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NEWS
November 2, 2011
By Carole Haas Gravagno Zulmarie Nazario, a 16-year-old junior at Palumbo high school in South Philadelphia, is a testament to the power of arts education. She has been painting and drawing at the Fleisher Art Memorial just about every week since she came here from Puerto Rico three years ago. "I feel like a totally different person when I come to Fleisher," said Zulmarie. "It allows me to express my feelings and not be afraid of being judged or self-conscious. " Today, Zulmarie will represent the Fleisher Art Memorial at the White House, where first lady Michelle Obama is scheduled to present this year's National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards.
NEWS
August 31, 1986 | By Barbara Hall, Special to The Inquirer
During an arts-education conference last month at Columbia University in New York City, one speaker said he saw a bumper sticker that read: "Back to the Frills. " The audience - arts teachers, artists, and arts-in-education administrators - reacted with laughter and a tinge of sad recognition. Frill is a scary word to those who practice or support arts education. The word, implying "nice but unnecessary," is often used to justify cutting or removing arts education from school budgets.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
As part of the wide-reaching education reforms championed by Gov. Kean, New Jersey students might soon have to do a song and dance to get a high school diploma. Or, write a screenplay. Or, perform the role of Hamlet. Or, design an original building. A state task force yesterday issued a report recommending that the state's schools increase the amount of arts instruction that is a mandatory part of their curriculums. The main premise is that the arts are as basic to a good education as reading and math; for students to be fully literate, the report argues, they must be grounded in five major art forms - dance, music, theater, creative writing and visual arts.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | Barbara Hall
Barbara Hall is a freelance journalist who writes on education His name is Andrew, and we nearly lost him. Around 2000, Andrew was a 12-year-old, at-risk student at Harding Elementary School in Erie. He was saved from dropping out, his teachers believe, by an all-community arts-education program focusing on opera. The program, an ambitious and successful effort, thrives today. Erie has received a $15 million, five-year math-and-science grant from General Electric. Thinking creatively, Erie administrators are directing a portion of this to Harding's school opera program.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
The six Burlington County students honored at the Governor's Awards in Arts Education ceremony June 8 in Trenton are full of promise. Chosen on the basis of skills in writing, dance, dramatic arts and music, they are bright, dedicated and purposeful. They paint. They sculpt. They create etchings. One, barely into her teens, has written a play. Another is all but married to her violin. Here are their stories: Tiffany Staton was in the third grade when a music teacher came to her classroom and, like a peddler plying his wares, displayed a variety of instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1993 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing remotely make-believe about the violence in 12-year-old Robert Pass' neighborhood. Gunshots. Stabbings. Drug deals gone bad. It's all part of growing up on the mean streets of Norris Square in North Philadelphia. So when Robert and five other neighborhood youngsters in a community art program wanted to figure out how to put their newly learned skills of stage combat to use, they decided to go with make-believe all the way. The staged fighting - fake punches, choreographed kicks and pretended choking - would be part of a play about the fantastic world of video games, where characters fight and never really get hurt.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal arts money is flowing strongly these days to places that have seen minimal support in the past. Take Nevada, for instance, more famous for its lounge lizards and nuclear test sites than for its symphony orchestras. Funding to that desert state from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) shot up 42 percent from 1990 to 1991. North Dakota has seen a 62 percent rise in NEA funds over the same period. West Virginia is up a whopping 74 percent. At the same time, those places well-known for their arts activities have seen stagnant or declining NEA support, according to an Inquirer analysis of agency budget figures.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The self-deprecating comedy whiz from Upper Darby Township probably didn't think of herself as the cool girl. In her youthful days, Tina Fey was the theater nerd embraced by the Broadway geeks, she writes in Bossypants , her best-selling 2011 memoir. But to Bethany Paxson, Fey was the coolest. As a young teacher and director at the Upper Darby Summer Stage community theater program, Fey made theater so much fun that Paxson, a member of the chorus in Fey's Pippi Longstocking , was inspired to go pro. For that, Paxson, now an actress based in Orlando, Fla., has long wanted to say thanks.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Yvett Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
