn't wave to the crowd. He didn't bow, shake anyone's hand, or tip his cap. There was no spotlight. In fact, said those who were there, in the last moment of the most mythical career in American sports, Babe Ruth never even looked up. Instead, he stuffed his glove into a back pocket of his gray Boston Braves uniform and, rather than jog toward the visitors' dugout, limped off alone toward Baker Bowl's center-field clubhouse. And there, like a god ascending into the clouds, he disappeared.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Kristina Wong is on a mission. As a performance artist who self-identifies as someone "who fights for the marginalized," she wanted to find some way to "leave a legacy" by "making a difference. " The Wong Street Journal is her message. Treading the fine line between preaching and entertaining, she tells us about her three-week trip to Northern Uganda. As a third-generation Chinese-American, Wong goes to Africa, where she is mistaken for a white person (so much for her idealized solidarity among people of color)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Antique & Vintage Flea Market Furniture, jewelry, collectibles, clothing, glass & more. Historic Headhouse Square, Second & Pine Sts.; 215-413-3713. www.PhilaFleaMarkets.org . 4/16. 8 am-5 pm. Auction Jimmy Knoll will be the auctioneer. Bethany Lutheran Church, 401 Martin St. 4/16. 8 am. Berry Basket Quilt Show Berry Basket Quilters present "Out of Hibernation" at Kirby's Mill Elementary School, 151 Hartford Rd., Medford. $8. 4/16. Friends Spring Flea Market, Book & Plant Sidewalk Sale Pots, flowers, used books, children's activities & more.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
A portion of Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud's art collection, including four Georgia O'Keeffe paintings, will be sold at auction in the coming months to help fund the Fabric Workshop and Museum, the contemporary art institution Stroud founded in 1977. Stroud, who died in August, was the seemingly indefatigable force behind the Fabric Workshop, directing operations, formulating artistic plans, and helping secure funding for its ambitious exhibitions and programs. Over the decades, artists have been invited to spend time there creating everything from ties to massive installations; they have participated in collaborative projects; and they have been enticed, Stroud once said, "to explore, to take liberties.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Classical Music Critic
One of the first things you may have noticed in the International Pop show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art was a timeline mapping the genre's first appearance in the United States. International Pop gave New York's Sidney Janis Gallery the honors with its 1962 New Realists show. A few more yards into International Pop, a block of wall text called the Janis show "the first exhibition to make a clear statement for pop art in the U.S. " But there was at least one other show at the time that made a clear statement for pop art in the United States.
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