Great Valley School District has been nominated for the Kennedy Center National School Board Award, given to a district that exhibits outstanding support for arts education, David Morgan, assistant superintendent for instruction, announced Monday at the school board's work session. Great Valley is the only Pennsylvania school system to be cited. "We've approached the arts in ways that no other district has," Morgan said, referring to the district's Community Arts Series, the Delaware Valley Arts Literacy Project and its artist-in-residence program in the schools.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2005 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Mural Arts Program, which has helped young artists create 2,500 murals throughout the city since 1984, has received $550,000 in grants to renovate the building next door to its Mount Vernon Street headquarters. The extra space will allow it to double the number of at-risk youths its programs serve, and give it room to create new programs as well. The building to be renovated was once quarters for the caretakers for artist Thomas Eakins, whose former home serves as the program's headquarters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Lauren McCutcheon, FOR DoTHIS
"A lot of us know what to do when we go to a baseball game: You buy a hotdog, yell a lot, clap and cheer and whistle," said Ruth Anderson, director of arts education at Doylestown's James A. Michener Art Museum. Less obvious: How you and your kids should approach a staid and seemingly stodgy art museum. Five big-deal venues share tips for introducing children to their collections, exhibitions, and programs - and have fun doing it. Barnes Foundation 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, 215-278-7200 . Family programming is relatively new - as in, fewer than five years old - at the Barnes.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Philadelphia's children have lost a lot because politicians in Harrisburg have refused to adequately and equitably fund public education. The injustices have been well-documented, from the loss of school nurses and guidance counselors to the sorry physical state of some district schools. Arts and music programs have always been more fragile in Philadelphia due to the inadequate state funding formula that forces districts to rely on local property taxes - an inequitable system that disadvantages poorer districts.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
More than $2.6 million was awarded Wednesday to 284 arts and cultural organizations around the city by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund, about the same number as last year. Of those, 20 are receiving their first grants, fund officials said. Since its founding in 1991, the fund has distributed $40 million in unrestricted operating funds to hundreds of groups, large and small. The fund also announced that the Georgia E. Gregory Interdenominational School of Music is winner of the Councilman David Cohen Award, a noncash award recognizing an arts organization for its economic and social justice work.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Monday was Karen Chigounis' first day on the job - at the place where she's been at work for the better part of four decades. "Day One has been absolutely beyond my wildest dreams," said Chigounis, 66, the new chief administrator of the Perkins Center for the Arts. "One of the most positive experiences of my life. " A Moorestown resident, a mother of four and grandmother of four, Chigounis succeeds Alan Willoughby, a respected ceramist who retired Jan. 29 after 25 years as Perkins' executive director.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederic Howard Toone Bacon, 88, of Pottsville, Pa., former director of art education for the Philadelphia School District, died Tuesday, June 30, at his home. Though he had no children of his own, he was "the father I never had," said his sister Evie Barnwell, whose father died when she was 3. She recalls Pottsville winters when she was a child, when she and Mr. Bacon's three other siblings would trudge through fallen snow to school. "He would go first and break the trail," Barnwell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a distinctly self-congratulatory air around the Kimmel Center these days. Anne Ewers, its upbeat leader, recently gave a "president's address" in the Perelman Theater, floating statistics on attendance, finances, and building use like a pharmaceutical CEO showing stockholders the direction of dividends - up, up, up. Indeed, positive results of the Kimmel's business plan can be measured now that it has been in effect for several years....
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
When it comes to insuring a healthy future for arts and culture in Philadelphia, does it really matter who becomes the next mayor? The answer is important because, like a prospector who discovers a gold mine then watches others pull riches from it, the Philadelphia arts and culture community has been looking around and wondering when its turn will come. Center City is a boomtown, its vibrant street life and desirable real estate in large part a consequence of arts pioneers taking a chance on new facilities and expanded missions more than two decades ago. Yet even as the city's riches have grown, support for arts and culture groups has not kept pace.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Haynes, named the city's chief cultural officer in May, was a key advocate for creation of a Philadelphia Cultural Fund in the early 1990s. At the time, she headed the Coalition of African American Organizations, which aimed to amplify the voices of groups often overlooked in the press of city business. Since its inception, the cultural fund has provided operating support for hundreds of organizations. This year, City Council increased its allocation by $1.3 million, making about $2.9 million available for grants next year.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The self-deprecating comedy whiz from Upper Darby Township probably didn't think of herself as the cool girl. In her youthful days, Tina Fey was the theater nerd embraced by the Broadway geeks, she writes in Bossypants , her best-selling 2011 memoir. But to Bethany Paxson, Fey was the coolest. As a young teacher and director at the Upper Darby Summer Stage community theater program, Fey made theater so much fun that Paxson, a member of the chorus in Fey's Pippi Longstocking , was inspired to go pro. For that, Paxson, now an actress based in Orlando, Fla., has long wanted to say thanks.
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